User:Kew Gardens 613/List of closed New York City Subway entrances

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Closed staircase at Marcy Avenue and Willoughby Street.

This is a list of New York City Subway entrances that have been closed, demolished, or were planned to be closed, and those that have been reopened. This list does not include entrances to stations that have been closed or for stations that have been demolished. Many entrances were closed between the 1970s and 1990s due to concerns over crime, low ridership, and to cut costs by reducing station staffing. The two main waves of closings occurred in 1976 and 1991, as the country was in the midst of recessions. As crime has decreased, and as ridership has gone up, these entrances, for the most part have not been revisited. During some station renovation projects, closed entrances have been reopened.

Much of this information comes from websites such as stationreporter.net (now defunct), subwaynut.com, nycsubway.org, old photos, old tax photos, aerial photos, Google Maps streetview, public hearing notices, NYCTA board materials, newspaper clippings, Google Books, personal observations, whether they are images or memories of using the entrances in question, and through research done as part of Alan Minor's master's thesis.[1] This list is on Wikipedia–a subpage of my userpage–so that this list can be crowdsourced and can be easily added to, and with citations. One of the goals of this list is to migrate the information from here to the relevant articles once they are sufficiently referenced. Another main purpose is to eventually create an article in the mainspace, which would require a lot of research. Proper citations would be appreciated, whether they are newspaper articles detailing their closure, New York City Transit Authority (NYCTA) documentation, or images showing their existence. Additional information would be appreciated, including additional locations where closed entrances are located, the locations of demolished/removed entrances, more specific locational information including street corners and on mezzanine, the existence of entrances to private buildings and underground passageways connecting stations, and dates when the entrances in question closed, and if possible, why they closed.

In response to a request made by State Senator Martin Dilan, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) stated that 119 stations either had a closed street stair or closed control area, and that 130 stations had closed entrances. Within these 130 stations, there are 114 closed control areas and 298 closed street stairs. 188 of these were connected to closed control areas, with the remainder connected to control areas that remain open.[2]

History[edit]

Closings: pre-1970[edit]

Stations built by the IRT have seen various entrances closed part-time as early as 1921 due to lower ridership initially.[3] The earliest reported closure occurred before 1929, when an entrance to the northwestern corner of Fulton Street and William Street on the Seventh Avenue Line was closed and demolished.[4]

Stations built by the Independent Subway System are widely considered to be overbuilt with large mezzanines, multiple entrances, and entrances at every corner of an intersection to bracket a future surge in ridership. Due to lower ridership initially, several entrances were closed soon after they opened or were never opened. For instance, vandalism occurring as early as the IND Eighth Avenue Line's opening day prompted the closure of various entrances - at least part time - just two months after opening, including those at 97th (since reopened) & 95th Streets at 96th Street and 104th Street at 103rd Street.[5] It is reported that turnstiles from these entrances were relocated to the Concourse Line by that line's opening in July 1933. Other lightly-used entrances at Carroll Street were closed as early as 1939, just around six years after the station opened. Other closures occurred around the late 1940s and 1950s, including some entrances from 118th Street and Frederick Douglass Boulevard to 116th Street. In May 1965, NYCTA Chairman Joseph O'Grady said that he was considering closing some subway entrances as part of an anti-crime drive.[6]

Despite the closures, some previously unopened entrances were opened later on, either due to increased ridership or community pressure, such as entrances from Bedford Avenue and Fulton Street to Nostrand Avenue on the IND Fulton Street Line.

Closings: 1970s–1990s[edit]

Background[edit]

Between the 1970s and 1990s, the New York City Transit Authority (NYCTA), closed dozens of subway entrances throughout the system due to steep declines in the system's ridership, cut operation costs, and improve security. Many of the entrances closed were located out of view of token booth clerks or were accessed by winding, narrow passageways that made them prone to crime. Entrances that were closed were decided based on their impact on additional walking times, and on ridership. Many of the closed entrances were already open only during specific times each day.

Entrance closures were often made in conjunction with station rehabilitation projects, such as the renovation of stations under the Station Modernization Program and Station Renovation Program during the late 1980s and early 1990s. In other cases, entrances were closed at the request of local communities or were closed in response to crimes that occurred in these areas. In some cases, entrances that were initially slated for closure were kept open with other entrances closed instead.

Many closed entrances were equipped with electromagnetic sensors so that they can be unlocked by station agents in case of emergencies. Despite this, there are no plans to reopen entrances closed during this time period.

1970s[edit]

From April 1971 to February 1972, eight percent of the system's 830 token booths, or 67 of them, were closed, mostly part-time, to save $1 million annually. A spokesman for the NYCTA said that crime was not a factor in the decision, which was was "purely economic". Most booths were closed for one or two shifts but remained open during peak hours, usually in the morning. Among the cuts made was the closing of the token booth at 88th Street. It was originally open until 9:15 p.m., but began closing at 2:15 p.m.. This change, which affected 650 riders, was fought by three local block organizations.[7]

In the last years of Mayor John Lindsay's administration more than 200 entrances, most of which were infrequently used, were closed for portions of the day or were closed entirely to reduce costs by closing token booths.[8] Dozens of subway entrances were closed in 1976 and 1977 as part of service cuts.

On June 24, 1975, the NYCTA closed the Lorimer Street entrances and token booth at the Lorimer Street station from 10 p.m. to 6:30 a.m.. This change was opposed by a group of local residents.[9]

In November 1975, attendants at the part-time token booths at 85th Street–Forest Parkway, 104th Street, and 111th Street were removed. Assemblymember Frederick D. Schmidt said that this change left the stations "wide open to vandalism."[10] In January 1979, Assemblymember Schmidt and the Woodhaven Block Association circulated a petition requesting the reopening of the token booth at Forest Parkway, and the assignment of a TA policeman to curb loitering and vandalism there.[11]

On December 15, 1976, the NYCTA announced a proposed package of service cuts to cut the agency's budget by $30 million to balance its budget, as was mandated by the Emergency Financial Control Board.[12] A public hearing on the plan was held on January 5, 1977, and the cuts were approved by the NYCTA board on January 14.

On January 24, 1977, due to the fiscal crisis, the MTA enacted a $30 million package of service cuts, closing 23 part-time token booths, and making 57 full-time booths part time at 52 stations.[13] These booths would be closed from about 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. and street entrances leading to these control areas would be closed overnight. At 20 of the locations here part-time booths were to be closed or have their hours reduced, passengers could still enter using high entry turnstiles, while at 22 stations, these entrances would become exit only. These changes were to be enacted over the course of twelve weeks. At this time, the NYCTA began closing 23 part-time booths and reducing the hours of twelve booths over five weeks. Following the token booth cuts, there would be 519 full-time booths and 231 part-time booths on the subway system.[14] Iron gates were installed to close of the entrances that would be closed overnight.[15]

These cuts were estimated to save $2 million over the following eighteen months, with savings to be achieved by reducing staffing by one eight-hour tour and by closing part-time booths at the least used entrances. Savings were also to be achieved by not hiring to replace personnel lost due to attrition. Due to strong community opposition, most of the cuts had not yet taken effect in April 1977.

In February 1977, 350 residents of Ozone Park petitioned the MTA to reopen the token booth at 95th Street at Rockaway Boulevard, citing overcrowding at the station's remaining open booth.[16]

On February 14, 1977, more of the token booth cuts approved took effect, including the closing of the part-time booth at 54th Street and Roosevelt Avenue at 52nd Street, at 70th Road and Queens Boulevard at Forest Hills–71st Avenue, at 169th Street and Hillside Avenue at 169th Street. The hours at the booth at Northern Boulevard and 41st Street at Queens Plaza were reduced from being open from 6 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. to being open from 2 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.. Entrances could still be made from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. through a high-wheel turnstile. Booths at 179th Street and Hillside Avenue, at Parsons Boulevard and Hillside Avenue, 153rd Street and Hillside Avenue, and Queens Boulevard and 116th Street(?) would close soon afterwards.[17]

On February 15, 1977, the NYCTA postponed plans to close the President Street token booth at the Carroll Street station between 10 p.m. and 6 a.m. pending further studies after Brooklyn Borough President Howard Golden and the majority leader of the City Council, Thomas Cuite met with the executive director of the NYCTA. This booth was only used by 100 riders between these hours. Closing the booth overnight was intended to eliminate one of three daily shifts at the booth.[18]

The entrances at 78th Avenue and Queens Boulevard at Kew Gardens–Union Turnpike were slated to close on March 1 between 9 p.m. and 6 a.m.. On March 4, 1977, a rally was held by the Forest Hills South Tenants' Associations, local officials, the local Democratic club, and local officials to protest the planned closing of the entrances overnight. 2,000 people signed a petition calling for the MTA to halt plans to close the entrances until another public hearing could be held. Following the rally, the head of the MTA, Harold Fischer agreed to postpone the closure for two weeks, when another public hearing would be held.[19]

On March 16, 1977, the New York State Assembly passed legislation preventing the NYCTA from closing any more entrances, or limiting the hours, without public notice and public hearings.[20] The signing of this piece of legislation, and community objections due to longer walking distances, made it hard to close additional entrances.[8]

On April 18, 1977, a special committee of the NYCTA Board issued a report advising the MTA to halt plans to reduce the hours of 21 token booths. It recommended undoing the cuts at two stations in the Bronx (Pelham Parkway and Kingsbridge Road), at two stations in Queens (Kew Gardens–Union Turnpike and Rockaway Boulevard), at six stations in Brooklyn (Coney Island–Stillwell Avenue, Court Street, High Street, Utica Avenue, Borough Hall, and Crown Heights–Utica Avenue), and at ten stations in Manhattan (181st Street, 86th Street, 96th Street, 125th Street, 145th Street, West Fourth Street–Washington Square, 23rd Street, East Broadway, two at 59th Street, 14th Street, and 96th Street). A member of the special committee said that the savings from reducing the hours at token booths often was not significant enough to outweigh inconveniences to riders. Certain booths had hours restored as closing these booths forced people to come "up above aground in a dangerous area."[21] More than 100 people attended the meeting protesting the closure of entrances at eight stations in Queens. The closure at the western end of the Kew Gardens—Union Turnpike station forced riders using those exits to walk through a "maze of highways"-Queens Boulevard, Union Turnpike, and the Interboro Parkway, all without pedestrian walkways to get home. In several cases, the closure of entrances forced riders to walk several blocks to board buses, whose stops are right outside of the closed entrances. Due to error, the MTA kept some of the stations open to overnight use, such as Kew Gardens-Union Turnpike, whose western exits were to be closed. An MTA committee which reviewed the closings recommended only closing the exits from 12:30 to 6 a.m.. It also recommended that the four permanently closed exits at the eastern end of Rockaway Boulevard be reopened from 6 to 9 a.m. during morning rush hours. It made recommendations on all of the 22 cases it reviewed.[22]

On April 25, 1977, the NYCTA Board, at a special meeting, voted to restored $100,000 of $30 million in service cuts, including expanding the hours of 23 previously closed entrances and booths.[23] The NYCTA Board also reaffirmed reduction in hours at 69 other token booths.[24][25] About $25,000 a year per shift per token booth would be closed from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m..

