User:KYPark/1969

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Herbert Blumer[edit]

Symbolic Interaction: Perspective and Method

Robert Fairthorne[edit]

Content Analysis, Specification and Control
Annual Review of Information Science and Technology, vol. 4, pp. 73-109

Manfred Kochen[edit]

Stability in the Growth of Knowledge
American Documentation, 20(3): 186-197. [1]
  • ``Priority is given to evaluation and synthesis above access.``
  • ``Cassidy ... [1] draws a distinction between knowledge, understanding, and wisdom. He points out that, while knowledge results from analytic activity, understanding results from synthetic activity, such as the invention of a connection between apples and planets.[2] [...] He stresses that "fragmentation of knowledge and experience opposes wisdom; excessive specialization, while it may give deep understanding, does not confer wisdom."`` (p. 192)
  • ``I have tried to demonstrate that a new scientific discipline is emerging. We might call it epistemo-dynamics. It is concerned with lawful regularities governing the acquisition of information and its transformation into knowledge, the assimilation of knowledge into understanding, the fusion of understanding into wisdom. These dynamic processes are presumed to occur in nature, of which evolving man and his societies are part. Nature, in its wisdom to date, has always evolved enough self-regulating mechanisms to ensure stability at all levels.``

Eugene Nida[edit]

The Theory and Practice of Translation
with Charles R. Taber
Brill Publishers

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Cassidy, H. G., "Liberation and Limitation," in: Sweeney, S. (ed.) The Knowledge Explosion: Liberation and Limitation, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, New York, 1966, p. 188.
  2. ^ This refers, of course, to the story by which Newton may have hit upon the law of universal gravitation during that summer when, at age 21, because Cambridge University was closed due to the plague and he had to while away his time at home, he discovered the telescope, the law of gravitation and the use of fluxions (differential calculus). The association between an apple falling from a tree or from heights visible only by telescope, and the moon, is not so far-fetched.
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