User:Kew Gardens 613/List of closed New York City Subway entrances

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Closed staircase at Marcy Avenue and Willoughby Street.

This is a list of New York City Subway entrances that have been closed, demolished, or were planned to be closed, and those that have been reopened. This list does not include entrances to stations that have been closed or for stations that have been demolished. Many entrances were closed between the 1970s and 1990s due to legitimate crime concerns, due to low ridership, and to cut costs. As crime has decreased, and as ridership has gone up, these entrances, for the most part have not been revisited. During some station renovation projects, closed entrances have been reopened.

Much of this information comes from websites such as stationreporter.net (now defunct), subwaynut.com, nycsubway.org, and personal observations, whether they are images or memories of using the entrances in question. This list is on Wikipedia–a subpage of my userpage–so that this list can be crowdsourced and can be easily added to, and with citations. One of the goals of this list is to migrate the information from here to the relevant articles once they are sufficiently referenced. Another main purpose is to eventually create an article in the mainspace, which would require a lot of research. Proper citations would be appreciated, whether they are newspaper articles detailing their closure, New York City Transit Authority (NYCTA) documentation, or images showing their existence. Additional information would be appreciated, including additional locations where closed entrances are located, the locations of demolished/removed entrances, more specific locational information including street corners and on mezzanine, the existence of entrances to private buildings and underground passageways connecting stations, and dates when the entrances in question closed, and if possible, why they closed.

In response to a request made by State Senator Martin Dilan, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) stated that 119 stations either had a closed street stair or closed control area, and that 130 stations had closed entrances. Within these 130 stations, there are 114 closed control areas and 298 closed street stairs. 188 of these were connected to closed control areas, with the remainder connected to control areas that remain open.[1]

History[edit]

Closings: pre-1970[edit]

Stations built by the Independent Subway System are widely considered to be overbuilt with large mezzanines, multiple entrances, and entrances at every corner of an intersection. Due to lower ridership, several entrances were closed soon after they opened, or, in some cases, were never opened for use. For instance the entrances at 118th Street and Frederick Douglass Boulevard at the 116th Street station were already closed by 1967.

Closings: 1970s–1990s[edit]

Background[edit]

Between the 1970s and 1990s, the New York City Transit Authority (NYCTA), closed dozens of subway entrances throughout the system due to steep declines in the system's ridership and to improve security. Many of the entrances closed were located out of view of token booth clerks, or were accessed by winding, narrow passageways that made them prone to crime. Entrances that were closed were decided upon to have the least impact on additional walking times, and on ridership. Many of the closed entrances were part-time entrances. These changes were often made in conjunction with station rehabilitation projects, such as the renovation of stations under the Station Modernization Program and Station Renovation Program during the late 1980s and early 1990s. In other cases, entrances were closed at the request of local communities or were closed in response to crimes that occurred in these areas. In some cases, entrances that were initially slated for closure were kept open with other entrances closed instead. Many closed entrances are equipped with electromagnetic sensors so that they can be unlocked by station agents in case of emergencies. Currently, there are no plans to reopen entrances closed during this time period.

1970s[edit]

In the last years of Mayor John Lindsay's administration more than 200 entrances, most of which were infrequently used, were closed for portions of the day or entirely to reduce costs by closing token booths.[2] Dozens of subway entrances were closed in 1976 and 1977 as part of service cuts. On March 16, 1977, the New York State Assembly passed legislation preventing the NYCTA from closing any more entrances, or limiting the hours, without public notice and public hearings.[3] The signing of this piece of legislation, and community objections due to longer walking distances, made it hard to close additional entrances.[2]

April 1979–NYCTA plan with Mayor Ed Koch

1980s[edit]

In September 1980, transit police chief James Meehan, ordered his commanders of the anti-crime unit to review all subway entrances and recommend the closing of some. In the previous two years, only a few entrances were closed because the NYCTA was hesitant to recommend more because of the bureaucratic hurdles requires to do so. Transit police said that at every subway station with three or more entrances, at least one entrances is more crime-prone and should be closed during a portion of the day. More than a year prior, the transit police had identified 10 or 11 entrances to be closed. The first new entrance to be closed was the entrance to the northeast corner of Eighth Avenue and 42nd Street. As part of upcoming station renovation projects, the MTA planned to eliminate blind stairways and nooks to create clear sightlines between both ends of subway platforms and from token booths to entrances.[2]

Modernization Program[edit]

As part of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA)'s 1982–1991 Capital Program, funding was provided for security, which was used to create off-hour waiting areas, install security mirrors in stations, eliminate cul-de-sacs in stations, and close unused station entrances and exits.[4] During the 1980s and 1990s, the MTA held legally-required public hearings to discuss its proposed modifications to station control areas, including the removal of token booths, modifications to the fare control line, the closure of entrances at night, and the closure of entrances entirely. The criteria used to determine which entrances to close included existing counts, tokens sold, entrance capacity, distance to the nearest full time booth, fare registrations, senior citizen patronage, station location and the ongoing development of the surrounding area.[5]


[6]

1979 CTD.

On September 17, 1981, a public hearing was held to discuss the reduction of weekend hours at 64 token booths.[7] On November 19, 1981, a public hearing was held to discuss changes to the 125th Street station as part of its modernization. The exits at the southern corners of 127th Street and St. Nicholas Avenue would have been closed, and closed entrances at the northwestern and southeastern corners of 126th Street and St. Nicholas Avenue would have been reopened to replace these entrances. These changes were never completed.[8] TOKEN

On August 31, 1982, a public hearing was held to discuss changes to the 34th Street–Herald Square station to be made as part of the station's renovation. The entrance at the northeast corner of 32nd Street and Broadway would be closed and replaced by a new entrance on the east side of Broadway north of 32nd Street.[9]

On September 28, 1982, a public hearing was held to discuss a change in the hours of operation of an entrance at the Cortlandt Street station. Between 7:30 p.m. and 6:00 a.m., Mondays through Thursdays, and from 7:30 p.m. on Friday to 6:00 a.m. on Monday, the southern entrance to the World Trade Center Concourse from the southbound platform and from the northbound platform via an underpass would be closed.[10]

On October 21, 1982, a public hearing was held to discuss access changes at the 74th Street—Broadway and Hunters Point Avenue stations to be made as part of the Station Modernization Program. At 74th Street, staircases on the east side of Broadway at Roosevelt Avenue were to be replaced by an escalator, and new stairs were to be built around the corner on the south side of Roosevelt Avenue. At Hunters Point Avenue, the entrance at 49th Avenue east of 21st Street was to be closed.[11]

On December 28, 1982, a public hearing was held to discuss changes to the Hoyt Street station to be made as part of the Station Modernization Program. As a security measure, the NYCTA planned to close the passageway between the entrance to the Abraham and Strauss Store, 501 Fulton Street, which was located at the western end of the southbound platform and the northbound platform, the stairway between the passageway and the northbound platform, and the exit to 501 Fulton Street.[12]

1982[13][14]

On February 28, 1985, a public hearing was held to discuss the planned closure of the entrance at the southwest corner of Lafayette Avenue and South Portland Avenue at the Fulton Street station.[15] FEB

1987

On January 7, 1988, a public hearing was held to discuss 41 changes in station access, including the closing of entrances the corner of Nassau Street and Beekman Street.[16]

On February 16 and March 2, 1989, public hearings were held to discuss plans to modify station access at ten stations, including the closure of entrances at Fordham Road, 182nd–183rd Streets, and at 155th Street. At Fordham Road, exits at the northwest and southwest corners of Fordham Road and Grand Concourse and the 400 foot (120 m)-long passageway connecting to the control area at 188th Street were to be closed because the passageway was "an invitation to crime". These areas had only been open between 6 a.m. and 9 p.m.[17]

1991–1992[edit]

On March 20, 1991, a woman was raped behind a pile of debris the subway passageway connecting the 34th Street–Herald Square and 42nd Street–Bryant Park stations under Sixth Avenue during rush hour, which had entrances at 38th Street. This was the longest passageway in the system. Other commuters passed nearby but were unaware of what was happening. That passageway was closed the day after. It was used by 400 daily riders[18] and recorded 30 felonies since January 1, 1990. In response, on March 28, 1991, the NYCTA ordered the closing of the 15 most dangerous passageways in the system within a week, which the Transit Police and citizen advocacy groups had called for since the previous year. A women was raped in the passageway in July 1990 with no response, but after another rape took place in August, the passageway's closure was called for by the local community board in September when a women was raped in this passageway. Bureaucratic delays had prevented their closure, with their presentation to the MTA Board not scheduled until April 1991, after a public hearing on systemwide service reduction was to be held. The agency feared that closing the passageway without public comment would have caused an outcry for advocates for the homeless.[19] The NYCTA's director of public information said that the agency had erred in waiting for formal approval. The locations were chosen based on crime volume, lighting, traffic and physical layout. These entrances were closed under the declaration of a public safety emergency, and sere blocked off with plywood and fencing until public hearings were held and official permission was obtained.[20] By closing the entrances, the transit police could deploy many officers to other parts of the system.

One of the entrances closed in 1991 at the Ralph Avenue station.