On January 1, 1979, the first of seventeen part-time token booths that had their hours reduced or were closed in 1977 were reopened, as the agency's finances were in better shape.[26] The remaining sixteen reopened on January 8, with the hiring of four part-time provisional employees. The booths reopened were at Canal Street-Broadway, Canal Street-Centre Street, DeKalb Avenue-Flabush Avenue, Flushing Avenue-Broadway, Fordham Road near Alexanders', West Fourth Street, Steinway Street, 50th Street and 14th Street on Sixth Avenue, and Bliss Street.[27][28]

On March 16, 1979, Mayor Ed Koch announced his $10 million plan to fight subway crime.[29] As part of the plan to reduce subway crime, certain subway entrances were closed in April 1979.[30]

1980s[edit]

In September 1980, transit police chief James Meehan, ordered his commanders of the anti-crime unit to review all subway entrances and recommend the closing of some. In the previous two years, only a few entrances were closed because the NYCTA was hesitant to recommend more because of the bureaucratic hurdles requires to do so. Transit police said that at every subway station with three or more entrances, at least one entrances is more crime-prone and should be closed during a portion of the day. More than a year prior, the transit police had identified 10 or 11 entrances to be closed. The first new entrance to be closed was the entrance to the northeast corner of Eighth Avenue and 42nd Street. As part of upcoming station renovation projects, the MTA planned to eliminate blind stairways and nooks to create clear sightlines between both ends of subway platforms and from token booths to entrances.[8] On March 11, 1981, the chairman of the MTA's finance committee, Stephen Berger, said that at least 50 of the 746 token booths in the system should be closed to pay for additional police. He recommended that booths on the outbound platforms of stations in outlying areas of the Bronx and Brooklyn be closed as most people bought tokens on the Manhattan-bound platforms on their way to work.[31]

Modernization Program[edit]

As part of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA)'s 1982–1991 Capital Program, funding was provided for security, which was used to create off-hour waiting areas, install security mirrors in stations, eliminate cul-de-sacs in stations, and close unused station entrances and exits.[32] During the 1980s and 1990s, the MTA held legally-required public hearings to discuss its proposed modifications to station control areas, including the removal of token booths, modifications to the fare control line, the closure of entrances at night, and the closure of entrances entirely. The criteria used to determine which entrances to close included existing counts, tokens sold, entrance capacity, distance to the nearest full time booth, fare registrations, senior citizen patronage, station location and the ongoing development of the surrounding area.[33][34] (1979 CTD)

On July 9, 1981, a public hearing was held on proposed closure and reduction of hours at token booths at seven stations in Manhattan and Brooklyn. The underutilized entrance to the southeastern corner of 41st Street and 8th Avenue would be closed as part of the modernization of the 42nd Street–Port Authority Bus Terminal station. The token booth at Wall Street station at Pine Street, with staircases to Chase Manhattan and the Bank Building, would be closed from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m. (and to 7:30 a.m. on Saturdays). This booth was already closed from 7:30 a.m. Saturday to 7 a.m. Monday. In addition, the booth at Norfolk Street at Essex Street would be permanently closed with its closure from 6 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.. It had been closed from 9:30 p.m. to 6 a.m. seven days a week. This closure closed the entrance to the station at Norfolk Street. Six full-time booths were made part-time. Booths at Sixth Avenue, 34th Street–Penn Station on the IRT, Fulton Street on the BMT, 34th Street—Penn Station on the IND, and Lexington Avenue—59th Street on the BMT would be closed from 11 p.m. to 7 a.m., while a booth at Atlantic Avenue on the Brighton Line would be closed fro 10 p.m. to 6 a.m..[35]

On July 18, 1981, the MTA Board voted to reduce or eliminate shifts at token booths at 61 stations as part of a plan to save $12 million annually.[36]

On September 17, 1981, a public hearing was held to discuss the reduction of weekend hours in at 64 token booths (in 60 stations) in where ridership from midnight to 8 a.m. was fewer than 500.[37] Six of the stations were in Queens (Rockaway Avenue, Ely Avenue, Kew Gardens—Union Turnpike, Parsons Boulevard, 179th Street), eighteen were in Brooklyn (Atlantic Avenue, Prospect Park, Kings Highway, Sheepshead Bay, Brighton Beach, Ocean Parkway, Lorimer Street, Myrtle Avenue, Eastern Parkway, Nostrand Avenue, Utica Avenue, Bedford—Nostrand Avenues, Carroll Street, 15th Street—Prospect Park, Nevins Street, Crown Heights–Utica Avenue, Borough Hall and Bergen Street), eight were in the Bronx (Tremont Avenue, Fordham Road, 205th Street, 161st Street (IRT), Third Avenue—149th Street, 167th Street, 170th Street, and 174th–175th Streets), and at 26 stations in Manhattan (Lexington Avenue, 57th Street, 49th Street, 42nd Street, 34th Street, Essex Street, 175th Street, 163rd Street, 125th Street, 110th Street, 96th Street, 34th Street, Chambers Street, Seventh Avenue, Fifth Avenue, 42nd Street, 14th Street, Second Avenue, Delancey Street, Penn Station, Times Square, 66th Street, Bowling Green, Wall Street, Fulton Street, and Chambers Street).[38]

The booth in question at Third Avenue/149th Street would be closed from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sundays, the one at 161st Street/River Avenue would be closed from 2 p.m. to 10 p.m., the one at 176th Street and at 205th Street/Perry Avenue would be closed from 2 p.m. to 10 p.m. on Saturdays and from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sundays. The 179th Street end of the Tremont Avenue station would be closed from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sundays, the Fordham Road booth would be closed from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sundays, and the McClellan Street booth at 167th Street and the 170th Street booth at 170th Street would be closed from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. At the public hearing, Bronx Borough President Stanley Simon spoke in opposition to the closure of token booths in the Bronx, saying that the TA was "playing Russian roulette with riders when it closes down subway booths."[39]

On November 19, 1981, a public hearing was held to discuss changes to the 125th Street station as part of its modernization. The exits at the southern corners of 127th Street and St. Nicholas Avenue would have been closed, and closed entrances at the northwestern and southeastern corners of 126th Street and St. Nicholas Avenue would have been reopened to replace these entrances. These changes were never completed.[40] (TOKEN)

On August 31, 1982, a public hearing was held to discuss changes to the 34th Street–Herald Square station to be made as part of the station's renovation. The entrance at the northeast corner of 32nd Street and Broadway would be closed and replaced by a new entrance on the east side of Broadway north of 32nd Street.[41] The change was never made.

On September 28, 1982, a public hearing was held to discuss a change in the hours of operation of an entrance at the Cortlandt Street station. Between 7:30 p.m. and 6:00 a.m., Mondays through Thursdays, and from 7:30 p.m. on Friday to 6:00 a.m. on Monday, the southern entrance to the World Trade Center Concourse from the southbound platform and from the northbound platform via an underpass would be closed.[42]

On October 21, 1982, a public hearing was held to discuss access changes at the 74th Street—Broadway and Hunters Point Avenue stations to be made as part of the Station Modernization Program. At 74th Street, staircases on the east side of Broadway at Roosevelt Avenue were to be replaced by an escalator, and new stairs were to be built around the corner on the south side of Roosevelt Avenue. At Hunters Point Avenue, the entrance at 49th Avenue east of 21st Street was to be closed.[43]

On December 28, 1982, a public hearing was held to discuss changes to the Hoyt Street station to be made as part of the Station Modernization Program. As a security measure, the NYCTA planned to close the passageway between the entrance to the Abraham and Strauss Store, 501 Fulton Street, which was located at the western end of the southbound platform and the northbound platform, the stairway between the passageway and the northbound platform, and the exit to 501 Fulton Street.[44][45][46]

In January 1983, the NYCTA Police Department recommended closing two entrances at the Grand Central—42nd Street station to the shuttle, one to the west of Madison Avenue, one immediately to the east, when their token booths were closed. The booth, at the time, was open in the late afternoon and early evening. The change would be made to reduce crime and improve passenger safety. The change required riders to walk an additional 350 feet to an entrance.[47]

On February 28, 1985, a public hearing was held to discuss the planned closure of the entrance at the southwest corner of Lafayette Avenue and South Portland Avenue at the Fulton Street station.[48] (FEB 1987)

In October 1985, the NYCTA started a $22 million program to improve safety at stations with high crime rates to add vandal-proof lighting, to install mirrors to eliminate blind corners, and blocking off dead-end passageways. A majority of the funding for the program came from the Federal government. The stations that would be addressed first included Union Square, 34th Street—Penn Station on the A C E, Rockaway Avenue, Queens Plaza, and 50th Street on the IND. The first part of the program would be the installation of 1,000 curved mirrors at the intersection of long corridors. After that, 38 dead-end passageways and 41 isolated alcoves would be sealed off. A police officer in each of the NYCTA's eleven patrol districts was assigned to pick the most dangerous areas in each station, with a focus on creating straight sight lines out of winding passageways. In areas that it was deemed might be needed later, gates were installed to block them off, while areas no longer in use were to be bricked over. In 1986, vandal-proof lighting would be installed on staircases to elevated platforms and in dimly lit subway mezzanines. Another part of the program, which would transfer 220 closed circuit television monitors from rooms in the Columbus Circle and Times Square stations to token booths at the stations with the most crime, was under review as their installation at two major stations did not help reduce crime during a four-year pilot program. The NYCTA also scrapped plans to close some of the system's 200 Iron Maiden turnstiles used at entrances without token booths due to opposition over the closure of entrances. TA Police Chief James Meehan said "people get very upset whenever we even entertain the idea of closing down a subway entrance. They say they would rather take their chances walking a block below ground than above ground."[49]

In December 1986, the token booth on the southbound platform at Astor Place had its hours expanded from 2 to 10 p.m. weekdays to 24 hours a day on a six-month pilot basis. The pilot was started at the urging of the Committee for Astor Place. The NYCTA had previously closed the passageway between the northbound and southbound platforms to reduce crime, but that had forced riders entering the downtown side without a token to use the passageway to get to the northbound platform when the southbound token booth was closed.[50]

On November 18, 1987, a public hearing was held to discuss changes in station access at multiple stations, including closing 44 booths. The NYCTA estimated that closing 19 turnstile entrances, and replacing 25 others with HEETs would save $250,000, which could be used to hire more station cleaners for the agency's anti-graffiti program. TA Stations Director Carol Meltzer said these locations were chosen out of a list of 100, and were the booths with the lowest usage among those that had another booth at the same station.[51] The stations impacted included Lawrence Street, New Utrecht-62nd Street, 79th Street, Bedford Avenue, Jefferson Street, DeKalb Avenue, Halsey Street, Clinton–Washington Avenues, Nassau Avenue, Myrtle-Willoughby Avenues, and Flatbush Avenue. The booths subject to closure were all underutilized and were mostly part-time. The booth closing at 62nd Street was the 61st Street entrance, and was only used by 200 passengers when it was open during the morning rush hour; it was closed the rest of the day.[52]

On January 7, 1988, a public hearing was held to discuss 41 changes in station access, including the closing of entrances the corner of Nassau Street and Beekman Street.[53]

In 1988, the Charlie's Arcade subway entrance from Eighth Avenue and 42nd Street to the 42nd Street station was closed as part of that station's renovation, in which it received new stairways, flooring, and lights. The token booth and low turnstiles were removed and replaced by two high exit turnstiles.[54]

On February 16 and March 2, 1989, public hearings were held to discuss plans to modify station access at ten stations, including the closure of entrances at Fordham Road, 182nd–183rd Streets, and at 155th Street. At Fordham Road, exits at the northwest and southwest corners of Fordham Road and Grand Concourse and the 400 foot (120 m)-long passageway connecting to the control area at 188th Street were to be closed because the passageway was "an invitation to crime". These areas had only been open between 6 a.m. and 9 p.m.[55]

In April 1990, the MTA Board requested that NYCTA staff use the then-proposed Station Operating Guidelines, which covered the operation of high exit wheels, street entrances and auxiliary token booths, to evaluate auxiliary operations at 15 stations. The Guidelines were intended to expand the operation of auxiliary areas when they were well used, or reduce them when they were underutilized.

