User:Fziza/sandbox

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This is my sandbox. Check it but don't wreck it.


6.2 Aftermath of the Controversy

-How did this event change policies in British Columbia?

-What happened in the area after the controversy?


The controversy of policies adopted in recent years to deal with logging practices in the region arose in 2006 when environmentalist groups compared the Clayoquot Watershed Plans to the 1993 provincial government land use decision. Further arguments were also sparked when it was pointed out that the poor management of the logging practices in recent years was to be associated with the excessive turnovers in First Nations Chiefs and Councils.


6.2 Aftermath of the Controversy[edit]

The outcome of the series of protests that lead up to the beginning of the 21st century can be seen through the intact forests that reign the Clayoquot Sound to this day. The effect that environmental groups have had in establishing a solid protection for the forests in the area is considered a significant victory by the people and organizations that in the last 40 years have fought to preserve and protect these forests against logging.

The first significant change of policies for the government occurred with the aftermath of the protests in the 1990s. This change in government policy effectively began in July 1995, when the all 127 recommendations made by the scientific panel on Clayoquot Sound were accepted by BC Forests Minister, Andrew Petter, and the Environment Minister, Elizabeth Cull, on behalf of the New Democratic Party government.[1] Greenpeace was the backbone to those protests, having called a boycott of BC forest products in order to apply pressure to the industry. These boycotts were called off once the recommendations were accepted by the government. Logging was deferred until inventorying of pristine areas was completed, the annual allowable cut in the area was reduced, clearcut areas were reduced to a maximum of four hectares, and eco-based planning was to be done once biological and cultural inventories were completed.[2]

The protests caused the reputation and sales of big logging companies of Clayoquot Sound to receive significant negative impacts, resulting in a need for them to remove themselves and their operations from the area. The First Nations of Clayoquot Sound were therefore able purchase 50% ownership over Clayoquot’s logging rights and a company was formed on behalf of the First Nations - Iisaak Forest Resources Ltd. - to take charge over the logging.[3] An agreement known as the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) was signed in 1999 by Iisaak Forest Resources Ltd. to assure that logging would not be done outside of areas that already had logging and logging roads in them, and that were outside of intact ancient forested valleys of Clayoquot Sound.[4][5]

In 2000 the entire sound was designated as a Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO, further emphasizing the importance of leaving the forests intact, but in no way legally binding companies to stop logging in the future.[6]

Team Comments[edit]

Hi Feddy, below is my edited version of your section. I tried to improve clarity and remove some redundancies. Hope it looks okay to you! --Mmann7 (talk) 02:50, 3 April 2012 (UTC)

I liked how informative your article is. I edited the first sentence of your second paragraph, it sounded biased... I made it sound less biased... But its lookin' good. --FrankRBIV (talk) 03:15, 3 April 2012 (UTC)

Hey! I edited this re-edited version. I took out a lot of extra words, did some sentence re-structuring and edited ideas so they would read out more clearly. So all my edits I did on the Wikipedia page. There was a lot of good information to work with and I think now it just sounds more clear! --Aliarayan (talk) 02:22, 10 April 2012 (UTC)

Hey I've looked over the changes and edits and it all looks good! I'm really liking our page :)--Ashleypiv (talk) 20:50, 10 April 2012 (UTC)

6.2 Aftermath of the Protests (Revised)[edit]

The outcome of the numerous protests at the end of the 20th century can be seen by the intact forests that exist in the Clayoquot Sound to this day. The establishment of solid protection for the forests in the area is considered a positive outcome by the people and organizations that have fought to preserve and protect these forests from being logged in the last 40 years.

Hey, I would re-edit the opening two lines like this: The intact forests that stand in Clayoquot Sound today represent the outcome of numerous protests that occurred at the end of the 20th Century. Having established a solid protection plan for forests in the area is considered to be a positive outcome by people and organizations fighting to preserve and protect biologically diverse forests from being logged for the past 40 years.

I find it a bit more clear and easier to read (less "the" words that are unimportant) --Aliarayan (talk) 01:10, 10 April 2012 (UTC)

The first significant change in government policies occurred after the 1990 protests. Implementation of this change took place in July 1995, when all 127 unanimous recommendations made by the scientific panel on Clayoquot Sound were accepted by the Forests Minister of British Columbia, Andrew Petter, and the Environment Minister, Elizabeth Cull on behalf of the NDP government.[7] Greenpeace played a significant role in these influential protests, having instigated a boycott of BC forest products in order to apply pressure on the industry. The boycott was called off once the scientific panel's recommendations were accepted by the government, deferring logging until an inventory of pristine areas was completed. The Annual Allowable Cut in the area was reduced, and clearcut areas were reduced to a maximum of four hectares. In addition, Eco-Based Planning was to begin once biological and cultural inventories were completed.[8]