The nine stations affected in Manhattan were Canal Street with 83 felonies since January 1, 1990, 23rd Street with 46, 28th Street with 43, 50th Street with 94, Grand Central with 365, 14th Street with 125, Fifth Avenue–59th Street with 79, 110th Street with 52, and 168th Street with 54. The four stations in Brooklyn were Hoyt–Schermerhorn Streets with 88, DeKalb Avenue with 105, Ralph Avenue with 53, and Nostrand Avenue with 96. The one station in Queens was Woodhaven Boulevard with 30, and the one in the Bronx was Fordham Road with 79.[21] The areas closed included crossovers between uptown and downtown platforms, some high-entry turnstiles, little-used staircases to the street, and entrances at token booths scheduled to be closed.[22]

A public hearing was held on October 19, 1992 and community information forums were held the following day as the MTA proposed to close high-entry turnstiles at 81 locations, and to close or restrict access to lightly used high-exit turnstiles, staircases and passageways at 15 locations to increase operating efficiency and to increase customer security.[23]

During the 1990s, New York City Transit undertook the Station Rehabilitation Program to renovate entire stations with additional customer amenities, modernized infrastructure, improved appearance, and operational improvements. As part of the Station Rehabilitation Program in the 1990s, station layouts were modified to fix safety, operating and/or service problems, requiring the closing, relocation or reducing the hours of secondary entrances. The changes, in addition to improve customer experience and security, were intended to reduce station operating costs. The changes generally consolidated fare control areas, reduced what the agency deemed to be "excessive mezzanine areas," modified or closed passageways and staircases with poor sight-lines and large areas outside of fare control. The renovations sought to modify station layouts so that secondary station elements were only open when well utilized, to keep riders from being vulnerable.[24]

1993-1996[edit]

On June 28, 1993, a public hearing was held to discuss proposed access changes at the 14th Street/Eighth Avenue station and eight other stations. These changes were intended to maintain a balance between station operating costs, security and customer convenience. NYCT believed that station access needed to be shift to take into account changes in ridership. The changes at 14th Street were to be made as part of the station's renovation. After extensive dialogue with the local community, NYCT proposed modifying the station layout to increase station operating efficiency, to improve customer convenience and security. As part of the plan, NYCT proposed consolidating the three token booths at the station (full-time booths at 14th Street and 15th Street and a part-time booth at 16th Street) into two full-time booths at 14th Street and 16th Street. The staircases at 16th Street would be open full-time, and two new staircases would be built on the northern corners of Eighth Avenue and 16th Street facing south. In addition, virtually all free-zone passageways would be eliminated and the number of street stairs to the mezzanine were to be reduced. In order to reduce congestion in the transfer passageway, it would be widened and a street stair would be moved. By eliminating almost all of the free-zone passageways, which were not in the view of the token booths, "the opportunity for rules violations and vandalism" would be limited. The changes were expected to save $50,000 annually due to the closure of a token booth.

In response to requests by the local community, the proposal was modified to retain the staircases at 15th Street for exiting between 6 a.m. and 9 p.m.. via high exit turnstiles, as opposed to removing them, and an entry staircase on the north side of 14th Street, and to have a continuous mezzanine within fare control between the 14th Street and 16th Street ends of the station. In addition, the exits at the southern corners of 17th Street and Eighth Avenue (S9 and S10), which had been open daily between 6 a.m. and 11 p.m. were closed, requiring 6,400 riders to walk 200 feet (61 m) to use the entrances at 16th Street. This entrance was closed because the staircases were isolated and connected to the rest of the station by a block-long passageway out of fare control, which was conducive to crime and vandalism. NYCT did not consider the retention of these entrances to save any walking effort, only weather-protection, because the token booth would be at 16th Street. Additionally, the staircase at the northeastern corner of 14th Street and Eighth Avenue, S2, was to be made exit-only, and was reconfigured to provide improved sightlines and to improve the transfer passageway in the station. However, this was later changed, with the exit being completely closed because its relocation was infeasible due to the presence of underground utility lines. Another change NYCT made was to relocate stair S1 at the northwestern corner of Eighth Avenue and 14th Street around the corner to face north on Eighth Avenue rather than west on 14th Street to provide room for a new elevator; initially this exit was going to be removed. However, this was changed again, with the elevator moved further west on 14th Street to provide adequate sidewalk space, allowing S1 to stay in place. The relocation of the elevator eliminated the community's concern that it visually impacted two adjacent landmarked buildings. One alternative plan to reconfigure the station would have placed the second full-time booth between 15th and 16th Streets or between 16th and 17th Street, which would have increased access points, but decreased inherent security, while another would have kept a third part-time booth. The staircases at the south end of the 8th Avenue platforms were widened.

In May 1994, a public hearing was held to discuss thirteen station access changes at 10 stations. Four of the stations (66th Street—Lincoln Center, 14th Street—Union Square, Chambers Street/World Trade Center/Park Place, and Main Street) were in the design phases of their rehabilitations. The relocations of entrances at two of these stations (66th Street and Main Street) were intended to facilitate the installation of escalators and elevators. The changes at the six stations not in the rehabilitation program were intended to improve security or relieve congestion by closing lightly-used areas. These recommendations, with the exception of the changes at Queens Plaza, which received significant opposition, were forwarded to the MTA Board for approval in July 1994. These changes were expected to increase operation costs by $234,000 per year due to a net increase in token booth hours.

A request for a public hearing to discuss thirteen changes to be made at eight stations (Inwood—207th Street, 5th Avenue, Times Square/42nd Street, 34th Street—Penn Station, 33rd Street, 46th Street, Jackson Heights/Roosevelt Avenue and Metropolitan Avenue/Lorimer Street) as part of the Station Rehabilitation Program was put up to a vote by the MTA Board in December 1995, with public hearings scheduled for January or February 1996. The changes were estimated to reduce operating costs by $84,000, lower than the initial estimate of $245,000 stated in the initial notification of the hearing in November due to more accurate cost estimates. The public hearing for these changes took place on April 23, 1996, but by this point, the proposed changes at Jackson Heights/Roosevelt Avenue were dropped.

2000s[edit]

After the September 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, some entrances at stations in Lower Manhattan near the World Trade Center site or institutions deemed as critical, such as the New York Stock Exchange, were closed for security reasons.

  • Broad Street

Reopening of entrances with higher ridership[edit]

Closed entrance at West 71st Street and Central Park West.

In recent years, New York City Transit has evaluated the reopening of selected closed entrances in order to reduce travel times, by reducing in-station congestion and walking times. The reopening of station entrances has been hindered by the Federal Transit Administration's new interpretation of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), which was that reopening these entrances at stations not in compliance with the ADA would require the construction of elevators or ramps for this part of the station, which in NYCT's view, outweighs the cost of upgrading the station. However, Section 202.4 in the 2010 ADA Standards has a 20% threshold, which could be used as an indication that prohibitive amounts of money are not needed to reopen closed entrances. The reopening of entrances would often require substantial construction and would cost a significant amount due to the need to relocate New York City Transit facilities and equipment, to provide additional egress, or due to changing land use. In other cases, reopening entrances would only require uncovering a stair, rehabilitating the area, and installing fare control devices. Some entrances likely cannot be reopened because they would not be compliant with NFPA guidelines on station egress times. However, opening others could ensure compliance with these regulations.

Reopening of entrance at 70th Street and Central Park West, at Lorimer Street, and at South Portland Avenue and Lafayette Avenue.

The MTA's 2015–2034 Twenty-Year Capital Assessment, suggested the reopening of closed subway entrances as an approach to improve station access and passenger flow.[25]

[26][27][28][29]

Station renovations[edit]

Mosholu Parkway

Fourth Avenue/Ninth Street

104th Street

Broadway

A and C Line Review[edit]

On December 11, 2015, New York City Transit released its Review of the A and C Lines, and among the various aspects discussed, the report discussed the option of reopening closed station entrances along these lines. The study found that many stations along the two routes had closed staircases, with some closed in the 1980s due to high crime and low ridership, with others closed for much longer. The study recommended reopening closed entrances at Classon Avenue at the Franklin Avenue station, at 167th Street at the 168th Street station and 51st Street at the 50th Street station in the southbound direction if funding was identified. The cost of reopening these entrances was estimated to be between $2.7 million and $10.6 million. These stations were already ADA compliant, making work at these locations relatively cost-effective. The report concluded that if additional capital funding was provided, or if the FTA's interpretation of the ADA reverted its original flexible approach, reopening entrances at many stops along Central Park West, at Spring Street, Nostrand Avenue, and Hoyt-Schermerhorn Streets, all non-ADA accessible stops, would become more feasible. The report included a non-comprehensive list of closed street stairs that lead to closed entry areas, not all street stairs closed. Staircases deemed to have limited potential utility were not included on the list.[30]

The line review included a case study, evaluating the reopening of entrances at the Nostrand Avenue station, which is not ADA-accessible. The station has two sets of closed entrances and the exits at Nostrand Avenue and Fulton Street are overcrowded. The case study found that reopening the closed Bedford Avenue entrance would reduce uneven loading on A and C trains and would ease congestion at the Nostrand entrance, in addition to cutting the walking distance for riders going to and from areas west of Nostrand Avenue, including bus riders. It also found that reopening an entrance at Fulton Street and Arlington Place to the northbound platform would provide similar benefits at a lower cost.[30]

Canarsie Shutdown[edit]

Ribbon-cutting for the reopening of entrances at Powers Street and Hope Street and the Metropolitan Avenue station.