1991–1992[edit]

On March 20, 1991, a woman was raped behind a pile of debris the subway passageway connecting the 34th Street–Herald Square and 42nd Street–Bryant Park stations under Sixth Avenue during rush hour, which had entrances at 38th Street. This was the longest passageway in the system. Other commuters passed nearby but were unaware of what was happening. That passageway was closed the day after. It was used by 400 daily riders[56] and recorded 30 felonies since January 1, 1990. In response, on March 28, 1991, the NYCTA ordered the closing of the 15 most dangerous passageways in the system within a week, which the Transit Police and citizen advocacy groups had called for since the previous year. A women was raped in the passageway in July 1990 with no response, but after another rape took place in August, the passageway's closure was called for by the local community board in September when a women was raped in this passageway. Bureaucratic delays had prevented their closure, with their presentation to the MTA Board not scheduled until April 1991, after a public hearing on systemwide service reduction was to be held. The agency feared that closing the passageway without public comment would have caused an outcry for advocates for the homeless.[57] The NYCTA's director of public information said that the agency had erred in waiting for formal approval. The locations were chosen based on crime volume, lighting, traffic and physical layout. These entrances were closed under the declaration of a public safety emergency, and were blocked off with plywood and fencing until public hearings were held and official permission was obtained.[58] By closing the entrances, the transit police could deploy many officers to other parts of the system.

One of the entrances closed in 1991 at the Ralph Avenue station.

The nine stations affected in Manhattan were Canal Street with 83 felonies since January 1, 1990, 23rd Street with 46, 28th Street with 43, 50th Street with 94, Grand Central with 365, 14th Street with 125, Fifth Avenue–59th Street with 79, 110th Street with 52, and 168th Street with 54. The four stations in Brooklyn were Hoyt–Schermerhorn Streets with 88, DeKalb Avenue with 105, Ralph Avenue with 53, and Nostrand Avenue with 96. The one station in Queens was Woodhaven Boulevard with 30, and the one in the Bronx was Fordham Road with 79.[59] The areas closed included crossovers between uptown and downtown platforms, some high-entry turnstiles, little-used staircases to the street, and entrances at token booths scheduled to be closed.[60]

In February 1992, the NYCTA began a project to remove Iron Maidens, or High Entrance Turnstiles, which often did not work, being broken or locked, across the system. The MTA Board had recently granted permission to remove 61 of the 194 remaining Iron Maidens. Iron Maidens first appeared in the 1930 on the IRT, a model called "The American". 71 remained in 1992. Most of the regular turnstiles were built by the Perey Turnstile Company. 22 of its "Independent Perey" model, introduced in 1937, were still in place in 1992. Perey introduced a model with a device to push the token in in 1945, which jammed less often. 101 remained in 1992. Perey tested a new electronic turnstile in 1991, but it did not work. Iron Maidens installed in subway entrances not busy enough to justify a staffed booth.[61]

(List of 61 Iron Maidens to be removed)[62]

1992 booth closures

On February 28, 1992, the MTA Board was scheduled to vote reduce the hours at 17 token booths in Manhattan and Brooklyn. They were to approve a plan to reduce the hours at 13 stations in Queens and the Bronx the following month.[63][64] Action was deferred to allow board members to study the changes.[65]

Opposition to Woodhaven Boulevard closure[66][67]

A public hearing was held on October 19, 1992 and community information forums were held the following day as the MTA proposed to close high-entry turnstiles at 81 locations, and to close or restrict access to lightly used high-exit turnstiles, staircases and passageways at 15 locations to increase operating efficiency and to increase customer security.[68]

During the 1990s, New York City Transit undertook the Station Rehabilitation Program to renovate entire stations with additional customer amenities, modernized infrastructure, improved appearance, and operational improvements. As part of the Station Rehabilitation Program in the 1990s, station layouts were modified to fix safety, operating and/or service problems, requiring the closing, relocation or reducing the hours of secondary entrances. The changes, in addition to improve customer experience and security, were intended to reduce station operating costs. The changes generally consolidated fare control areas, reduced what the agency deemed to be "excessive mezzanine areas," modified or closed passageways and staircases with poor sight-lines and large areas outside of fare control. The renovations sought to modify station layouts so that secondary station elements were only open when well utilized, to keep riders from being vulnerable.[69]

Some closed subway entrances are used as emergency exits, like this one to the 21st Street station.

1993-1996[edit]

On June 28, 1993, a public hearing was held to discuss proposed access changes at the 14th Street/Eighth Avenue station and eight other stations. These changes were intended to maintain a balance between station operating costs, security and customer convenience. NYCT believed that station access needed to be shifted to take into account changes in ridership. The changes at 14th Street were to be made as part of the station's renovation. After extensive dialogue with the local community, NYCT proposed modifying the station layout to increase station operating efficiency, to improve customer convenience and security. As part of the plan, NYCT proposed consolidating the three token booths at the station (full-time booths at 14th Street and 15th Street and a part-time booth at 16th Street) into two full-time booths at 14th Street and 16th Street. The staircases at 16th Street would be open full-time, and two new staircases would be built on the northern corners of Eighth Avenue and 16th Street facing south. In addition, virtually all free-zone passageways would be eliminated and the number of street stairs to the mezzanine were to be reduced. In order to reduce congestion in the transfer passageway, it would be widened and a street stair would be moved. By eliminating almost all of the free-zone passageways, which were not in the view of the token booths, "the opportunity for rules violations and vandalism" would be limited. The changes were expected to save $50,000 annually due to the closure of a token booth.

In response to requests by the local community, the proposal was modified to retain the staircases at 15th Street for exiting between 6 a.m. and 9 p.m.. via high exit turnstiles, as opposed to removing them, and an entry staircase on the north side of 14th Street, and to have a continuous mezzanine within fare control between the 14th Street and 16th Street ends of the station. In addition, the exits at the southern corners of 17th Street and Eighth Avenue (S9 and S10), which had been open daily between 6 a.m. and 11 p.m. were closed, requiring 6,400 riders to walk 200 feet (61 m) to use the entrances at 16th Street. This entrance was closed because the staircases were isolated and connected to the rest of the station by a block-long passageway out of fare control, which was conducive to crime and vandalism. NYCT did not consider the retention of these entrances to save any walking effort, only weather-protection, because the token booth would be at 16th Street. Additionally, the staircase at the northeastern corner of 14th Street and Eighth Avenue, S2, was to be made exit-only, and was reconfigured to provide improved sightlines and to improve the transfer passageway in the station. However, this was later changed, with the exit being completely closed because its relocation was infeasible due to the presence of underground utility lines. Another change NYCT made was to relocate stair S1 at the northwestern corner of Eighth Avenue and 14th Street around the corner to face north on Eighth Avenue rather than west on 14th Street to provide room for a new elevator; initially this exit was going to be removed. However, this was changed again, with the elevator moved further west on 14th Street to provide adequate sidewalk space, allowing S1 to stay in place. The relocation of the elevator eliminated the community's concern that it visually impacted two adjacent landmarked buildings. One alternative plan to reconfigure the station would have placed the second full-time booth between 15th and 16th Streets or between 16th and 17th Street, which would have increased access points, but decreased inherent security, while another would have kept a third part-time booth. The staircases at the south end of the 8th Avenue platforms were widened.

In May 1994, a public hearing was held to discuss thirteen station access changes at 10 stations. Four of the stations (66th Street—Lincoln Center, 14th Street—Union Square, Chambers Street/World Trade Center/Park Place, and Main Street) were in the design phases of their rehabilitations.[70][71] The relocations of entrances at two of these stations (66th Street and Main Street) were intended to facilitate the installation of escalators and elevators. The changes at the six stations not in the rehabilitation program were intended to improve security or relieve congestion by closing lightly-used areas. These recommendations, with the exception of the changes at Queens Plaza, which received significant opposition, were forwarded to the MTA Board for approval in July 1994. These changes were expected to increase operation costs by $234,000 per year due to a net increase in token booth hours.

Opposition to Queens Plaza closure[72]

A request for a public hearing to discuss thirteen changes to be made at eight stations (Inwood—207th Street, 5th Avenue, Times Square/42nd Street, 34th Street—Penn Station, 33rd Street, 46th Street, Jackson Heights/Roosevelt Avenue and Metropolitan Avenue/Lorimer Street) as part of the Station Rehabilitation Program was put up to a vote by the MTA Board in December 1995, with public hearings scheduled for January or February 1996. The changes were estimated to reduce operating costs by $84,000, lower than the initial estimate of $245,000 stated in the initial notification of the hearing in November due to more accurate cost estimates. The public hearing for these changes took place on April 23, 1996, but by this point, the proposed changes at Jackson Heights/Roosevelt Avenue were dropped.

Opposition booth hours reduced 1995 High Street[73]

On March 10, 1996, New York City Transit announced that it planned to reduce its number of token booth clerks by 800 more, or by a third, over the following to years, with the rollout of the MetroCard. On that date, the number of token booth clerks employed in the system was reduced by 125, reducing the number of booths staffed by multiple employees in many busy stations to one during rush hours. The cuts in token booth clerks were made to help make up for cuts in State and Federal funding.[74][75]

2000s[edit]

After the September 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, some entrances at stations in Lower Manhattan near the World Trade Center site or institutions deemed as critical, such as the New York Stock Exchange, were closed for security reasons. Entrances closed included two at the southwestern corner of Wall Street and Broad Street to Broad Street, and one at the southwestern corner of Park Place and Broadway to Park Place.

Reopenings and making entrances full-time: post-2000[edit]

Closed entrance at West 71st Street and Central Park West.

