User:KYPark/1968

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Edward Montgomery[edit]

The Foundations of Access to Information: A Symposium
Syracuse University Press, Box 8, University Station, Syracuse, New York 13210. (ed.)
1965 Symposium, Syracuse University

Jean Piaget[edit]

Genetic Epistemology
a series of lectures delivered by Piaget at Columbia University, translated by Eleanor Duckworth,[1] published by Columbia Univesity Press.
the first lecture [1]

Theodore Roszak[edit]

The Making of a Counter Culture: Reflections on the Technocratic Society and Its Youthful Opposition

James Watson[edit]

The Double Helix: A Personal Account of the Discovery of the Structure of DNA
  • Anne Sayre (1975) Rosalind Franklin and DNA, W.W. Norton and Company, New York
  • King's College (London) DNA Controversy
  • ``The book has been hailed as revealing the "seamy" side of scientific work, with its author seemingly caring only about the glory of priority and willing to appropriate data from others surreptitiously in order to obtain it. A 1980 Norton Critical Edition included a set of related scientific and literary pieces by such figures as Peter Medawar, Max Perutz, and Robert K. Merton.``

References[edit]

  1. ^ Learners' efforts in figuring out questions and puzzles are more productive than knowing the right answer because higher order thinking processes are involved. Therefore, teachers of critical exploration value the diverse efforts that students make during their explorations even where these efforts do not arrive at expected answers. In facilitating this investigative work, the questions that are asked over and over again by students and teachers alike are, for example: "What do you notice?" What do you mean?" "How you are thinking about it?" "Why do you think that?" "Is that the same as what (someone else) thought they saw?" "How did you figure that?" "How did you do that?" "How does that fit with what she just said?" "Could you give an example?" The responses that teachers and students give to each other might have the form of: "I don't quite get it." "It doesn't make sense (to me)." "I don't really get that; could you explain it another way?" Hence, most important: It is the students who make sense and understand by trying out their ideas, explaining them to others, and seeing how this holds up in other people's and their own eyes and in the light of the phenomena itself. (Duckworth, 2002)
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