Starting in 2015, a group of local residents from Northern Brooklyn began pushing the MTA to reopen closed station entrances in their neighborhoods, including Alan Minor.[31]

In 2016, plans to completely shutdown the 14th Street Tunnel shutdown for 18 months, later reduced to 15 months were announced, which would have temporarily eliminated L train service between Eighth Avenue in Manhattan and Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn. Riders were expected to use the G, J/Z and M instead. Therefore, the agency planned to reopen or expand more than 24 station staircases in order to handle the expected increase in riders at these stations. All improvements to stations were to be permanent. In January 2019, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced that a shutdown would not take place, with work being done overnights and weekends, allowing service to run through the tunnels at all times. Even though other parts of the mitigation plans, including the operation of busway along 14th Street, and the operation of full-length G trains, were removed from the plan, the reopening of entrances was maintained as part of the plan.[32][33]

[34]

On July 1, 2017, the entrances to the Flushing Avenue station on the east corners of Fayette Street were reopened to handle crowding from the 14th Street Tunnel Closure and the Myrtle Avenue Line rehabilitation project. On November 16, 2018, the entrances to the Hewes Street station at Hewes Street were similarly reopened. On February 28, 2019, the exits at Powers Street and Union Avenue and Hope Street and Union Avenue reopened.[35][36] However, NYCT did not reopen closed exits at the south end of the station leading to Grand Street.

On February 11, 2019, the entrance to the Eighth Avenue station on the east side of Seventh Avenue was reopened to handle increased ridership at the station, as the station was being renovated. As part of the renovation project, the station is becoming ADA-accessible.

Lists[edit]

Reopened entrances[edit]

As part of some station rehabilitation projects, closed subway entrances have been reopened. Reopening a subway entrance requires bringing stairs up to existing standards, including adding treads to them and evening them out. Turnstiles, security camera, signage, fare machines and Help Points also have to be installed.[37]

Station Division Line Borough Location Date closed Date Reopened Reason for Reopening ADA Accessible?
Eighth Avenue B (BMT) Sea Beach Line Brooklyn East side of Seventh Avenue, at 62nd Street 1974[38] February 11, 2019[39] Station renovation No; In progress
Flushing Avenue B (BMT) Jamaica Line Brooklyn Both eastern corners of Fayette Street and Broadway c. 1985[31] July 1, 2017[31] M train shutdown Yes
Hewes Street Northwestern corner of Montrose Avenue and Broadway[40]
Southeastern corner of Hewes Street and Broadway[41]
November 16, 2018[42][43][44] L train shutdown No
Metropolitan Avenue B (IND) Crosstown Line Brooklyn Northeastern corner of Powers Street and Union Avenue[45][46]
  • Exit-only staircase[46]
  • Done to improve security by concentrating riders at the full-time booth at Metropolitan Avenue[46]
  • 300 daily riders (at this exit, at Hope Street and Grand Street) would have been required to walk an additional 500 feet (150 m)[46]
  • Closed in 2000 during a station renovation project[46]

Northwestern corner of Hope Street and Union Avenue[45][46]
  • Exit-only staircase[46]
  • Done to improve security by concentrating riders at the full-time booth at Metropolitan Avenue[46]
  • 300 daily riders (at this exit, at Powers Street and Grand Street) would have been required to walk an additional 500 feet (150 m)[46]
  • Closed in 2000 during a station renovation project[46]
c. 1999-2001 February 28, 2019[47][48][35] L train shutdown No; planned
Fulton Street Southwest corner of South Portland Avenue and Lafayette Avenue (Entrance S8-M10)[49] (N422A and N422B) c. 1985[49] July 2005 (northbound)
c. 2009 (southbound)[50]
Community pressure[51] No
Fourth Avenue/Ninth Street B (IND) Culver Line Brooklyn East side of Fourth Avenue, between 9th and 10th Streets[52] February 23, 2012[53] Station renovation No
Lorimer Street B (BMT) Jamaica Line Brooklyn Western corners of Broadway and Wallabout Street early 2000s No
59th Street–Columbus Circle A (IRT)/

B (IND)

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line

Eighth Avenue Line

Manhattan West side of 60th Street and Central Park West 1990s[57] Expansion of Transit Police District Yes
72nd Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan Southwestern corner of 70th Street and Central Park West c. 2001[58] No
Astor Place A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan Now a Kmart entrance to the downtown platform c. 2000[59] Opening of Kmart No
104th Street B (IND) Fulton Street Line Queens Both western corners of Liberty Avenue and 102nd Street[30] Pre-1985[60] 2014–2015 Station renovation No
Mosholu Parkway A (IRT) Jerome Avenue Line The Bronx Northern corners of Mosholu Parkway South and Jerome Avenue[61] January 2008 Station renovation No; planned
Broadway/Lafayette Street/

Bleecker Street

B (IND)

A (IRT)

Sixth Avenue Line

Lexington Avenue Line

Manhattan Eastern mezzanine to:
  • Southeastern corner of Lafayette Street and Houston Street (1)
  • Northwestern corner of Mulberry Street and Houston Street (1)
2011-2012 Station expansion project Yes

Closed street entrances[edit]

Station Division Line Borough Location/Quantity[a] Ridership (2017)[62] Ridership rank out of 425 (2017)[62] Number of exit points ADA Accessible?
45th Street B (BMT) Fourth Avenue Line Brooklyn Southwestern corner of 46th Street and Fourth Avenue (southbound only) (1)[63]
  • Closed after being destroyed in an accident from nearby construction workers. Community Board 7 held a meeting to determine whether residents wanted the entrance closed (board's chairman wanted it to be sealed up), and the entrance was closed at the board's request in 1979.[64][65]
2,390,684 205 1 No
Atlantic Avenue–Barclays Center A (IRT)

B (BMT)

Eastern Parkway
Fourth Avenue Line
Brighton Line
Brooklyn South side of Flatbush Avenue, between Atlantic Avenue and Pacific Street (IRT only)[66] (1)
  • May have never been opened - emergency exits only.[67]

Both northern corners of Atlantic Avenue and Fourth Avenue (2)
13,571,093 21 Yes
Atlantic Avenue B (BMT) Canarsie Line Brooklyn Southeast corner of East New York Avenue and Van Sinderen Avenue[68] (1) 557,103 403 1 No
Avenue M B (BMT) Brighton Line Brooklyn North side of Avenue M (southbound only) (1)
  • Used as an "emergency" exit
1,828,941 261 1 (2 for northbound) No
Avenue U North end of southbound platform to south side of Avenue U (1)
  • Used as an "emergency" exit
2,360,833 210 1 No
Bedford–Nostrand Avenues B (IND) Crosstown Line Brooklyn Both western corners of Bedford Avenue and Lafayette Avenue (2)
  • Closed between 2000 and 2008.
  • Between November 2016[69] and September 2017[70] these entrances were boarded up; there was nothing blocking people from going down the staircase beforehand[71]

Both eastern corners of Nostrand Avenue and Lafayette Avenue (2)[72]
  • Still exist at street level, but are boarded up by adjacent property owners
2,779,124 186 2 No
Bergen Street A (IRT) Eastern Parkway Line Brooklyn Northwestern corner of 6th Avenue and Bergen Street (1) 1,180,684 331 No
Bergen Street B (IND) Culver Line Brooklyn Southwestern corner of Warren Street and Smith Street[73] (1) 3,525,144 143 No
Borough Hall/Court Street A (IRT)

B (BMT)

Eastern Parkway Line

Fourth Avenue Line

Brooklyn North side of Montague Street between Clinton Street and Court Street (1)
Southwest corner of Joralemon Street and Court Street (1)
(missing one more)
10,693,598 28 Partially (Excluding BMT and Downtown Eastern Parkway Line); Downtown Eastern Parkway planned
Broad Channel

B (IND)

Rockaway Line Queens East side of West Road at East 6th Road No
Broadway B (IND) Crosstown Line Brooklyn Northwestern corner of Johnson Avenue and Union Avenue (1)
  • Possibly closed 1998-1999.

All corners of South 5th Street/Montrose Avenue and Union Avenue except southwestern corner (3)
  • Possibly closed 1998-1999.