Since the 2000s, New York City Transit has, due to political or community pressure, evaluated reopening select closed entrances in order to reduce travel times by reducing in-station congestion and walking times to alternate entrances. The reopening of station entrances has been hindered by the Federal Transit Administration's new interpretation of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), which stated that reopening closed entrances at stations not in compliance with the ADA would require the construction of elevators or ramps for reopened parts of the station. In NYCT's view, this outweighed the cost of upgrading the station; however, Section 202.4 in the 2010 ADA standards has a 20% threshold, which could be used as an indication that prohibitive amounts of money are not needed to reopen closed entrances.[76] Regardless, the reopening of entrances would often require substantial construction and would cost a significant amount due to the need to relocate New York City Transit facilities and equipment to provide additional egress, or changing land use. In other cases, reopening entrances would only require uncovering a stair, rehabilitating a previously closed area, and installing fare control devices. Some entrances likely cannot be reopened because they would not be compliant with NFPA guidelines on station egress times. However, opening others could ensure compliance with these regulations.

Several stations that have seen stations reopened after 2000 include an entrance at 70th Street and Central Park West to 72nd Street, entrances at Wallabout and Moore Streets and Broadway to Lorimer Street, entrances at South Portland Avenue and Lafayette Avenue to Fulton Street. The MTA's 2015–2034 Twenty-Year Capital Assessment, suggested the reopening of other closed subway entrances as an approach to improve station access and passenger flow.[77]

Other stations that have seen stations reopened were renovated. Several entrances reopened during renovations include entrances to the south side of Mosholu Parkway and Jerome Avenue at Mosholu Parkway, entrances to the east side of Fourth Avenue at Fourth Avenue/Ninth Street, entrances to 102nd Street and Liberty Avenue at 104th Street, and entrances to the north side of Avenue J at Avenue J. On February 11, 2019, the entrance at Seventh Avenue to Eighth Avenue was reopened to handle increased ridership at the station, as the station was being renovated to become ADA-accessible.

In the 2010s, there was further political and community pressure to reopen closed entrances.[78][79][80] Starting in 2015, a group of local residents from Northern Brooklyn began pushing the MTA to reopen closed station entrances in their neighborhoods, including Alan Minor. They created a group called ACCESS (Accessing Currently Closed Entrances to Subway Stations).[81] In response to a fall 2019 story by NY1 about ACCESS, a group advocating for the reopening of closed subway entrances, the MTA stated that they would review requests on a case by case basis.[82] On January 15, 2020, New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer delivered a letter to the New York City Transit Authority President Andy Byford, demanding that the Metropolitan Transportation Authority develop, and make public, plans for restoring the "abundance" of shuttered entry points along New York City Subway routes currently contributing to severe overcrowding and longer commute times.[83]

A and C Line Review[edit]

On December 11, 2015, New York City Transit released its review of the A and C lines. The report discussed the option of reopening closed station entrances along these lines. The study found that many stations along the two routes had closed staircases, with some "closed in the 1980s due to high crime and low ridership, with others closed for much longer." The study recommended reopening closed entrances at the following locations:

  • Classon Avenue to Franklin Avenue station
  • 167th Street to 168th Street station
  • 51st Street at 50th Street station, in the southbound direction

The cost of reopening these entrances was estimated to be between $2.7 million and $10.6 million. These stations are already ADA compliant, making work at these locations relatively cost-effective. The report concluded that if additional capital funding was provided, or if the FTA's interpretation of the ADA reverted its original flexible approach, reopening entrances at not just these stations but also many stops along Central Park West, at Spring Street, Nostrand Avenue, and Hoyt-Schermerhorn Streets, all non-ADA accessible stops, would become more feasible. The report included a non-comprehensive list of closed street stairs that lead to closed entry & fare control areas, not all street stairs closed; staircases deemed to have "limited potential utility" were not included on the list.[84]

The line review also included a case study, evaluating the reopening of entrances at the Nostrand Avenue station, which is not ADA-accessible. The station has two sets of closed entrances and the exits at Nostrand Avenue and Fulton Street are overcrowded. The case study found that reopening the closed Bedford Avenue entrance would reduce uneven loading on A and C trains and would ease congestion at the Nostrand Avenue entrances, in addition to cutting the walking distance for riders (especially bus riders) going to and from areas west of Nostrand Avenue. It also found that reopening an entrance at Fulton Street and Arlington Place to the northbound platform would provide similar benefits at a lower cost.[84] Ultimately, in February 2020, the Bedford Avenue entrances were chosen to be reopened by the end of that year.[85] The entrances reopened in February 2021.

Canarsie Shutdown[edit]

Ribbon-cutting for the reopening of entrances at Powers Street and Hope Street at the Metropolitan Avenue station.

In 2016, plans to completely shutdown the 14th Street Tunnel shutdown for 18 months (later reduced to 15 months) were announced, which would have temporarily eliminated L train service between Eighth Avenue in Manhattan and Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn. Riders were expected to use the G, J/Z and M instead. Therefore, the agency planned to reopen or expand more than 24 station staircases in order to handle the expected increase in riders at these stations. All improvements to stations were to be permanent. In January 2019, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced that a shutdown would not take place, with work being done overnights and weekends, allowing service to run through the tunnels at all times. Though some parts of the mitigation plans, including the operation of full-length G trains, were removed from the plan, the implementation of a busway along 14th Street and the reopening of entrances was maintained as part of the plan.[86][87][88]

The following entrances were reopened:

  • Entrances from Fayette Street and Broadway to Flushing Avenue, reopened on July 1, 2017 to handle crowding from the 14th Street Tunnel Closure and the Myrtle Avenue Line rehabilitation project.
  • Entrances from Hewes Street & Montrose Avenue and Broadway to Hewes Street, reopened on November 16, 2018.
  • Entrances from Hope & Powers Streets and Union Avenue to Metropolitan Avenue, reopened on February 28, 2019.[89][90] Entrances further south on Grand Street remained closed, however.

Making secondary entrances full-time[edit]

With the introduction of MetroCard and MetroCard Vending Machines, it was no longer necessary to have every secondary (or auxiliary) entrance have token booths, as the MVMs and new turnstiles could allow riders to obtain their means of payment and enter the system. Given that the staffing of token booths was the major cost of keeping additional entrances open, this meant that the hours of operation for secondary entrances could be increased without increasing labor costs. The MTA, starting in the late 1990s, began making entrances full-time with high entry/exit turnstiles, and started closing part-time token booths across the system.[91]

2003 709 open booths, 521 full-time, 188 part-time

Plan to close 177 booths-49 full-time booths, 128 part-time booths[92] ; reduced to 62[93]

45 booths part-time booths closed August 17, 2003; plan to close 17 more by end of year[94]

20 of the 45 part-time booths demolished by October[95]

Emergency intercoms installed at stations with closed booths[96]2005 Closing 164 booths[97][98][99]

[100]First 8 booths closed on May 22, 2005[101][102][103]

531 open booths in 2005[104]

158 booths closed 2004[105]

In 2006, the MTA started doing this on a broader scale, making many secondary exits open 24/7 with new emergency exits with panic bars, and new gates. This change was made to allow riders to get out safely in case of emergencies.[106]

Starting in the mid-2010s, the MTA began replacing high entry/exit turnstiles with low turnstiles, even in areas out of the line of sight of token booths, to increase station capacity. For instance, in August 2014, a pair of high-entry/exit turnstiles in the eastern mezzanine of the Kew Gardens—Union Turnpike station were replaced with a set of three low turnstiles.

[7]

Lists[edit]

Reopened entrances[edit]

As part of some station rehabilitation projects, closed subway entrances have been reopened. Reopening a subway entrance requires bringing stairs up to existing standards, including adding treads to them and evening them out. Turnstiles, security camera, signage, fare machines and Help Points also have to be installed.[107]

Station Division Line Borough Location Date closed Date Reopened Reason for Reopening ADA Accessible?
Atlantic Avenue–Barclays Center A (IRT)
B (BMT)
Eastern Parkway
Brighton Line
Brooklyn Southeastern corner of Atlantic Avenue and Flatbush Avenue (1)[108]
  • Accessed through reopened eastern crossunder (for IRT platforms).
  • Replaced two small street stairs to same corner of intersection.[109]
1954[110]-1980[111] September 17, 2012[112] Opening of Barclays Center Yes
Avenue J B (BMT) Brighton Line Brooklyn North side of Avenue J from Coney Island-bound platform 1980s?[113][114][115] 2010[116] Temporary exit for station renovation, made permanent No
Eighth Avenue B (BMT) Sea Beach Line Brooklyn East side of Seventh Avenue, at 62nd Street
  • Fare control area D001.
  • Closed due to high levels of vandalism, high maintenance costs, and low passenger volumes.
  • Planning Board 10 recommended reopening the entrance in 1978.[117]
  • Used as a MetroCard vending machine (MVM) maintenance shop while shuttered.[118]
April 1976[119][120][121] February 11, 2019[122] Station renovation Yes
Fort Hamilton Parkway B (BMT) West End Line Brooklyn West and east sides of New Utrecht Avenue between 43rd Street and 44th Street
  • Fare control area E002.
2011[123][124] Station renovation No
Flushing Avenue B (BMT) Jamaica Line Brooklyn Both eastern corners of Fayette Street and Broadway
  • Fare control area J008.
  • Entrance already closed in 1987 due to vandalism.
  • Station house kept closed.
c. March 1988 (permanent)[125][81] July 1, 2017[81] M train shutdown Yes
Fourth Avenue/Ninth Street B (IND) Culver Line Brooklyn East side of Fourth Avenue, between 9th and 10th Streets[126] Late 1960s or early 1970s February 23, 2012[127] Station renovation No
Fulton Street B (IND) Crosstown Line Brooklyn Both western corners of South Portland Avenue and Lafayette Avenue
  • Originally fare control area N421 (number since relocated to Clinton-Washington Avs); reopened as split fare control areas N422A & N422B.
    • Most of mezzanine kept closed.
  • Erroneously labeled closed in 2015 FOIL.
after August 1992[128] July 2005 (northbound)
2009 (southbound)[129][130]
Community pressure[131] No
Hewes Street B (BMT) Jamaica Line Brooklyn Northwestern corner of Montrose Avenue and Broadway[132]
Southeastern corner of Hewes Street and Broadway[133]
  • Fare control area J004.
  • Station house kept closed.
1970s or 1980s? November 16, 2018[134][135][136] L train shutdown No
Jefferson Street B (BMT) Canarsie Line Brooklyn Western corners of Jefferson Street and Wyckoff Street
  • Token booth removed by 1988[137]
  • Fare control areas H020 (northbound) & H021 (southbound).
  • The exit-only staircase at the northeastern corner either never closed as planned or was reopened by 2001.[118]:4
c. 1992[138] 2001-2008 (southbound)[118]:4[139]
unknown (northbound)
Lorimer Street B (BMT) Jamaica Line Brooklyn Both western corners of Broadway and Wallabout Street
  • Fare control area J006.
  • Erroneously omitted in 2015 map[140][141][142]
  • Station house kept closed.
1970s or 1980s? early 2000s, after January 18, 2001[143]

