User:KYPark/2000

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John Brown[edit]

The Social Life of Information
(with Paul Duguid)
John Seely Brown Symposium on Technology and Society
The first held at the University of Michigan School of Information (the subsequent: 2002, 2006, 2008)

Barry Buzan[edit]

The Mind Map Book

James Gillies[edit]

How the Web was Born: The Story of the World Wide Web
Oxford University Press, 2000 (with Robert Cailliau)
Dedicated: To the Memory of Mike Sendall and Donald Davies
  • ``The World Wide Web is like an encyclopaedia, a telephone directory, a record collection, a video shop, and Speakers' Corner all rolled into one and accessible through any computer. It has become so successful that to many it is synonymous with the Internet; but in reality the two are quite different. The Internet is like a network of electronic roads criss-crossing the planet -- the much-hyped information superhighway. The Web is just one of many services using that network, just as many different kinds of vehicle use the roads. On the Internet, the Web just happens to be by far the most popular. The arrival of the Web in 1990 was to the Internet like the arrival of the internal combustion engine to the country lane. Internet transport would never be the same again.`` (opening paragraph, p. 1)
  • Cf. Tim Berners-Lee (1999) Weaving the Web: The Original Design and Ultimate Destiny of the World Wide Web (with Mark Fischetti and Michael L. Dertouzos)
  • Cf. What Are We Calling This Thing? (Chapter 5) [2]
  • Cf. Amazon.com [3]

Robert Jacobson[edit]

Information Design
(ed.) amazon.com
Foreword -- Richard Saul Wurman
  1. Introduction: Why information Design Matters -- Robert Jacobson
  2. Information Design: The Emergence of a New Profession -- Robert E. Horn
  3. Chaos, Order, and Sense-Making: A Proposed Theory for Information Design -- Brenda Dervin
  4. Human-Centered Design -- Mike Cooley
  5. Sign-Posting Information Design -- Romedi Passini
  6. The Uniquesness of Individual Perception -- Roger Whitehouse
  7. Information Design in Informal Settings: Museums and Other Public Spaces -- C. G. Screven
  8. Graphic Tools for Thinking, Planning and Problem Solving -- Yvonne M. Hansen
  9. Visual Design in Three Dimensions -- Hal Thwaites
  10. Collaborative Information Design: Seattle's Modern Odyssey -- Judy Anderson
  11. Information Interaction Design -- Nathan Shedroff
  12. Interactivity and Meaning -- Sheryl Macy, Elizabeth Anderson, and John Krygier
  13. The Role of Ambiguity in Multimedia Experience -- Jim Gasperini
  14. Sculpting in Zeroes and Ones -- Steve Holtzman
  15. Personal Reflection on the Development of Cyberspace -- Simon Birrell
  16. Rationalizing Information Representation -- Jep Raskin

Norman Johnson[edit]

Subplane Covered Nets
Google book

Shalom Lappin[edit]

The Structure of Unscientific Revolutions
Natural Language and Linguistic Theory 18: 665–671 (with Robert Levine and David Johnson)
  • ... Lappin et al. argue that the Minimalist Program is a radical departure from earlier Chomskian linguistic practice, but is not motivated by any new empirical discoveries, but rather by a general appeal to "perfection" which is both empirically unmotivated and so vague as to be unfalsifiable. They compare the adoption of this paradigm by linguistic researchers to other historical paradigm shifts in natural sciences and conclude that the adoption of the Minimalist Program has been an "unscientific revolution", driven primarily by Chomsky's authority in linguistics. The several replies to the article in Natural Language and Linguistic Theory Volume 18 number 4 (2000) make contradictory defenses of the Minimalist Program, some claiming that it is not in fact revolutionary or not in fact widely adopted, while others concede these points but defend the vagueness of its formulation as not problematic.