Both northern corners of South 4th Street/Meserole Street and Union Avenue (for unfinished station) (2)
1,385,797 312 1 No
Broadway Junction B (BMT/IND) Jamaica Line

Canarsie Line

Fulton Street Line

Brooklyn Both eastern corners of Eastern Parkway and Broadway[74] (2)
  • Stair to southeastern corner removed
2,911,532 179 1 No; planned
Carroll Street B (IND) Culver Line Brooklyn Northeastern 3rd Street and Smith Street (1)
Southwestern corner of 2nd Place and Smith Street (1)
3,537,661 142 2 No
Chauncey Street B (BMT) Jamaica Line Brooklyn Southwestern corner of Marion Street and Broadway (1)
Northwestern corner of Pilling Street and Broadway (1)
1,095,638 340 1 No
Church Avenue B (BMT) Brighton Line Brooklyn East side of East 18th Street between Church Avenue and Caton Avenue (southbound only) (1) 5,455,527 83 2 No; planned
Church Avenue A (IRT) Nostrand Avenue Line Brooklyn Second staircase to northeastern corner of Church Avenue and Nostrand Avenue (northbound only) (1) 2,916,680 178 1 Yes
DeKalb Avenue B (BMT) Fourth Avenue Line
Brighton Line
Brooklyn 340 Flatbush Avenue Extension (1)
  • Likely closed in 1991[22]
  • Temporarily reopened in 2003 during the station's renovation

Southeastern corner of Willoughby Street and Flatbush Avenue Extension (1)

  • Likely closed in 1991[22]
Yes
Eastern Parkway–Brooklyn Museum A (IRT) Eastern Parkway Line Brooklyn Western mezzanine on Eastern Parkway (2)[72][75]
  • Currently used as emergency exits
1,530,635 301 1 No; In progress
Flushing Avenue B (IND) Crosstown Line Brooklyn Mezzanine to southern corners of Walton Street and Union Avenue (2)
  • May have been closed in 1984 as Pfizer provided funding for improvements as part of the Adopt-A-Station Program
849,840 378 1 No
Fort Hamilton Parkway B (IND) Culver Line Brooklyn Northern corners of Prospect Avenue and Reeve Place (2) 1,786,458 267 No
Franklin Avenue–Fulton Street B (IND/BMT) Fulton Street Line

Franklin Avenue Line

Brooklyn Eastern corners of Classon Avenue and Fulton Street (2)[76][77][78]
  • To be reopened pending funding
2,058,258 239 1 Yes
Gates Avenue B (BMT) Jamaica Line Brooklyn Northwest corner of Palmetto Street and Broadway (1)
Southwest corner of Monroe Street and Broadway (1)
2,262,915 219 1 No
Halsey Street Eastern corners of Jefferson Avenue and Broadway (2)[79] 2,131,177 233 1 No
High Street B (IND) Fulton Street Line Brooklyn Washington Street (now Cadman Plaza East) (1)
Second staircase at Cadman Plaza West (1)
2,983,672 171 No
Hoyt Street A (IRT) Eastern Parkway Line Brooklyn Northwestern corner of Fulton Street and Duffield Street (1)
  • Closed before 2009.

Southeastern corner of Hoyt Street and Fulton Street (1)
2,137,478 232 No
Hoyt–Schermerhorn Streets B (IND) Crosstown Line

Fulton Street Line

Brooklyn

North and south sides of Schermerhorn Street, west of Hoyt Street (2)[76]


Northeastern corner of Bond Street and Schermerhorn Street (2)
Southeastern corner of Bond Street and Schermerhorn Street (1)
North side of Schermerhorn Street, between two open entrances near Hoyt Street (1)
Passageway from the Bond Street exit to southeastern corner of Bond Street and Livingston Street, to now-defunct Loeser's Department Store (2)
3,264,293 157 No; planned
Jay Street–MetroTech B (IND/BMT) Fulton Street Line

Culver Line

Fourth Avenue Line

Brooklyn Southern mezzanine to both southern corners of Fulton Street and Smith Street (2)[72][80] 13,007,176 22 Yes
Junius Street A (IRT) New Lots Line Brooklyn Eastern mezzanine to both western corners of Junius Street and Livonia Avenue; stairway to street removed (2) 298,119[b] 417 1 No; planned
Kosciuszko Street B (BMT) Jamaica Line Brooklyn Eastern corners of DeKalb Avenue and Broadway (2)[79] 1,979,192 248 1 No
Metropolitan Avenue/Lorimer Street B (IND/BMT) Crosstown Line

Canarsie Line

Brooklyn Passage to both northern corners of Grand Street and Union Avenue (IND only) (2)[81][46]
  • Exit-only staircases[46]
  • Done to improve security by concentrating riders at the full-time booth at Metropolitan Avenue[46]
  • 300 daily riders (at these exits and at Powers) would have been required to walk an additional 500 feet (150 m)
  • Closed in 2000 during a station renovation project[82][26][46]
  • Was a part-time entrance[26][46]

Southeastern corner of Union Avenue and Metropolitan Avenue, stair S8[46]
  • Closed during the 2000 station renovation project, the other staircase at this corner, which was perpendicular to this staircase was also supposed to be closed[46]
  • Intended to help reconfigure the mezzanine to improve the transfer at the station for 13,000 riders[46]
  • To improve the transfer, a connection would have needed to be created in the mezzanine by putting into place a corridor within fare control across the free zone that was served by the pairs of street staircases on both side of Union Avenue, requiring the closure of one pair. It was decided to close the eastern staircases because they were much less used than the western staircases and because having the booth located adjacent to the western pair would allow transfer movement to be done more smoothly.[83]
  • 1,400 daily riders would have been required to walk an additional 90 feet (27 m) to the exits on the west side[46]

Both western corners of Lorimer Street and Metropolitan Avenue (BMT only) (2)[84], stairs S3 and S4[46]
  • Closed in 2000 during a station renovation project[46]
  • Change made to improve security by concentrating riders at the well-used stairs at the eastern corners of the intersection[46]
  • 580 daily riders were required to walk an additional 70 feet (21 m)[46]
5,010,601 97 3 No; planned
Morgan Avenue B (BMT) Canarsie Line Brooklyn Northeastern corner of Morgan Avenue and Harrison Place (1) 2,594,607 195 2 No
Myrtle–Willoughby Avenues B (IND) Crosstown Line Brooklyn Willoughby Avenue and Marcy Avenue (2)
  • Northwest corner in the southbound direction; boarded up, entrance still exists at street level[85]
  • Southeast corner in the northbound direction; paved over
  • Closed c. 1976–1977
1,765,653 268 1 No
Nostrand Avenue B (IND) Fulton Street Line Brooklyn Northern corners of Arlington Place and Fulton Street (Manhattan-bound only) (2)
Mezzanine to both eastern corners of Bedford Avenue and Fulton Street (2)[86][87][88]
  • Did not open until 1950 (14 years after the station opened). The entrances were boarded up, and were only opened after a fight by the Bedford-Stuyvesant Neighborhood Council. After the decision to open it was announced, turnstiles and a change booth were installed in the entrance.[89]
  • Possibly closed in 1991.[22]
  • Reopening of one of the two entrances is recommended, but would require elevators and funding
5,823,419 76 1 No
Ralph Avenue B (IND) Fulton Street Line Brooklyn Both western corners of Howard Avenue and Fulton Street (2)
  • Closed in 1991[21]
  • The closed off staircase on the southwestern corner was removed between 2014 and 2016.[90][91][92]
  • The closed off staircase on the northwestern corner still exists and is boarded up.[93]

Southwestern corner of Ralph Avenue and Fulton Street (1)[94][95]


1,894,817 258 1 No
Rockaway Avenue B (IND) Fulton Street Line Brooklyn Both eastern corners of Thomas S Boyland Street and Fulton Street (2) 1,794,365 264 2 No
Seventh Avenue B (BMT) Brighton Line Brooklyn Both northern corners of Sterling Place and Flatbush Avenue (2)[61][96][97]:627[98] 5,105,535 90 1 No
Sutter Avenue B (BMT) Canarsie Line Brooklyn Belmont Avenue and Van Sinderen Avenue (3)[99] 1,394,283 311 1 No
14th Street/

Eighth Avenue

B (IND/BMT) Eighth Avenue Line

Canarsie Line

Manhattan Southern corners of 17th Street and Eighth Avenue (2)[76] 14,153,266 19 3 Yes
14th Street–Union Square A (IRT)

B (BMT)

Lexington Avenue Line
Broadway Line
Canarsie Line
Manhattan Southwestern corner of 14th Street and Broadway (1) 34,557,551 Partially (Except IRT)
23rd Street A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan Southwestern corner of 22nd Street and Park Avenue South (1) 8,265,227 42 2 Yes
28th Street B (BMT) Broadway Line Manhattan All corners of 29th Street and Broadway (4)
  • Northwestern and northeastern corner exits currently used as emergency exits
4,065,263 126 1 No
(passageway between 14th Street/Sixth Avenue and 14th Street/Eighth Avenue Manhattan

(0)

  • Closed in April 1991
0
(passageway between 47th–50th Streets–Rockefeller Center and 49th Street Manhattan (0)
  • Closed c. 1980s
0
(passageway between 34th Street–Herald Square and 34th Street–Penn Station) A (IRT)/

B (IND)

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line

Sixth Avenue Line

Manhattan To Pennsylvania Station under 33rd Street; had two exits–one at each end.
  • Located next to the basements of the Gimbels department store and the Hotel Pennsylvania.[100]
  • Closed in 1986[101] and passengers now must walk at street level to connect to the commuter railroads.[102]
  • A real estate developer, Vornado Realty Trust, proposed in 2010 to reopen the passageway in exchange for variances to build office towers replacing existing structures in the area.[103]
0
(passageway between 34th Street–Herald Square and 42nd Street–Bryant Park) B (IND) Sixth Avenue Line Manhattan All corners of Sixth Avenue and 38th Street (4)[104][105][106][107][108]
  • Intended to relieve passenger flow at the two stations.
  • Southwestern corner entrance possibly in a building.
  • 30 felonies occurred in the tunnel in 1990. It was used by 400 people daily.
    • After a rape in July 1990, transit police had tried to close it, but got stuck in bureaucracy.
    • Initially closed on March 21, 1991 after a rape; the TA declared an emergency to close the tunnel.
    • Permanently closed after a public hearing was held.[19]
  • Northern portion (from 42nd Street to 38th Street) converted to master signal tower for the Sixth Avenue Line starting in 2017.
0
33rd Street A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan West side of Park Avenue between 33rd Street and 32nd Street, outside 2 Park Avenue (2) 8,916,102 35 2 No
34th Street–