Station renovation

No
Metropolitan Avenue B (IND) Crosstown Line Brooklyn Northeastern corner of Powers Street and Union Avenue (1)
[144][145]
Northwestern corner of Hope Street and Union Avenue (1)[144][145]
  • Fare control area N410.[146]
  • Exit-only staircases by 1992[145][147][148][149]:E.138
  • Closed to improve security by concentrating riders at the full-time booth at Metropolitan Avenue[145]
    • 300 daily riders (at this exit, at Hope Street and Grand Street) required to walk an additional 500 feet (150 m)[145][150]
2000[151] February 28, 2019[152][153][89] L train shutdown No; planned
Nostrand Avenue B (IND) Fulton Street Line Brooklyn Mezzanine to both eastern corners of Bedford Avenue and Fulton Street (2)[154][155]
  • Fare control area N115.
  • Did not open initially with rest of the station.
    • Entrance structures in place (but without globes) in 1940;[156]; globes in place in 1942[157]
    • Used as exit-only stairs until 1950, after concerns from the Bedford-Stuyvesant Neighborhood Council.[158]
  • Entrance structure still existed in mid-1980s; eventually replaced with hatch (southeastern corner) & grate (northeastern corner).[159][160]
  • Crossover passage between platforms closed in April 1991 on an emergency basis, and made permanent in 1992.[60]
1981[161][85] February 4, 2021 Community pressure, with locally elected support (Tremaine Wright & Velmanette Montgomery) No; planned
59th Street–Columbus Circle A (IRT)/

B (IND)

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line

Eighth Avenue Line

Manhattan West side of 60th Street and Central Park West N/A 1990s[162] Expansion of Transit Police District Yes
72nd Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan Southwestern corner of 70th Street and Central Park West
  • Control Area N047
  • Had no HEETs
  • Was closed due to low ridership, with 200 entrances and 150 exits in the morning, and 75 entrances and 150 exits in the afternoon
  • Was open 7:15 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. and 4:25 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. M-F[163]
c. March 1988[125] September 2002[164][165] Community pressure, with locally elected support (assemblyman Richard N. Gottfried) No
Astor Place A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan Now a Kmart entrance to the downtown platform N/A c. 2000[166] Opening of Kmart No
Broad Street B (BMT) Nassau Street Mnhattan Northwestern corner of Cedar Street and Nassau Street to 140 Broadway [167] N/A 1966 Reopened and widened as part of construction of new buiiding No; planned
Broadway/Lafayette Street/

Bleecker Street

B (IND)

A (IRT)

Sixth Avenue Line

Lexington Avenue Line

Manhattan Eastern mezzanine to:
  • Southeastern corner of Lafayette Street and Houston Street (1)
  • Northwestern corner of Mulberry Street and Houston Street (1)[168]
N/A 2011-2012 Station expansion project Yes
Times Square–42nd Street/Port Authority Bus Terminal A (IRT)

B (BMT/IND)

42nd Street Shuttle

Broadway—Seventh Avenue Line

Flushing Line

Broadway Line

Eighth Avenue

Manhattan Southwestern corner of 43rd Street and Eighth Avenue, Stair S10/M11A/B
  • Control Area N060A
  • Had two HEETs
  • Was blocked off with a plywood barricade
Pre-2004[169] Pre-2009 Yes
104th Street B (IND) Fulton Street Line Queens Both western corners of Liberty Avenue and 102nd Street[84]
  • Fare control area N136.
Pre-1985[170] 2014–2015 Station renovation No
Aqueduct–North Conduit Avenue B (IND) Rockaway Line Queens Hawtree Avenue and 99th Place 1992[171] October 22, 1997[172] Improvements to serve Aqueduct Racetrack No
Beach 67th Street Southwestern corner of Beach 69th Street and Rockaway Freeway
  • Was completely intact in 2001 with a HET, and was exit-only[118]
Pre-2001 2010-2011[173] Station renovation No; planned
Mosholu Parkway A (IRT) Jerome Avenue Line The Bronx Northern corners of Mosholu Parkway South and Jerome Avenue[118] Before 1999[174] January 2008 Station renovation No; planned

Closed street entrances[edit]

Station Division Line Borough Location/Quantity[a] Date closed Control area Ridership (2017)[175] Ridership rank out of 425 (2017)[175] Number of exit points ADA Accessible?
45th Street B (BMT) Fourth Avenue Line Brooklyn Southwestern corner of 46th Street and Fourth Avenue (1); stair S1[176][177][146]
  • Southbound only.
  • Had one HEET.
  • Received new tiling in the station's 1970 renovation, but closed after being destroyed in an accident from nearby construction.
    • Community Board 7 held a meeting to determine whether residents wanted the entrance closed. The board's chairman wanted it to be sealed up, so the entrance was closed at the board's request.[178][179]
  • Blocked by a trapdoor and used as an emergency exit.[180]
    • Partially occupied by a porter's room.
c. 1979 2,390,684 205 1 No
Atlantic Avenue–Barclays Center A (IRT)

B (BMT)

Eastern Parkway
Fourth Avenue Line
Brighton Line
Brooklyn South side of Flatbush Avenue, between Atlantic Avenue and Pacific Street (2); stairs S1 and S3.[181][182][183][108]
  • IRT only.
  • Not accounted for in official MTA FOIL.
  • S1 slabbed over, S3 currently used as an emergency exit.[108]
1940[184]-1980[185] 13,571,093 21 Yes
Both southern corners of Atlantic Avenue and Fourth Avenue (2); stairs S3 and S4[186][187][46][188]
  • BMT only.
  • Entrances had yellow globes, and were part-time[189]
  • Entrance structure for the southwestern corner entrance still in place in the 1980s
  • Southwestern corner entrance repurposed into RTO office; street stair slabbed over.
  • Southeastern corner entrance repurposed into third rail office; street stair repurposed as an air vent and covered by a grate.
c. 1982
Atlantic Avenue B (BMT) Canarsie Line Brooklyn Southeastern corner of East New York Avenue and Van Sinderen Avenue (1); stair S2[190]
  • Staircase to street removed.[191]
  • Blocked by corrugated steel in the mezzanine.
  • Space used for lighting storage
N/A 557,103 403 1 No
Avenue M B (BMT) Brighton Line Brooklyn North side of Avenue M (1); stair S1/P9[192][113]
  • To Coney Island-bound platform only
  • Used as an emergency exit.
  • Not accounted for in official MTA FOIL.
N/A 1,828,941 261 1 (2 for northbound) No
Avenue U South side of Avenue U (1); stair S1/P1[193][194][113]
  • To north end of Coney Island-bound platform
  • Had HEETs; currently used as an emergency exit.
Before 1947[195] B025A 2,360,833 210 1 No
Bedford–Nostrand Avenues B (IND) Crosstown Line Brooklyn Both western corners of Bedford Avenue and Lafayette Avenue (2); stairs S7 and S8[196][197]
  • In a passageway.
  • Used for storage.
  • Entrances boarded up between November 2016[198] and September 2017[199] previously gated shut.[200]
2003[201]-August 2005[202] 2,779,124 186 2 No
Both eastern corners of Nostrand Avenue and Lafayette Avenue (2), Stairs S1 and S2[197][196][203][204][205]
  • In a passageway.
  • Entrance structure at the northeastern corner still in place in the mid-1980s; had a red globe[206]
  • Boarded up by adjacent property owners.
1983-1988
Bergen Street A (IRT) Eastern Parkway Line Brooklyn Northwestern corner of 6th Avenue and Bergen Street (1), Stair S6[207]
  • Constructed in 1916[208]
  • Still open in 1980
  • Used as an electrical/communication room[209]
1980-1986[210][211] 1,180,684 331 No
Bergen Street B (IND) Culver Line Brooklyn Southwestern corner of Warren Street and Smith Street, Stair S6 (1)[212]:6[213][214]
  • Southbound only.
  • Entrance slabbed over
  • Closed area of mezzanine near the entrance used as an electrical room/electrical panel room and for storage, refuse, and communication rooms.[215]
  • Not yet opened in 1940, along with the other Warren Street entrances[216][217]
  • Sealed off in 1965
  • Entrance structure still in place in 1980
  • Located on a blind corner.
1940[218]-1965[219][220] 3,525,144 143 No
Broadway B (IND) Crosstown Line Brooklyn Northeastern corner of Montrose Avenue and Union Avenue; stair S8 (1)[221]
  • Closed and slabbed over to allow for the enlargement of a Gulf gas station on the corner.[222][223][224]
1941-1958 N411 1,385,797 312 1 No
Southwestern corner of Broadway and Union Avenue; stair S1 (1)[221]
  • Likely intended to be temporarily closed only.
  • Boarded up, with flood barriers.
  • Currently allegedly closed as part of a contract to flood proof the station
1996[225]-October 2007[226]
Southeastern corner of Montrose Avenue and Union Avenue; stair S6 (1)
  • Slabbed over
1941-1967[227][228] N411
Northwestern corner of Johnson Avenue and Union Avenue; stair S5 (1)[215][221] N/A
Northwestern corner of South 5th Street and Union Avenue; stair S7 (1)[221]
  • Used as an emergency exit; had been sealed previously.
1941-1967[228][229]
Broadway Junction B (BMT/IND) Jamaica Line