The protests impacted the reputation and sales of large-scale logging companies in Clayoquot Sound, which was noticed after they removed themselves and their operations from the area. The First Nations of the Sound were therefore able to purchase 50% ownership of the region's logging rights. A company was formed on behalf of the First Nations to take charge over the logging operations called Iisaak Forest Resources Ltd.[9] An agreement known as the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) was signed in 1999 by Iisaak Forest Resources Ltd. It ensured that logging would not occur outside areas that had already been logged and had logging roads in them, and that were outside of intact ancient forested valleys of Clayoquot Sound.[10][11]

In 2000, the entire sound was designated as a Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO, further emphasizing the importance of keeping forests intact, but in no way legally binding companies to stop logging in the future.[12] This designation brought world recognition of the ecological importance of Clayoquot Sound, and a $12M monetary fund to "support research, education and training in the Biosphere region".[13]

At the end of July 2006, a new set of Watershed Plans was approved, opening the door for logging in a further 90,000 hectares of forest in Clayoquot Sound, including the pristine old-growth valleys[14][15][16]

As of 2007, both logging tenures within Clayoquot Sound are now controlled by first nation logging companies.[17] Iisaak Forest Resources controls Timber Forest License (TFL) 57 in Clayoquot Sound.[18][19] MaMook Natural Resources Ltd, in conjunction with Coulson Forest Products, manages TFL54 in Clayoquot Sound.[20][21]

  1. ^ Harter, John-Henry (2004). "Environmental Justice for Whom? Class, New Social Movements, and the Environment: A Case Study of Greenpeace Canada, 1971-2000". Labour / Le Travail. 54: 112. 
  2. ^ Harter, John-Henry (2004). "Environmental Justice for Whom? Class, New Social Movements, and the Environment: A Case Study of Greenpeace Canada, 1971-2000". Labour / Le Travail. 54: 113. 
  3. ^ "Clayoquot Sound Backgrounder". WC WC Victoria. 
  4. ^ "Clayoquot Sound Backgrounder". WC WC Victoria. 
  5. ^ "Clayoquot River Valley". Friends of Clayoquot Sound. 
  6. ^ Grant, Peter. "Clayoquot Sound". The Canadian Encyclopedia. 
  7. ^ Harter, John-Henry (2004). "Environmental Justice for Whom? Class, New Social Movements, and the Environment: A Case Study of Greenpeace Canada, 1971-2000". Labour / Le Travail. 54: 112. 
  8. ^ Harter, John-Henry (2004). "Environmental Justice for Whom? Class, New Social Movements, and the Environment: A Case Study of Greenpeace Canada, 1971-2000". Labour / Le Travail. 54: 113. 
  9. ^ "Clayoquot Sound Backgrounder". WC WC Victoria. 
  10. ^ "Clayoquot Sound Backgrounder". WC WC Victoria. 
  11. ^ "Clayoquot River Valley". Friends of Clayoquot Sound. 
  12. ^ Grant, Peter. "Clayoquot Sound". The Canadian Encyclopedia. 
  13. ^ British Columbia; Ministry of Forests and Range, http://www.for.gov.bc.ca/dsi/Clayoquot/clayoquot_sound.htm
  14. ^ West Coast Aquatic: Ha-Shilth-Sa article: Clayoquot Sound watershed plans released: War of the Woods II averted, http://www.westcoastaquatic.ca/article_Clayoquot_watershed0806.htm
  15. ^ CBC: Environmentalists angry over new logging in Clayoquot Sound: 2006, http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/story/2006/08/02/clayquot-logging.html
  16. ^ Canada.com; Vancouver Sun article; Eco-logging deal in the works for Clayoquot Sound, August 9, 2006, http://www.canada.com/vancouversun/news/story.html?id=3e81fb9c-b97a-4811-b2ea-6b2f923e95a4&k=81662
  17. ^ Wilderness Committee: Clayoquot Sound, http://wc-zope.emergence.com:8080/WildernessCommittee_Org/campaigns/wildlands/clayoquot
  18. ^ Friends of Clayoquot Sound; Logging - Factsheet, http://www.focs.ca/logging/factsheet.asp
  19. ^ Iisaak Forest Resources: http://www.iisaak.com/operations.html
  20. ^ The Coulson Group: http://www.coulsongroup.com/products.html
  21. ^ Friends of Clayoquot Sound: Logging - Factsheet, http://www.focs.ca/logging/factsheet.asp

Still need to figure out how to put in the citations properly - that's why so far there is only one (Edit: referenced).