Herald Square

B (BMT/IND) Broadway Line

Sixth Avenue Line

Manhattan Southeastern corner of Sixth Avenue and 34th Street[109] (1)
Southwestern corner of 33rd Street and Sixth Avenue (1)
39,672,507 3 Yes
34th Street–Penn Station) A (IRT) Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line Manhattan

Passage to southeastern corner of 32nd Street and Seventh Avenue (1)[110][111]


Doorway at top of northeastern corner of 32nd Street and Seventh Avenue (1)
Doorway at intermediate level of southeastern corner of 33rd Street and Seventh Avenue (1)
  • Passageway to 34th Street–Herald Square located on this level.
26,034,238 6 3 Yes
49th Street B (BMT) Broadway Line Manhattan Second staircase to southeastern corner of 47th Street and Seventh Avenue (1)[112][113] 8,626,669 38 2 Partially (Uptown-only; Downtown planned)
50th Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line

Queens Boulevard Line

Manhattan

All corners of 52nd Street and Eighth Avenue (5)

  • 2 at the northeastern corner
  • Entrance at the southwestern corner is in a building and is gated off; other entrances sealed off[114]

Southeastern corner of 49th Street and Eighth Avenue (northbound only) (1)
Southwestern corner of 51st Street and Eighth Avenue (southbound only) (1)
  • To be reopened pending funding[76]
  • One closed in 1991[21]
6,694,422 65 2 Partially (Downtown-only)
59th Street–Columbus Circle A (IRT)/

B (IND)

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line

Eighth Avenue Line

Manhattan Southwestern corner of 61st Street and Central Park West; stair S6 (1)
  • Had four staircases to the two IND platforms
  • Was operated part-time, closing at nights, consisted of a high exit turnstile, and was used by 2400 daily passengers
  • Closed in the 1990s along with the reopening of S2 at 60th Street for an expansion of the Transit Police District Command; proposed at a public hearing in October 1992. It was located in a remote unmonitored portion of the station, making safety an added consideration for its closure.[115]
22,929,203 8 Yes
72nd Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan Southwestern corner of 71st Street and Central Park West, with a connection between platforms concurrent with former exit location (1)[61][76][116][117] 2,799,974 183 2 No
96th Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan Both western corners of 95th Street and Central Park West, with a connection between platforms concurrent with former exit location (2).[76][118][119] 2,887,965 180 2 No; planned
103rd Street Southwestern corner of 102nd Street and Central Park West, with a connection between platform concurrent with former exit location (2)[61][120][121]
Both western corners of 104th Street and Central Park West, with a connection between platform concurrent with former exit location (2)[61][76][122]
1,470,838 309 1 No
110th Street A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan Both southern corners of 111th Street and Lexington Avenue (2)[61]
  • Originally exit only[97]:612
  • Closed in April 1991[21]
3,734,660 135 1 No
110th Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan Northern corners of 111th Street and Frederick Douglass Boulevard (2)
Northeastern corner of 110th Street and Central Park West (northbound only) (1)
Northwestern corner of 109th Street and Central Park West (1)
  • Closed sometime after 1995[123]
2,377,135 207 1 (2 for downtown) No
116th Street Northern corners of 118th Street and Frederick Douglass Boulevard (2)[76] 2,253,473 222 1 No
125th Street Southeastern and northwestern corners of 124th Street and St. Nicholas Avenue (2)
Southeastern and northwestern corners of 126th Street and St. Nicholas Avenue (2)[76]
  • Closed before 1981[8]
  • Were proposed to be reopened to allow for the closure of the exits at the southern corners of 126th Street and St. Nicholas Avenue as part of the station's modernization.[8]
  • A public hearing on the proposed changes was held on November 19, 1981, but the changes were not made.[8]
9,335,382 32 2 Yes
145th Street B (IND) Concourse Line

Eighth Avenue Line

Manhattan Northwestern corner of St. Nicholas Avenue and 146th Street (1)[125]
  • Still exists at street level[126]
7,714,122 48 2 No
155th Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan Both southern corners of 153rd Street and St. Nicholas Avenue; stairs S1 and S2 (2)
  • Closed for safety in 1989[17][76]
  • Southwestern staircase used as an emergency exit[127]
887,427 373 1 No
163rd Street Both southern corners of 163rd Street and St. Nicholas Avenue (3)
  • 2 to southwestern corner[76]
1,437,340 310 1 No
168th Street A (IRT)

B (IND)

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line

Eighth Avenue Line

Southeastern corner of 167th Street and St. Nicholas Avenue (2)
  • Closed in April 1991[21]
  • To be reopened pending funding[76]

West side of St. Nicholas Avenue at 167th Street (1)
  • To be reopened pending funding[76]

Mitchel Square Park (2)
7,945,871 45 3 Partially

(IND only); IRT planned

175th Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Passageway to southeastern corner of 174th Street and Fort Washington Avenue (1)
  • Permanently closed after a June 1994 MTA Board vote, after having been closed for several years[128]
4,112,450 124 2 Yes
190th Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan Margaret Corbin Drive near Cabrini Boulevard (1) 1,494,996 303 2 No
Bowery B (BMT) Nassau Street Line Manhattan Western mezzanine to western corners of Kenmare Street and Bowery (2)[129] 1,327,970 321 1 No
Broad Street

Southwestern corner of Broad Street and Wall Street, outside the New York Stock Exchange; stairs S5 and S7 (2)

  • Stair S7 closed in 2002, stair S5 closed in 2012.
  • Proposed to be slabbed over in 2017 at the NYPD's recommendation as part of the NYSE's security perimeter, which was installed to protect from a possible terrorist attack after the September 11, 2001 attacks; [130][131][132]

Southeast corner of Broad Street and Exchange Place (2)
Southwest corner of Broad Street and Exchange Place (1)
2,056,754 240 No; In progress
Broadway/Lafayette Street/

Bleecker Street

B (IND)

A (IRT)

Sixth Avenue Line

Lexington Avenue Line

Manhattan Western mezzanine to
  • Western corners of Broadway and Houston Street (2)
  • Northeastern corner of Houston Street and Mercer Street (1)

(may be missing 4 more)

11,956,465 24 Yes
Brooklyn Bridge–City Hall/

Chambers Street

A (IRT)

B (BMT)

Lexington Avenue Line

Nassau Street Line

Manhattan Underneath 1 Centre Street, the Municipal Building; labeled as exit only; stairway to street removed (1)[133]
Brooklyn Bridge walkway (1)[134]
Northwest corner of Centre Street and Duane Street (1)
Eastern side of Centre Street opposite Duane Street (1)
(may be missing 3 more)
9,360,484 31 Partially

(IRT only; BMT in progress)

Canal Street A (IRT) Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line Manhattan Semi-long passageway exit to Laight Street and Varick Street (2)[135]
  • Closed in 1992

Southwestern corner of Canal Street and Varick Street (1)
1,756,236 269 1 No
Canal Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan Passage to:
  • Southeastern corner of Grand Street and Sixth Avenue (1)
  • Southwestern corner of Sullivan Street and Sixth Avenue (1)
  • Closed in April 1991 due to security concerns by NYCT and the NYPD[22]

Southeastern corner of Walker Street and West Broadway (1)
5,932,386 75 No
Canal Street A (IRT)

B (BMT)

Lexington Avenue Line

Nassau Street Line

Broadway Line

Manhattan Northeastern corner of Canal Street and Centre Street (1)
  • Used as an emergency exit

Southeastern corner of Centre Street and Canal Street (northbound Nassau Street Line only) (1)
  • Closed between 1995 and 1999[136][137]
  • Stairway to street removed

Eastern corners of Canal Street and Cortlandt Alley (2)

[138][139]

16,285,516 15 3 Partially

(IRT only)

Chambers Street–World Trade Center/Park Place/Cortlandt Street A (IRT)/

B (IND/BMT)

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line

Eighth Avenue Line

Broadway Line

Manhattan Northeastern corner of Warren Street and Church Street; stair S16 (1)
  • Consisted of a high entry turnstile and was located at the south end of a lightly used area outside of fare control; used by 1,300 weekday riders, 1% of the station's traffic
  • Exit closed due to low usage and because it was not within good sightlines of the token booth. The area was converted to office and storage space.[140]

Southeastern corner of Park Place and Church Street
  • Replaced with new stair to same corner.
16,079,624 16 Partially

(World Trade Center and Cortlandt Street only)

Delancey Street/

Essex Street

B (BMT/IND) Nassau Street Line

Sixth Avenue Line

Manhattan

Southeastern and southwestern corners of Rivington Street and Essex Street (IND only) (2)