Canarsie Line Fulton Street Line

Brooklyn Both eastern corners of Eastern Parkway and Broadway (2)[230]
  • Stair to southeastern corner removed.
  • Stair to northeastern corner still exists.[231]
  • Mezzanine used for employee facilities, including offices, Line Superintendent's Office, Electrical Closet, Locker rooms[232]
  • Closed to reduce costs[34]
  • At the time of their closure, these entrances were open from 6:10 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.[34]
c. 1988[34] J019 2,911,532 179 1 No; planned
Carroll Street B (IND) Culver Line Brooklyn Northeastern corner of 3rd Street and Smith Street; stair S2 (1)[212]:8[233][234][235][236]
  • Closed and boarded up due to low usage.
  • Slabbed over in 1949 to allow for the enlargement of a Shell gas station on the corner, over protests of local residents.[237]:1061
  • Used for storage.[238]
1933-1939[239][240] 3,537,661 142 2 No
Southwestern corner of 2nd Place and Smith Street; stair S1 (1)[212]:8[233][238][234][241]
  • Slabbed over, now covered by a Transit Garden[242][243]
1933-1949[244][245]
Chauncey Street B (BMT) Jamaica Line Brooklyn Southwestern corner of Marion Street and Broadway (1); stair S1/P1[246][247]
  • Used as an emergency exit.
  • Mezzanine used for a communications room, two EDRs
  • Signage from 1962 and 1970 shows the entrance as open[248]
  • Not gated off in mid-1980s, might have still been open[249][250]
1962[251]-1980s J018[146] 1,095,638 340 1 No
Northwestern corner of Pilling Street and Broadway (1); stair S2/P2[247][246]
  • Used as an emergency exit.
  • Mezzanine used for a communications room, two EDRs
Church Avenue A (IRT) Nostrand Avenue Line Brooklyn Second staircase to southwestern corner of Church Avenue and Nostrand Avenue (1)[252][253]
  • Southbound only
  • Likely replaced by elevator in the station's 1997 renovation.
c. 1997 2,916,680 178 1 Yes
Church Avenue B (BMT) Brighton Line Brooklyn East side of East 18th Street between Church Avenue and Caton Avenue (1)[254][146][255][256][257]
  • Southbound only
  • Opened in 1965 as part of a project to extend the station's platforms[258]
  • Was exit-only
  • Tiny bricked-up station house with two HXTs.[259]
  • Likely closed as part of the station's 1982 renovation.
c. 1982 5,455,527 83 2 No; planned
DeKalb Avenue B (BMT) Fourth Avenue Line
Brighton Line
Brooklyn Passageway to southeastern corner of Willoughby Street and Flatbush Avenue Extension (1); stair S7[260][261]
  • Covered by a grate and used as an emergency exit/air vent.[262]
  • A lot of machinery has been built in the passageway
  • Partially used as a Signal Maintenance Supervisor's Office
April 1991 (emergency)[60]
c. 1992
Yes
Eastern Parkway–Brooklyn Museum A (IRT) Eastern Parkway Line Brooklyn Eastern Parkway between Underhill Avenue and Washington Avenue (2)[203][263]
  • Constructed as part of platform extension project; not yet constructed in 1940.[264]
  • Used as emergency exits.
1966[265][266][267]-1985[268] R620[146] 1,530,635 301 1 Yes
Flushing Avenue B (IND) Crosstown Line Brooklyn Southern corners of Walton Street and Union Avenue (2), Stairs S3 and S4
  • Features mezzanine that allows for crossovers.
  • Mezzanine partially used for Normal and Emergency Transformer Closets, and an Ejector Pit
  • May have been closed in 1984 as Pfizer provided funding for security improvements as part of the Adopt-A-Station Program.
  • Southwestern corner entrance partly demolished due to development of surrounding area.
  • Southeastern corner entrance still in place until 2019; now slabbed over.[269]
  • May be considered for reopening; status unknown.[270]
c. 1984 N413 849,840 378 1 No
Fort Hamilton Parkway B (IND) Culver Line Brooklyn Northeastern corner of Prospect Avenue and Reeve Place (1)[271]
  • Entrance structure in place in 1940, but signage and globes removed.
  • May have never opened.
  • Slabbed over and covered by part of building.
1933-1940[272][273] 1,786,458 267 No
Franklin Avenue–Fulton Street[274] B (IND/BMT) Fulton Street Line

Franklin Avenue Line

Brooklyn Northeastern corner of Classon Avenue and Fulton Street; stair S4 (1)[275]
  • Has a very small booth; fare control area partially in place.
  • Did not open with the rest of the station, but was open in 1942.[276]
  • Not shown on 1986 neighborhood map.[277]
  • Slabbed over.[278]
  • May be reopened, pending funding.
Before 1965[279] N113A 2,058,258 239 1 Yes
Southeastern corner of Classon Avenue and Fulton Street; stair S3 (1)[275][280][281][282][277]
  • Did not open with the rest of the station, but was open in 1942.[283][284][285][286]
    • Entrance structure installed between 1940[287] and 1942[288]
  • Proposed to be reopened in September 1981 to accommodate transfers to B48 bus with the elimination of the Franklin Avenue Shuttle.[289]
  • Entrance shown as open on 1986 neighborhood map.
  • Entrance had red globes in the 1980s; was part-time only
  • Reopened and closed.
  • Slabbed over.
  • May be reopened, pending funding.
1965[290][279]-1981

after August 1992[128]

N114A
Gates Avenue B (BMT) Jamaica Line Brooklyn Northwest corner of Palmetto Street and Broadway (1), Stair S2/P2
  • Used as an emergency exit.
  • Leads to a closed mezzanine.
  • The mezzanine is used for a communications room and two Electrical Distribution Rooms (EDRs)[291]
1972-1975 J014 2,262,915 219 1 No
Southwest corner of Monroe Street and Broadway (1), Stair S1/P1[292][293]
  • Still open in 1940 and 1950s[294][295]
  • Shown as open in 1962 and 1972 signage[296][297]
  • Likely closed between 1972 and 1975 during a station renovation[297][298]
  • Already boarded up in the mid-1980s[299]
  • Used as emergency exits.[300]
Halsey Street Eastern corners of Jefferson Avenue and Broadway (2), Stairs S3 and S4[301]
  • Used as emergency exits.[302]
After 1965[303][304][279] J015[146] 2,131,177 233 1 No
Hoyt–Schermerhorn Streets B (IND) Crosstown Line

Fulton Street Line

Brooklyn Passage from the Bond Street exit to the southwestern corner of Bond Street and Livingston Street & now-defunct McCrory Stores (originally Loeser's Department Store), Stair S9[305][306][307]
  • Closed on an emergency basis in April 1991 and permanently in 1992.[308]
  • Slabbed over.
April 1991 (Emergency)
1992
3,264,293 157 No; planned
South side of Schermerhorn Street, west of Hoyt Street (1), Stair S6[215][275][309]
  • Located from a passageway leading to space now occupied by Transit Police Equipment and Supply
  • Leads to somewhere within the parking lot
  • Unclear if it ever opened
N/A
North side of Schermerhorn Street, west of Hoyt Street, under 187 Schermerhorn Street (1), Stair S7[215][275][309]
  • Located in passageway off of an open entrance
  • Easement entrance
Northeastern corner of Bond Street and Schermerhorn Street, under 33 Bond Street, Stairs S2 and S10 (2)[215][309]
  • One stair demolished after reconstruction of 33 Bond Street, one stair modified.
Southeastern corner of Bond Street and Schermerhorn Street (1), Stair S1[309]
  • Led to a parking lot, now occupied by a building
  • Unclear if it ever opened
North side of Schermerhorn Street, under 231 Schermerhorn Street, Stair S3 (1)[309]
  • Gated off on street level.
Hoyt Street A (IRT) Eastern Parkway Line Brooklyn Northwestern corner of Fulton Street and Duffield Street (1), Stair S4[215]
  • Closed during station modernization.[125][212]:21
    • Northeastern corner entrance eventually reopened, but fare control area still identified as closed.
  • Entrance structure removed 2014-2015.
1985
c. March 1988 (permanent)
(still open) 2,137,478 232 No
Jay Street–MetroTech B (IND/BMT) Fulton Street Line

Culver Line

Fourth Avenue Line

Brooklyn Southern corners of Fulton Street and Smith Street (IND only) (2), Stairs S1 and Stair S7[212]:22[203][310]
  • Was a part-time booth, only open during rush hours[311]
  • Secondary mezzanine
  • Passages blocked by 1990.[312]
  • Southwestern exit structure removed between 2012[313] and 2013; now used as an air vent.[314]
  • Southeastern entrance used as an air vent[315]
1980[316]-1986[317][318] N105[319] 13,007,176 22 Yes
Junius Street A (IRT) New Lots Line Brooklyn Western corners of Junius Street and Livonia Avenue (2)[320][146]
  • Closed due to crime on the bridge over the Bay Ridge Branch; repurposed into employee space.
  • Stairways to street removed between 1999 & 2001.
  • Portion of southbound platform and stair from southbound platform to mezzanine removed to accommodate the flyover to Linden Shops.
1980-1988 R631 298,119[b] 417 1 No; planned
Kosciuszko Street B (BMT) Jamaica Line Brooklyn Eastern corners of DeKalb Avenue and Broadway, Stairs S3/P3 and S4/P4 (2)[301][321][322]
  • Closed mezzanine
  • Used as emergency exits.[323]
  • Entrance to northeastern corner across B38 bus stop.
After 1974[324][325][326][327] J011[146] 1,979,192 248 1 No
Metropolitan Avenue/Lorimer Street B (IND/BMT) Crosstown Line

Canarsie Line

Brooklyn Northern corners of Grand Street and Union Avenue (IND only) (2), Stairs S1 and S2[328][329][330][331][332][145]
  • Exit-only staircases from a passage.[145]
    • Last open between 5:20 a.m. & 10:55 p.m. on Mondays to Fridays, and between 5:15 a.m. and 11:50 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.[78][145]
  • Done to improve security by concentrating riders at the full-time booth at Metropolitan Avenue[145]
  • 300 daily riders (at these exits and at Powers Street) required to walk an additional 500 feet (150 m).
  • Closed during station renovation project.[145][78]
  • Closure approved in 1995[333]
2000[334] 5,010,601 97 3 No; planned
Southeastern corner of Union Avenue and Metropolitan Avenue, stair S8.[212]:26[145][335]
  • Not accounted for in official MTA FOIL.
  • Closed during station renovation project.
    • The other staircase at this corner, which is on the opposite side of this staircasem was also supposed to be closed.[145]
  • Intended to help reconfigure the mezzanine to improve the transfer at the station for 13,000 riders[145]
  • To improve the transfer, a connection would have needed to be created in the mezzanine by putting into place a corridor within fare control across the free zone that was served by the pairs of street staircases on both side of Union Avenue, requiring the closure of one pair. It was decided to close the eastern staircases because they were much less used than the western staircases and because having the booth located adjacent to the western pair would allow transfer movement to be done more smoothly.[336]
  • 1,400 daily riders would have been required to walk an additional 90 feet (27 m) to the exits on the west side[145]
Western corners of Lorimer Street and Metropolitan Avenue (BMT only) (2),[212]:26[337] stairs S3 and S4[145]
  • Closed during station renovation project.[145]
  • Change made to improve security by concentration riders at the well-used stairs at the eastern corners of the intersection[145]
    • 580 daily riders required to walk an additional 70 feet (21 m)[145]
  • Used as emergency exits.[338]
Morgan Avenue B (BMT) Canarsie Line Brooklyn Northeastern corner of Morgan Avenue and Harrison Place (1), Stair S2[339]
  • Exit structure remains at street level.
2013-2014[340][341] 2,594,607 195 2 No
Myrtle–Willoughby Avenues B (IND) Crosstown Line Brooklyn Northwestern corner of Willoughby Avenue and Marcy Avenue, stair S1 (1)[342][343]
  • Southbound only.
  • Did not open with the rest of the station; opened sometime after 1940, when there was no entrance structure.[344]
  • Boarded up.[345]
c. 1978[346] N415A 1,765,653 268 1 No
Southeastern corner of Willoughby Avenue and Marcy Avenue, stair S2 (1)[342][343]
  • Northbound only.
  • Slabbed over.
N416A
Parkside Avenue B (BMT) Brighton Line Brooklyn Northeastern corner of Ocean Avenue and Woodruff Avenue (1)
  • From northbound platform[113]
  • Underground staircase.
  • Sealed up and used for storage by the Station Department.