Robert Putnam[edit]

Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community
Simon & Schuster, New York

Robertson[edit]

Stephen E. Robertson

Salton Award Lecture on theoretical argument in information retrieval
ACM SIGIR Forum, Volume 34 Issue 1, April 2000. ACM

Jorgen Sandberg[edit]

Understanding Human Competence at Work: An Interpretative Approach
Academy of Management Journal, 2000, vol. 43, no. 1, pp. 9-25.
http://www.lerenvandocenten.nl/files/sandberg.pdf
http://74.125.155.132/scholar?q=cache:QeqEojtpc5sJ:scholar.google.com/&hl=en&as_sdt=2000
  • Human competence to optimize the heat engine in analogy to the information search engine
  • Compare three "conceptions" with M.E. Maron (1977)
    1. "separate qualities" vs. "Retrieval-about" (lexicographic)
    2. "interactive qualities" vs. "Objective-about" (syntactic)
    3. "customer's perspective" vs. "Subjective-about" (pragmatic)
  • Refer to contextualist "References" (p. 24).

Stiglitz[edit]

Joseph E. Stiglitz (2000).
The Contributions of the economics of information to twentieth century economics. The Quarterly Journal of Economics, November 2000, 1441-1478.
http://www.eui.eu/Personal/Courty/Stglitz2000.pdf

Willinsky[edit]

John Willinsky (2000).
If Only We Knew: Increasing the Public Value of Social Science Research. Routledge. ISBN 0415926521, 9780415926522

http://books.google.com/books?id=QeO54jEpEOUC

References[edit]

  • The University of Pennsylvania awarded two out of six honorary degrees [4] to Mary Douglas and Ronald Dworkin, both the Anglo-American Oxonian wizards of worldwide worth, while working at UCL. It is most likely UCL that it did such a coincidental and exceptional favor, judging from the fact that UCL is focal or local in the sense of closer, or far narrower than Oxonians and Anglo-Americans.

    Another fact is that both are interpretivist! "Mary Douglas is best known for her interpretation of the book of Leviticus" (as per Mary Douglas), and that "Dworkin's theory is 'interpretive'" (as per Ronald Dworkin). Their interpretivism was evident from Mary Douglas (1975) Implicit Meanings and Ronald Dworkin (1977) Taking Rights Seriously, that is, the start of interpretivism (legal). Note that "interpretivism" presupposes "implicit meanings" and that "implicit meanings" entails "interpretivism", so that the ideas of both refer to the same thing.

    Perhaps the more famous instance of interpretivism would be "implicature" and the like, put forward by such Oxonians as Paul Grice (1975) and John Searle (1975) at UC Berkeley. Meaning co-authored by Michael Polanyi and Harry Prosch is still another significant Oxonian instance of interpretivism. What a likely Oxonian conspiracy starting from 1975, regardless of more instances! Just deny if no doubt whatsoever! Oxford is in watershed. Perhaps, honesty may be the best policy, from now on. Dishonesty may be fatal.

    Ordinary language philosophy (OLP) is only roughly Oxonian. Roughly it rose from P. F. Strawson (1950) "On Referring" attacking Bertrand Russell (1905) "On Denoting". Between them were Ludwig Wittgenstein's Tractatus (1922) and C. K. Ogden & I. A. Richards's The Meaning of Meaning (1923). (Ogden translated Tractatus!) Ogden et al. (1923) was to overcome Wittgenstein (1922), who denounced Ogden's (1923) but renounced his own (1922) on the other hand so as to shift to Philosophical Investigations (1953) that was postumously edited by an Oxonian, G. E. M. Anscombe, later viewed as "later Wittgenstein" and now often even as the father of OLP. To be honest, however, this is along Ogden's line of thought (1923) he definitely denounced before!

    Ogden died in 1957. It is a great irony that Richards soon joined Bertrand Russell and Karl Popper in supporting Ernest Gellner (1959) Words and Things aiming to attack Oxonian OLP that was essentially along Ogden's & his own line of thought (1923), not to mention Wittgenstein's (1953). Richards's notion of close reading was breaking with the holist revolution of Ogden & Richards (1923) and degenerating into the Cambridge tradition of analytic philosophy, scientism, logical atomism and positivism, as championed by Bertrand Russell and early Wittgenstein.

Footnotes


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