  • Southeastern corner exit currently used as an emergency exit

Southeastern and southwestern corner of Broome Street and Essex Street (IND only) (2)
  • Southeastern corner exit currently used as an emergency exit

Both southern corners of Norfolk Street and Delancey Street (BMT only) (2)
  • Currently used as emergency exits[61]
8,128,719 44 2 No; planned
East Broadway B (IND) Sixth Avenue Line Manhattan Northeastern corner of Henry Street and Rutgers Street (1)
Southwest corner of Henry Street and Rutgers Street (1)
Northeastern corner of Madison Street and Rutgers Street; may be reopened (1)
4,458,909 110 No; planned
Fulton Street A (IRT)

B (IND/BMT)

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line Lexington Avenue Line

Eighth Avenue Line

Nassau Street Line

Manhattan

Southeastern corner of Broadway and John Street (IRT only) (1)

  • Closed due to construction of the Fulton Center

North side of Fulton Street between closed 222 Broadway entrance and Nassau Street[141] (1)
  • Closed due to the construction of the Fulton Center

Southwestern corner of Ann Street and Nassau Street (BMT only) (1)
Southeastern corner of Beekman Street and Nassau Street (BMT only) (2)
26,838,473 5 Yes
Lexington Avenue/51st Street A (IRT)
B (IND)
Lexington Avenue Line
Queens Boulevard Line
Manhattan (1) 18,940,774 9 3 Yes
Lexington Avenue/59th Street A (IRT)
B (BMT)
Lexington Avenue Line
Broadway Line
Manhattan Southwest corner of 59th Street and Lexington Avenue (1)
East side of Lexington Avenue between 58th Street and 59th Street (2)
17,888,188 11 3 No
South Ferry A (IRT)

B (BMT)

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line

Broadway Line

Manhattan Outside of Staten Island Ferry Terminal (1)
  • Closed with opening of new station in March 2009.
  • Temporarily reopened on April 4, 2013, and closed again in June 2017.
10,205,836 29 Partially

(IRT only)

Spring Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan Northwestern and southeastern corners of Prince Street and MacDougal Street (2)
Both western corners of Charlton Street and Sixth Avenue (2)[76]
Northwestern corner of Vandam Street and Sixth Avenue (1)
Southeastern corner of Spring Street and Sixth Avenue (1)
3,637,863 140 No
Times Square–42nd Street/

Port Authority Bus Terminal

A (IRT)
B (BMT/IND)
42nd Street Shuttle

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line
Flushing Line
Broadway Line
Eighth Avenue Line

Manhattan South side of 41st Street between 8th Avenue and 7th Avenue, in passageway[142][143] stair M12A&B, M13, S13 (1)[144]
  • At top of the inclined ramp
  • In January 1989, the MTA Board approved NYCT's request to close the entrance.
  • Was exit-only; used by fewer than 20 passengers per day
  • Closed because it was regularly used as a restroom or shelter for homeless people, and as a hiding place for muggers
  • The owner of the building that the exit was adjacent to, 230 West 41st Street, hired full-time security guards to protect its occupants, and requested that the exit be closed
  • The staircase at street level was entirely removed and the entrance was sealed off.

Southeastern corner of 41st Street and 8th Avenue[145] (1)
Western corners of 41st Street and 7th Avenue[146][147][148] (1)
  • Allowed for the closure of part-time booth R141, which was in operation between 3:00 p.m. and 6:30 p.m., weekdays, and that was operated with high exit turnstiles between 6:00 a.m. and 9 p.m. daily[147]
  • Closed to decrease operating costs and to improve safety [147]
  • Used by 2,000 riders daily, and by 500 riders when the booth was open[147]
  • Changes made during the renovation of Times Square [147]
  • Entrance at the northwestern corner later reopened via an easement entrance

Northeastern corner of 41st Street and Seventh Avenue (2)[147]
  • Street stairs replaced by one on the Southeastern corner of 41st Street and Seventh Avenue[147]
  • Full-time booth R145 relocated from the Northeastern corner to the Southeastern corner[147]
  • Improved circulation and orientation in the Mezzanine[147]
  • Improved street access for 75% of riders using this control area[147]
  • Changes made during the renovation of Times Square[147]

Northeastern corner of 42nd Street and 7th Avenue, by 1 Times Square, stair S10[149][150][151] (1)
  • Allowed for the closure of part-time booth R150, which had operated between 3:30 p.m. and 7:[147]30 p.m.[147]
  • Closed to reduce operating costs[147]
  • 1,000 daily riders used the entrance[147]
  • Changes made during the renovation of Times Square[147]

North side of 42nd Street, between Broadway and 6th Avenue[152] (1)
  • May have been demolished.

Southwestern corner of 43rd Street and Broadway, stair S12 (1)[147]
  • Directly served former uptown platform (Track 4 of the 42nd Street Shuttle)[147]
  • About 2,700 riders used this entrance[147]
  • Closure originally planned in 1990s/2000s reconfiguration plan of 42nd Street Shuttle
    • In responses to requests to keep the entrance open until the shuttle reconfiguration was complete, NYCT stated that the entrance was awkwardly located and that it would not be necessary with the opening of the new entrance on the south side of 42nd Street between Seventh Avenue and Broadway, and that it was looking into opening an exit on the east side of Broadway between 43rd Street and 42nd Street.[153]
    • Exit ultimately closed on October 19, 2019.
64,815,739 1 Partially (except 42nd Street Shuttle, in progress)
Wall Street A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan
South end of downtown platform, to 65 Broadway (1)[154][155]
South end of uptown platform (1)
Southwestern corner of Cedar Street and Broadway (1)
5,704,122 78 2 No
West Fourth Street–

Washington Square

B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line

Sixth Avenue Line

Manhattan Both southern corners of Washington Place and Sixth Avenue (2)
  • To lower mezzanine

Southeastern and northwestern corner of West Fourth Street and Sixth Avenue (2)[76]
  • To lower mezzanine

Southwest corner of Greenwich Avenue and Sixth Avenue (1)
13,849,130 20 2 Yes
21st Street B (IND) Crosstown Line Queens North side of 48th Avenue between Jackson Avenue and 11th Street (1)[156][157]
Southeast corner of Jackson Avenue and 48th Avenue (1)
Western corners of 47th Road and Jackson Avenue (2)
598,061 397 1 No
33rd Street–Rawson Street A (IRT) Flushing Queens East corners of 34th Street and Queens Boulevard (2); stairs S1 and S2[158]
  • Control Area R517[158]
  • Intended to improve customer security by concentrating riders at two street stairs.[158]
  • Half of the riders at the control area had to walk an additional 40 feet (12 m).[158]
  • Erroneously shown on neighborhood maps until 2015[159][160]
3,402,610 151 No
46th Street–Bliss Street A (IRT) Flushing Line Queens Eastern corners of 47th Street and Queens Boulevard (2); stairs S1 and S2[161]
  • Control Area R520[161]
  • Intended to improve customer security by concentrating riders at two street stairs.[161]
  • Half of the riders at the control area had to walk an additional 40 feet (12 m).[161]
  • Erroneously shown on neighborhood maps until 2015[162]
4,303,987 117 2 No
65th Street B (IND) Queens Boulevard Line Queens Southwest corner of 63rd Street and Broadway (1)
Southeast corner of 63rd Street and 35th Avenue (1)[61]
1,120,703 339 1 No
88th Street B (IND) Fulton Street Line Queens Both eastern corners of Liberty Avenue and 86th Street (2)[76] 880,776 375 1 No
Briarwood B (IND) Queens Boulevard Line Queens South side of Queens Boulevard, at intersection with Main Street (1)
  • Closed in August 2012[163]
  • Public hearing was held on April 4, 2011[164][165]
  • Entrance removed to accommodate the widening of the Van Wyck Expressway[165]
  • Replaced by entrance on the west side of the Van Wyck Expressway[165]

Western side of the Van Wyck Expressway south of Queens Boulevard (1)
Van Wyck Expressway (1)
1,489,396 304 No; planned
Court Square–

23rd Street

B (IND)

A (IRT)

Crosstown Line

Queens Boulevard Line

Flushing Line

Queens Southeastern corner of Court Square West and Jackson Avenue (1)
Southwestern corner of Pearson Street and Jackson Avenue (1)[166]
7,003,218 59 Partially (IRT only; Crosstown Line in design, Manhattan-bound Queens Boulevard Line platform in progress)
Flushing–

Main Street

A (IRT) Flushing Line Queens East side of Roosevelt Avenue between Main Street and Lippman Plaza[167] (2)
  • Replaced in 1990s renovation project; now an equipment room.