N/A

No
Prospect Park B (BMT) Brighton Line

Franklin Avenue Line

Brooklyn East side of Ocean Avenue between Flatbush Avenue and Lincoln Road, stair S1.
  • Accessed from northern (former full-time) mezzanine via alleyway.
  • Not accounted for in MTA FOIL.'
  • Used as an emergency exit.[347]
    • Intermittently reopened for access to shuttle buses.

Southwestern corner of Ocean Avenue and Flatbush Avenue, stair S4.

  • Accessed from northern (former full-time) mezzanine via "northern most stairway to Flatbush Avenue."[138]
  • Not accounted for in MTA FOIL.'
c. 1992[138] Yes
Ralph Avenue B (IND) Fulton Street Line Brooklyn Western corners of Howard Avenue and Fulton Street (2), sTAIRS 1 AND 2[348]
  • Northwestern corner entrance boarded up,[349] southwestern corner slabbed over between 2014 and 2016.[350][351][352]
  • From a closed passageway leading to a closed half of the station mezzanine
c. 1992[59] N121C[146] 1,894,817 258 1 No
Southwestern corner of Ralph Avenue and Fulton Street (1), Stair S5[348][353][354]
  • Slabbed over.
  • Entrance directly at B47 bus stop.
Rockaway Avenue B (IND) Fulton Street Line Brooklyn Eastern corners of Thomas S Boyland Street and Fulton Street (2), Stairs S5 and S6
  • Did not open when station was opened.[355]
  • Removed by 1980[356][357]
  • Slabbed over.[358][359]
    • Northeastern corner (S6) area used by the Station Department.
  • Entrance to southeastern corner directly at B7 bus stop.
1968[360][361]-1980[362] 1,794,365 264 2 No
Seventh Avenue B (BMT) Brighton Line Brooklyn Northern corners of Sterling Place and Flatbush Avenue (2), stairs S1 and S2[118][363][364]:627[365]
  • Slabbed over
  • Southern mezzanine and two passageways connecting to the open mezzanine are closed off, and were formerly used for storage.[118][366]
  • Two stairs lead from each platform to the closed mezzanine
  • Closed booth is still in place
  • 2 HXTs lead from the closed fare control area
  • These entrances were not open during middays in 1930.[367]
  • South side staircase (S1) may be reopened as part of the station's accessibility solution[368]
  • NYCT Operations Planning recommended reopening the south side entrance and adding a new staircase next to it
1965[369][370][371][258]-1980[372][373] B005 5,105,535 90 1 No
Sutter Avenue B (BMT) Canarsie Line Brooklyn Eastern corners of Belmont Avenue and Van Sinderen Avenue (2)[374]
  • Erroneously identified as three stairs.
  • Entrance remnants used as emergency exits and equipment rooms[375][376][377]
  • Street stairs removed between 1980 and mid-1980s[378][379][380]
  • Mezzanine still exists[381]
1980-1988 H036 1,394,283 311 1 No
Pedestrian footbridge to western corners of Junius Street and Belmont Avenue (2)[382][383][384]
  • One stair not accounted for in MTA FOIL.
  • 300-foot long footbridge built as part of the grade-separation of the Bay Ridge Branch in 1910[385]
  • Removed between 1980 and mid-1980s[378][379][380]
  • Mezzanine still exists[381]
Utica Avenue B (IND) Fulton Street Line Brooklyn Northwestern corner of Stuyvesant Avenue and Fulton Street (1)[386]
  • Not accounted for in MTA FOIL.
  • May not have been opened.
  • Slabbed over.

N/A

2 Yes
North side of Fulton Street between Stuyvesant Avenue and Utica Avenue (1)
  • Not accounted for in MTA FOIL.
  • May not have been opened.
14th Street/

Eighth Avenue

B (IND/BMT) Eighth Avenue Line

Canarsie Line

Manhattan Southern corners of 17th Street and Eighth Avenue (2),[275][387] Stairs S9 and S10
  • Closed as a part of a station renovation project.
  • Entrance structures removed after 1995.[388]
  • Used as emergency exits.[389]
1994-1995 14,153,266 19 3 Yes
14th Street/Sixth Avenue B (BMT) Canarsie Line Manhattan North side of 14th Street between 5th Avenue and 6th Avenue.[390]
  • Not accounted for in MTA FOIL
  • Easement entrance
  • Passageway used for Lighting shop[391] and storage
by 1931[392] 2 No; planned
28th Street B (BMT) Broadway Line Manhattan Eastern corners of 29th Street and Broadway (2), Stairs S5 and S7[393][394][395]
  • Northeastern exit blocked by steel trapdoor and used as emergency exit
  • Southeastern exit slabbed over
  • Space partially used for a Communications Room
After 1945[396] A026 4,065,263 126 1 No
Western corners of 29th Street and Broadway, Stairs S6 and S8 (2)[397][398]
  • Northwestern exit blocked by steel trapdoor and used as emergency exit
  • Southwestern exit slabbed over
A028
(passageway between 14th Street/Sixth Avenue and 14th Street/Eighth Avenue Manhattan

No exits

April 1991 0
(passage between 34th Street–Herald Square and 34th Street–Penn Station) A (IRT)/

B (IND)

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line

Sixth Avenue Line

Manhattan To Pennsylvania Station under 33rd Street.
  • Located next to the basements of the Gimbels department store and the Hotel Pennsylvania.[399]
  • Passengers now must walk at street level to connect to the commuter railroads.[400]
  • A real estate developer, Vornado Realty Trust, proposed in 2010 to reopen the passageway in exchange for variances to build office towers replacing existing structures in the area.[401]
1986[402] 0
(passage between 34th Street–Herald Square and 42nd Street–Bryant Park) B (IND) Sixth Avenue Line Manhattan Northwestern, northeastern, & southeastern corners of Sixth Avenue and 38th Street (3); stairs S1, S2, & S3[403][404][405][406][407][408]
  • Intended to relieve passenger flow at the two stations.
  • Fourth stair to southwestern corner (possibly in a building) either unfinished or demolished before 1991.
  • 30 felonies occurred in the tunnel in 1990. It was used by 400 people daily.
    • After a rape in July 1990, transit police had tried to close it, but got stuck in bureaucracy.
    • Initially closed on March 21, 1991 after another rape; the TA declared an emergency to close the tunnel.
    • Permanently closed after a public hearing was held.[57]
  • Northern portion (from 42nd Street to 38th Street) converted to master signal tower for the Sixth Avenue Line starting in 2017.
March 21, 1991 0
(passage between 50th Street and 50th Street) A (IRT)
B (IND)
Broadway—Seventh Avenue Line

Eighth Avenue Line

Manhattan Paramount Plaza at the Northwestern corner of 50th Street and Broadway[409]
  • Runs between Broadway and Eighth Avenue
  • Opened in 1970
  • Reopened in December 2010[410]
  • Was open from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday-Friday
  • Blocked off by a roll down gate[411]
After September 11, 2001

2011-2017[412]

34th Street–Herald Square B (BMT/IND) Broadway Line
Sixth Avenue Line
Manhattan Southwestern corner of 33rd Street and Sixth Avenue (1)[146][413]
  • Near passage to Penn Station.
After 1940 39,672,507 3 Yes
Northwestern corner of 33rd Street and Sixth Avenue; stair SB2 (1)
  • Featured easement into Korvette's (later Modell's)[414]
  • Partly demolished.
N/A
Southeastern corner of Sixth Avenue and 34th Street; stair S3 (BMT)[415] (1) c. 1941[416]
34th Street–Penn Station A (IRT) Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line Manhattan

Amtrak concourse of Penn Station, B level (1)

  • Possibly fare control area R136.
  • Shown as open as late as 1985.
  • Near foot of escalators leading to 32nd Street; blocked by Amtrak homeless outreach office.
  • May reopen, pending Amtrak decision.[417]
N/A 26,034,238 6 3 Yes

LIRR concourse of Penn Station; stair O7 and (2)[417][169]:S.4–21

  • Possibly fare control area R136.
Passage to southeastern corner of 32nd Street and Seventh Avenue (1)[418][419]
  • Used by the Divison of Stations
1995
42nd Street–Bryant Park/Fifth Avenue A (IRT)
B (IND)
Flushing Line

Sixth Avenue Line

Manhattan Southwestern corner of Sixth Avenue and 40th Street, Stair S4
  • Shown on 2015 neighborhood map, but closed after 2011[420][421]
  • Entrance demolished and replaced by a new passageway entrance at 39th Street in 2015
2011-2015 16,594,289 14 4 No; planned
49th Street B (BMT) Broadway Line Manhattan Southeastern corner of 47th Street and Seventh Avenue (2)[422][423]
  • One of the two staircases was added in February 1931.[424]
  • Two street staircases[425] replaced by entrance underneath Plaza Hotel as part of a new development project[426][427]
c. 1989 8,626,669 38 2 Partially (Uptown-only; Downtown planned)
50th Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line

Queens Boulevard Line

Manhattan Eastern corners of 52nd Street and Eighth Avenue (3), Stairs S15, S16, and S17
  • Two at the northeastern corner.
  • Southeastern corner entrance in a building and gated off; northeastern corner entrances slabbed over.[428]
April 1991 (emergency)
1992 (finalization)[429]
N052 6,694,422 65 2 Partially (Downtown-only)
Western corners of 52nd Street and Eighth Avenue (2), Stairs S13 and S14
  • Was open 4 a.m. to 10:25 p.m..[430]
  • Slabbed over.
  • Northwestern corner entrance now used as an air vent.
N053

Southwestern corner of 51st Street and Eighth Avenue (southbound only) (1), Stair S11

  • Slabbed over.
  • To be reopened pending funding.[275]
1992 N055
Southeastern corner of 49th Street and Eighth Avenue (northbound only) (1), Stair S3 Before 1969[431] N058
59th Street–Columbus Circle A (IRT)/

B (IND)