(may be missing one more)
18,746,832 10 Yes
Hunters Point Avenue Southeastern corner of 49th Avenue and 21st Street (1)[49]
  • Closed in 1982
1,999,970 245 No
Kew Gardens–Union Turnpike B (IND) Queens Boulevard Line Queens Entrances on both sides of Union Turnpike underneath Queens Boulevard, used for car drop-offs (2)
  • Eastern entrance led to the 80th Road mezzanine; western entrance led to the 78th Avenue mezzanine
  • Meeting on proposed closure was held in September 1985 due to the reconstruction of the Interboro Parkway; already closed for a year prior[168]

"However, the castle door exit at the Part [sic] time [western half] side is closed for unknown reasons."[169](1)

7,811,007 46 Yes
Mets–Willets Point A (IRT) Flushing Line Queens Northwestern corner of Willets Point Boulevard and Roosevelt Avenue; stairway to street removed (1)
  • Closed after station was shifted west in 1939 to become an express stop for the World's Fair
1,873,789 259 No
Northern Boulevard B (IND) Queens Boulevard Line Queens Both eastern corners of 56th Street and Broadway (2)[170]
  • In 1945, Woodside, Queens residents appealed to the Board of Transportation to open these entrances; their petition was denied because the station only had 6,000 daily riders. Residents argued that the entrances should be open because many women had to walk through "a lonely section" to get home at night.[171]
2,140,551 231 1 No
Parsons Boulevard Northeastern corner of Parsons Boulevard and Hillside Avenue (1) 1,998,650 246 No
Sutphin Boulevard Southwestern corner of 146th Street and Hillside Avenue (1) 1,338,831 318 No
Woodhaven Boulevard B (IND) Queens Boulevard Line Queens Slattery Plaza, under Long Island Expressway overpass (eastbound only) (1)[172]
  • Closed in 1993 renovation[173]

Under north side of Long Island Expressway overpass (1)
  • Closed in 1993 renovation[173]
6,871,409 63 No; planned
149th Street–

Grand Concourse

A (IRT) Jerome Avenue Line

White Plains Road Line

The Bronx Elevator entrance to southwestern corner of 149th Street and Grand Concourse (1) 4,255,015 119 No;

In design

167th Street B (IND) Concourse Line The Bronx Underpass at 167th Street and Grand Concourse (4)
  • Closed in 1993 for safety reasons
3,293,451 155 2 No
170th Street North and south sides of underpass at 170th Street, under Grand Concourse (2) 2,270,027 217 No
174th-175th Streets South side of 175th Street and Morris Avenue under Grand Concourse (1)
West side of Grand Concourse over 174th Street (1)
1,735,321 273 No
182nd-183rd Streets East and west sides of Grand Concourse near Anthony Avenue (2)
All corners of 183rd Street and Grand Concourse (4)
1,577,144 292 1 No
Fordham Road B (IND) Concourse Line The Bronx Both western corners of Fordham Road and Grand Concourse, in front of 148 East Fordham Road (southwestern) and Alexander's store (now P.C. Richard & Son) (northwestern; stairs S5 and S7) (2)[17]
  • Possibly closed in 1991,[22] due to low ridership.
  • Some riders wanted the entrances reopened as they would have been safer and more convenient for shoppers going to the Fordham stores.[174]
3,843,008 132 2 No
Kingsbridge Road Southern side of underpass at Kingsbridge Road, under Grand Concourse (1)
  • Closed in the 1990s

Both southern corners of Kingsbridge Road and Grand Concourse (2)[175][176]
West and east sides of Grand Concourse, between both directions of Kingsbridge Road (2)
2,589,970 197 2 Yes
Morris Park A (IRT) Dyre Avenue Line The Bronx

Northern side of Colden Avenue (1)


Paulding Avenue (southbound only) (1)
685,577 389 1 No
Third Avenue–138th Street A (IRT) Pelham Line The Bronx Northeastern corner of Lincoln Avenue and 138th Street (1) 2,515,479 200 No
Third Avenue–149th Street A (IRT) White Plains Road Line The Bronx Passageway to IRT Third Avenue Line station, from a closed crossunder (1)[177]
Northwestern corner of 149th Street and Melrose Avenue west of the current staircase (1)
7,458,222 52 1 Yes

Closed easement entrances[edit]

Station Division Line Borough Location Ridership (2017)[62] Ridership rank out of 425 (2017)[62] Number of exit points ADA Accessible?
Borough Hall/Court Street A (IRT)

B (BMT)

Eastern Parkway Line

Fourth Avenue Line

Brooklyn Brooklyn Municipal Building (1)
  • Closed on February 13, 1996[178]
10,693,598 28 Partially (Excluding BMT and Downtown Eastern Parkway Line); Downtown Eastern Parkway planned
Hoyt Street A (IRT) Eastern Parkway Line Brooklyn Macy's (former Abraham and Strauss Store) (1 passage) 2,137,478 232 No
Hoyt–Schermerhorn Streets B (IND) Crosstown Line

Fulton Street Line

Brooklyn Passageway from the Bond Street exit to southeastern corner of Bond Street and Livingston Street, to now-defunct Loeser's Department Store (2) 3,264,293 157 No; planned
Sheepshead Bay B (BMT) Brighton Line Brooklyn Passage behind the full-time booth to a restaurant and a small arcade of stores (1 passage)
  • Closed in 1998 renovation
4,297,325 118 2 No; planned
34th Street–

Herald Square

B (BMT/IND) Broadway Line

Sixth Avenue Line

Manhattan Entrance to Macy's lower level (northwestern corner of 34th Street and Broadway) (1)
Entrance to Korvette's store at 33rd Street and Sixth Avenue (1)[179]
39,672,507 3 Yes
42nd Street–Bryant Park/Fifth Avenue A (IRT)
B (IND)
Flushing Line

Sixth Avenue Line

Manhattan Passageway to WR Grace Chemical building (formerly Stern's Department Store)[180], on the north side of 42nd Street between Fifth Avenue and Sixth Avenue (1)
  • Shown on 2015 neighborhood map, but closed years earlier[181][182]
16,594,289 14 4 No; planned
Astor Place A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan Clinton Hall (former Mercantile Library) (southbound only) (1) 5,245,449 89 1 No
Chambers Street–World Trade Center/Park Place/Cortlandt Street A (IRT)/

B (INDBMT)

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line

Eighth Avenue Line

Broadway Line

Manhattan Passageway to the Woolworth Building, at northwestern corner of Broadway and Park Place
  • Closed after September 11, 2001 (1)

Passage to 99 Church Street (1 passage)[184][185]
16,079,624 16 Partially

(World Trade Center and Cortlandt Street only)

City Hall B (BMT) Broadway Line Manhattan Passageway to the Woolworth Building (1) 2,258,254 220 1 No
Fulton Street A (IRT)

B (IND/BMT)

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line Lexington Avenue Line

Eighth Avenue Line

Nassau Street Line

Manhattan Northwestern corner of Broadway and Dey Street inside 195 Broadway (IRT only) (1)[188]
  • Closed due to construction of the Fulton Center

Northeastern corner of Broadway and Fulton Street inside 222 Broadway (1)
  • Closed due to the construction of the Fulton Center
26,838,473 5 Yes
Grand Central–42nd Street A (IRT) 42nd Street Shuttle

Flushing Line

Lexington Avenue Line


Manhattan Passageway to the Socony–Mobil Building (1)
  • Partially reopened, with new street entrances to southeastern corner of 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue, in December 2017; remainder of passage remains closed.

Closed passage at Graybar Building on the west side of Lexington Avenue and 43rd Street (1)[189]
  • 120 feet (37 m)-long passageway branched off of Chrysler Passageway[190]
  • Recommended closed by the New York City Department of City Planning in 1991[191]
  • Closed by the NYCTA on March 29, 1991 along with 14 of the other most dangerous passageways after a women was raped the previous week in a passageway connecting 34th Street and 42nd Street. Originally, it was closed by emergency order, with a public hearing was held afterwards.[22][192][21]
  • 365 felonies were committed in the passageway since January 1, 1990, making it the most dangerous of the 15 closed.[192]
  • The passageway was behind a token booth, making it hard to patrol[192]


44,928,488 2 Partially

(Except 42nd Street Shuttle, in progress)

Inwood–

207th Street

B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan Northwestern corner of 207th Street and Broadway located inside a building (1)[193]
  • Closed after being severely damaged after a fire. Permanent closure approved by MTA Board in June 1994, after having been closed for several years[194]
  • Possibly replaced by elevator on northwestern corner.
2,954,523 174 Yes
Rector Street B (BMT) Broadway Line Manhattan Basement of American Express Building; pre-1967 (uptown only) (1) 2,213,971 226 No; Downtown in progress
South Ferry A (IRT)

B (BMT)

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line

Broadway Line

Manhattan Inside of Staten Island Ferry Terminal (1)
  • Closed with opening of new station in March 2009 and removed.
10,205,836 29 Partially

(IRT only)

Times Square–42nd Street/

Port Authority Bus Terminal

A (IRT)
B (BMT/IND)
42nd Street Shuttle

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line
Flushing Line
Broadway Line
Eighth Avenue Line

Manhattan Knickerbocker Hotel, southeastern corner of Broadway and 42nd Street[195][196] (1 or 2) 64,815,739 1 Partially (except 42nd Street Shuttle, in progress)
Flushing–

Main Street

A (IRT) Flushing Line Queens Basement of Duane Reade (former Woolworth's) at northeast corner of Main Street and Roosevelt Avenue (1 passage)
(may be missing one more)
18,746,832 10 Yes


Removed entrances[edit]

Station Division Line Borough Location Ridership (2017)[62] Ridership rank out of 425 (2017)[62] Number of exit points ADA Accessible?
25th Avenue B (BMT) West End Line Brooklyn Bay 41st Street and 86th Street[97]:625
  • Steel structure visible in 1957, removed at an earlier date
1,789,365 265 No
Bay 50th Street Bay 49th Street (closer) or Avenue X and Stillwell Avenue[97]:625
  • Steel structure visible in 1957, removed at an earlier date
900,508 371 No
Avenue P B (IND) Culver Line Brooklyn Southeastern corner of Avenue P and McDonald Avenue 534,727[b] 405 1 No
Avenue X South end of the platforms to Avenue Y and Shell Road
  • Steel structure visible in 1957, removed at an earlier date
738,274 386 No
Franklin Avenue/

Botanic Garden

B (BMT) Franklin Avenue Line Brooklyn President Street west of Franklin Avenue
  • From shuttle platforms
4,762,184 103 No
Broadway Junction B (BMT/IND) Jamaica Line

Canarsie Line

Fulton Street Line

Brooklyn Both northern corners of Conway Street and Broadway[197] 2,911,532 179 No; planned
Central Avenue B (BMT) Myrtle Avenue Line Brooklyn South mezzanine and exit 539,681[b] 404 1 No
Cypress Hills B (BMT) Jamaica Line Brooklyn North side of Jamaica Avenue east of Autumn Avenue (Manhattan-bound only)[198][199] 435,855 410 No
Fort Hamilton Parkway B (IND) Culver Line Brooklyn Entrances to Fort Hamilton Parkway
  • Removed for Prospect Expressway and replaced by a ramp
1,786,458 267 No
Franklin Avenue–Fulton Street B (BMT/IND) Franklin Avenue Line

Fulton Street Line

Brooklyn Big wooden staircase on Franklin Avenue just south of Fulton Street 2,058,258 239 Yes
Knickerbocker Avenue B (BMT) Myrtle Avenue Line Brooklyn South mezzanine and exit 593,366[b] 399 1 No
West Eighth Street–New York Aquarium B (BMT/IND) Brighton Line

Culver Line

Brooklyn Passageway over Surf Avenue to New York Aquarium parking lot
  • Removed on August 8, 2013 for structural reasons.
  • This entrance had been completed in 1955.[200][201]
789,104 383 No
96th Street A (IRT) Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line Manhattan Both southern corners of 96th Street and Broadway
  • From old side platforms
  • Replaced by station house on April 5, 2010[202]
11,948,981 25 Yes
155th Street–Eighth Avenue B (IND) Concourse Line Manhattan Polo Grounds 1,212,240 330 1 No
Canal Street B (BMT)

A (IRT)

Broadway Line

Nassau Street Line

Lexington Avenue Line

Manhattan Northwestern corner of Canal Street and Centre Street[203]
  • Demolished between 1979 and 1980
16,285,516 15 Partially (IRT only)
Chambers Street–World Trade Center/Park Place/Cortlandt Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line

Broadway Line

Manhattan Hudson Terminal
  • Removed in 1973 with its replacement by the World Trade Center

World Trade Center's lower concourse to the BMT platforms

  • Destroyed in September 11, 2001 Attacks
14,825,863 17 Partially (World Trade Center and Cortlandt Street only)
WTC Cortlandt A (IRT) Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line Manhattan World Trade Center concourse
  • Destroyed in September 11, 2001 Attacks

Vesey Street and West Broadway (former southeastern corner)
Liberty Street through 4 World Trade Center
  • Destroyed in September 11, 2001 Attacks
0[c] 425 Yes
75th Street–Elderts Lane B (BMT) Jamaica Line Queens Western corners of Elderts Lane and Jamaica Avenue[204] 1,069,608 346 No
85th Street–Forest Parkway Western corners of Forest Parkway and Jamaica Avenue[205] 1,156,600 336 No
104th Street Western corners of 102nd Street and Jamaica Avenue[206]
  • Closed c. 1989
502,541[b] 406 No
111th Street A (IRT) Flushing Line Queens 112th Street and Roosevelt Avenue; stairway to street removed (2)[207] 3,721,445 137 1 No
111th Street B (IND) Jamaica Line Queens Eastern corners of 113th Street and Jamaica Avenue; stairway to street removed (2)[208] 948,885 368 1 No
Beach 90th Street B (IND) Rockaway Line Queens Between Beach 87th Street and Beach 88th Street on the north side of Rockaway Freeway; southbound only.[61][209] 411,887 411 No
Beach 98th Street Northwestern corner of Beach 97th Street and Rockaway Freeway; southbound only.[61][210]
Beach 101st Street and Rockaway Freeway
180,588 422 No
Beach 105th Street North side of Rockaway Freeway at Beach 105th Street; southbound only.[61] 97,654 423 No
Forest Avenue B (BMT) Myrtle Avenue Line Queens Northwest corner of Woodward Avenue and Madison Street (2)
  • Closed in the 1960s
  • Local residents called for the removal of the staircases in 1981[211]
796,742[b] 381 1 No
Vernon Boulevard–Jackson Avenue A (IRT) Flushing Line Queens South side of 50th Avenue between Jackson Avenue and Vernon Boulevard (1) 4,821,191 100 2 No; planned
Bronx Park East A (IRT) White Plains Road Line The Bronx Southwestern corner of Sagamore Street and Birchall Avenue (1)[212][213] 799,927 379 No

Unfinished or unopened entrances[edit]

Entrances that were initially slated for closure[edit]

Station Division Line Borough Location Ridership (2017)[62] Ridership rank out of 425 (2017)[62]
Borough Hall/

Court Street

A (IRT)

B (BMT)

Eastern Parkway Line

Lexington Avenue Line
Fourth Avenue Line

Brooklyn Southwestern corner of Montague Street and Clinton Street[14]
The proposal to close this entrance, along with two at two other stations, was initially released in 1982, with a public hearing.[218] The entrance and those at two other stations were revisited in 1983. The decision to close the station was postponed to the following MTA board meeting so it could be studied further. Initially, the NYCTA cited the design preference of the architect rehabilitating the station as the rationale for the closure, but later stated that safety concerns were the real issue. The move to close the entrance was opposed by City Council President Carol Bellamy and local residents.[219] This entrance was to be closed for being too far away from the token booth.[220]
10,693,598 28
Lafayette Avenue B (IND) Fulton Street Line Brooklyn Southwestern corner of Lafayette Avenue and South Portland Avenue (S8-M10);[15] 1,621,121 286
Metropolitan Avenue/Lorimer Street B (IND/BMT) Crosstown Line

Canarsie Line

Brooklyn Northeastern corner of Union Avenue and Metropolitan Avenue, stair S5[46]
  • Exit-only staircase[46]
  • Planned to be closed during the 2000 station renovation project[46]
  • Was intended to improve security by concentrating riders at the full-time booth at the southwestern corner of the intersection[46]
  • 35 daily riders would have been required to walk an additional 480 feet (150 m)[46]

Southeastern corner of Union Avenue and Metropolitan Avenue, stair S7[46]

  • Planned to be closed during the 2000 station renovation project along with the other staircase at this corner, which was perpendicular to this staircase[46]
  • Intended to help reconfigure the mezzanine to improve the transfer at the station for 13,000 riders[46]
  • To improve the transfer, a connection would have needed to be created in the mezzanine by putting into place a corridor within fare control across the free zone that was served by the pairs of street staircases on both side of Union Avenue, requiring the closure of one pair. It was decided to close the eastern staircases because they were much less used than the western staircases and because having the booth located adjacent to the western pair would allow transfer movement to be done more smoothly.[83]
  • 1,400 daily riders would have been required to walk an additional 90 feet (27 m) to the exits on the west side[46]
5,010,601 97
103rd Street A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan Southeastern corner of 103rd Street and Lexington Avenue[14]
The proposal to close this entrance, along with two at two other stations, was initially released in 1982, with a public hearing.[218] The entrance and those at two other stations were revisited in 1983. The decision to close the station was postponed to the following MTA board meeting so that an entrance at one of the two other stations–Court Street–could be studied further. The rationale for the closure was safety.[219][220]
4,402,069 112
125th Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan Southern corners of 127th Street and St. Nicholas Avenue[8]
  • Proposed to be closed as part of the station's modernization
  • Closed entrances at the northwestern and southeastern corners of 126th Street and St. Nicholas Avenue would have been reopened to replace these entrances.
  • A public hearing on the proposed changes was held on November 19, 1981.
9,335,382 32
Jackson Heights–Roosevelt Avenue/74th Street A (IRT)/

B (IND)

Flushing Line

Queens Boulevard Line

Queens Eastern corners of Broadway and 75th Street (2)[221]
  • Street stairs S1 and S2; planned to be closed and replaced by new stairs on the west side of 75th Street[221]
  • Would allow for the closure of the east end of the mezzanine[221]. Intended to improve security by moving the stairs closer to the full-time booth[221]
17,095,073 17
Fordham Road B (IND) Concourse Line The Bronx Northeastern corner of 188th Street and Grand Concourse[13] 3,843,008 132

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Italicized if different from WNYC map
  2. ^ a b c d e f Ridership lower than usual due to station renovation closure
  3. ^ Station was destroyed in the September 11 attacks and reopened on September 8, 2018

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See also[edit]

Entrances[edit]

Closed areas[edit]

HEETs[edit]

Token Booths[edit]

Provisions[edit]

External links[edit]