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line

Eighth Avenue Line

Manhattan Northwestern corner of 61st Street and Central Park West; stair S6[432][433]:87–88, 320, 325
  • Closed sometime before 1980; reopened before 1990.[434]
    • Entrance played a pivotal role in the lawsuit Corinno Civetta Construction Corp V. City of New York, in which Civetta sued the city for damages for delays. Civetta claimed that the city failed to inform them of the existence of an abandoned subway entrance at this location, where there were constructing a storm sewer, even though the city was in possession of drawings showing the staircase. Work on the project was halted on January 15, 1980, upon its discovery. The NYCTA refused to allow the contractor to remove them since it was being used for the storage of equipment.[433]:68, 160–161 Though the contractor proposed to underpin the entrance on February 8, written approval was not provided by the NYCTA for 252 days.[433]:85
  • Had four staircases to the two IND platforms.
  • In October 1991, the MTA Board approved the NYCTA's proposal to close the high entrance turnstile at this location. Only 4 people used the entrance per day. A public hearing had been held on February 19, 1991.[435]
    • Was operated part-time, closing at nights, consisted of a high exit turnstile, and was used by 2400 daily passengers.
  • Closed again along with the reopening of S2 at 60th Street & Central Park West for an expansion of the Transit Police District Command; proposed at a public hearing in October 1992. It was located in a remote unmonitored portion of the station, making safety an added consideration for its closure.[436]
  • Now used as an emergency exit[437]
1932-1980
c. 1994-1995[435]
N048 22,929,203 8 Yes
72nd Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan Southwestern corner of 71st Street and Central Park West, with a connection between platforms concurrent with former exit location (1)[118][275][438][439]
  • Slabbed over
  • Temporarily uncovered to remove debris during station renovation in 2018.[440]
1932-1970s[441] N046A[146] 2,799,974 183 2 No
96th Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan Western corners of 95th Street and Central Park West, with a connection between platforms concurrent with former exit location (2), stairs S1 and S2.[275][442][443]
  • Entrance structure at NW corner entrance still in place in 1940, but subway globe removed and signage removed[444]
  • Slabbed over[445]
  • Used as a communications room
  • Had a pair of High Entry/Exit Turnstiles
November 1932[5] N041[146] 2,887,965 180 2 No; planned
103rd Street Western corners of 104th Street and Central Park West, with a connection between platform concurrent with former exit location (2)[118][275][446], Stairs S4 and S5[447]
  • Entrance structures in place in 1940, but stairways slabbed over[448][449]
  • Fare control area still in place, with a HXT
  • Used as employee space[450]
November 1932[5] N036 1,470,838 309 1 No
Southwestern corner of 102nd Street and Central Park West, with a connection between platforms concurrent with former exit location (2),[118][451][452] Stairs S1 and S2[447]
  • Sealed and paved over, but tiling from the entrance is still visible[450]
  • Fare control area still in place, with a HEET and a HXT
  • Used as a communications room[447]
After 1940 N038
110th Street A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan Southeastern corner of 111th Street and Lexington Avenue, Stair S6[118][146][453][454]
  • Originally exit only.[364]:612
  • Exit unstaffed.
  • Northbound only
  • Slabbed over[455]
  • Used for support space by Station Department
April 1991 (emergency)
c. 1992[59]
R253X 3,734,660 135 1 No; planned
Southwestern corner of 111th Street and Lexington Avenue, Stair S5[329][146]
  • Originally exit only; unstaffed[364]:612
  • Southbound only
  • Slabbed over
  • Used for support space by Station Department
1965[456][279]-1980s R255
110th Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan Northwestern corner of 109th Street and Central Park West, Stair S3 (1)[457]
  • Used as a scrubber room.
1995[458]-1997[459] 2,377,135 207 1 (2 for downtown) No
Northwestern corner of 111th Street and Frederick Douglass Boulevard, Stair S6 (1)[457][460]
  • Downtown only.
  • Had entry turnstiles & high-exit turnstile.
  • Slabbed over.
1932-1963 N032
Northeastern corner of 111th Street and Frederick Douglass Boulevard, Stair S7 (1)[457]
  • Uptown only.
  • Had entry turnstiles & high-exit turnstile.
  • Entrance structure still in place in 1940, but entrance globe removed, indicating the entrance was not yet opened, or was closed early on[461]
  • Reopened c. 1963 to replace the exit at the northeastern corner of 110th Street and Central Park West.
  • Slabbed over.[462]
1932-1940
c. 1992
N031
Northeastern corner of 110th Street and Central Park West, Stair S5 (1)[212]:100[459][457]
  • Uptown only.
  • Closed to allow for the construction of a gas station
    • Was initially slated to be rebuilt
    • Replaced by reopened exit at the northeastern corner of 111th Street and Frederick Douglass Boulevard
    • Slabbed over
c. 1963[275][463][464] N033
116th Street Northeastern corner of 118th Street and Frederick Douglass Boulevard (1), Stair S4[275][465]
  • Entrance structure still in place in 1941,[466] but signage and globes were removed.
  • May have never opened
  • Slabbed over in 1959.[467]
  • Reused as a refuse room by the Station Department.[215]
  • Erroneously shown on 1984 neighborhood map.[468]
1932-1941 N027[146] 2,253,473 222 1 No
Northwestern corner of 118th Street and Frederick Douglass Boulevard (1), Stair S3[275][465]
  • Entrance structure still in place in 1940,[469][466] but signage and globes were removed.
  • May have never opened
  • Slabbed over before 1980.[470]
  • Partially used by the Station Department-as a refuse room[215], and as a Communications Room
  • Blocked by a steel grate and used as an air vent.[471]
  • Erroneously shown on 1984 neighborhood map.[468]
N028[146]
125th Street East side of St. Nicholas Avenue between 125th Street and 124th Street (1), stair S1[472]
  • Space partially used for D.M. and an Office
  • Entrance structure still in place in 1987[473]
  • Sealed
ּBefore 1984[468] (still open) 9,335,382 32 2 Yes
Southeastern and northwestern corners of 126th Street and St. Nicholas Avenue (2), stairs S4, S7[275][474][475]
  • Proposed to be reopened to allow for the closure of the exits at the southern corners of 127th Street and St. Nicholas Avenue as part of the station's modernization.[40]
    • Public hearing on this change held on November 19, 1981, but the changes were not made.[40]
  • Mezzanine cut down after February 2001.[476][477]
  • Exit at southeastern corner used as an air vent and blocked by a steel grate
  • Exit at the northwestern corner covered by a trapdoor and used as an emergency exit.
1962[478]-1981[40] (still open)
145th Street B (IND) Concourse Line

Eighth Avenue Line

Manhattan Northwestern corner of St. Nicholas Avenue and 146th Street (1), Stair S5[479][480]
  • Had high exit turnstile, and free zone passageway.
  • Structure still exists at street level, stairs blocked by trapdoor.[481]
  • Used as an emergency exit.[482]
  • Open only for police use in the NYPD Precinct occupying the middle section of the mezzanine
c. 1992[483] 7,714,122 48 2 No
155th Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan Southern corners of 153rd Street and St. Nicholas Avenue; stairs S1 and S2 (2)[484][485]
  • Closed due to low usage and safety.[55][275]
  • Eastern entrance currently used as emergency exit.[486] and for employee space[146]
  • Had consisted of high entrance/exit turnstiles[487]
  • There was a passageway from the staircases to the southern parts of the platforms
  • Mezzanine partially occupied by various Station Department rooms, an Electric Tool Room, Track Tool Room, and a Track Superintendents Office
July 1989[488] N018 887,427 373 1 No
163rd Street Southern corners of 163rd Street and St. Nicholas Avenue (3)[489], Stairs S4, S5, S6
  • 2 to southwestern corner (facing north and south)[275]
  • Southeastern corner exit temporarily uncovered to remove debris during station renovation in 2018[490]
c. March 1988[125] N015[146] 1,437,340 310 1 No
168th Street A (IRT)
B (IND)
Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line
Eighth Avenue Line
Southeastern corner of 167th Street and St. Nicholas Avenue,[491] Stairs S3 and S8 (2)[492][493][489]
  • Entrances, a highwheel exit and a highweel entrance, and the free-zone passageway to 168th Street were closed in April 1991 on an emergency basis;[59] closure finalized in 1992.
  • Closed stairways to platform already closed by 1991
  • Used for storage, and for a crew room.
  • Slabbed over on street level, barricaded by plywood on mezzanine level.
  • To be reopened pending funding.[275]
April 1991 (emergency)
c. 1992
N014 7,945,871 45 3 Partially (IND only; IRT planned)
Mitchel Square Park, south side of 167th Street, Stairs S1 and S2 (2)[492][494]
  • Entrance structures still in place in 1980.
  • To be reopened pending funding[275]
  • Former free zone passageway on the west side of the mezzanine to the open mezzanine at 168th Street is used for station maintenance lighting zone.
  • Western exit, Stair S1, used as an emergency exit and blocked by steel trapdoor
  • Eastern exit, Stair S2, slabbed over
  • Used for storage, car maintenance and crew room.
1984[489]-1991 N014A
175th Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Passageway to southeastern corner of 174th Street and Fort Washington Avenue, Stair S1 (1)[495]
  • Entrance structure with red globes still in place in the mid-1980s[496]
  • Permanently closed and sealed after a June 1994 MTA Board vote, after having been closed for several years[497][498]
1984[489]-1988 4,112,450 124 2 Yes
190th Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan Margaret Corbin Drive near Cabrini Boulevard, Stair S4 (1)[499]
  • Led to interior of elevator head house
  • Gated off
N/A 1,494,996 303 2 No
Bowery B (BMT) Nassau Street Line Manhattan Western mezzanine to western corners of Kenmare Street and Bowery, Stairs S1 and S2 (2)[500][501]
  • Built into buildings on Kenmare Street[502]
  • Southwestern exit (S2) is an emergency exit. This space is partially used as storage space for Nom Wah Nolita. The MTA reached an agreement to repurpose a part of this space as an emergency exit in 2005.
1940[503]-1980s[504] 1,327,970 321 1 No
Median of Delancey Street east of Bowery (1)[501][505] 1910-1940[506]
Broad Street

Southwestern corner of Broad Street and Wall Street, outside the New York Stock Exchange; stairs S5 and S7 (2)

  • Stair S7 closed much earlier, stair S5 closed after NYSE security perimeter revised.
  • Proposed to be slabbed over in 2017 at the NYPD's recommendation as part of the NYSE's security perimeter, which was installed to protect from a possible terrorist attack after the September 11, 2001 attacks; [507][508][509]
  • Entrance structures removed and sealed in fall 2019.[510]
2002 (S7)
2012 (S5)
2,056,754 240 No; In progress
Northwestern corner of Cedar Street and Nassau Street (1)[511][512]
  • In passage to east side of Nassau Street at Cedar Street
  • Blocked by a steel trapdoor and used as an emergency exit.[510]
1999[513]
West side of Nassau Street between Pine Street and Wall Street, Stair S3 (1)[512]
  • Sealed to reduce maintenance costs;[510] used by Station Department
c. 1992[514]
Southwestern corner of Broad Street and Exchange Place, Stair S11 (1)
  • Removed to reduce maintenance costs; location on platform can be made out by sloped ceiling.[510]
Broadway/Lafayette Street/

Bleecker Street

B (IND)

A (IRT)

Sixth Avenue Line

Lexington Avenue Line

Manhattan Western corners of Broadway and Houston Street (2),[515] Stairs S10 and S11
  • From western mezzanine
  • Repurposed into employee facilities, locker rooms
  • Slabbed over
N/A 11,956,465 24 Yes
Northeastern corner of Houston Street and Mercer Street (1),[515] Stair S12
  • Slabbed over trap door and ladder
  • Repurposed into employee facilities, locker rooms
  • From western mezzanine
Western corners of Bleecker Street and Lafayette Street (2)[515]
  • To downtown IRT platform
  • Relocated and sealed
Brooklyn Bridge–City Hall/Chambers Street A (IRT)

B (BMT)

Lexington Avenue Line

Nassau Street Line

Manhattan Underneath 1 Centre Street, the Municipal Building (3), Stairs S8, S9 and ?
  • The one north of the open exit (S8) is labeled as exit only
    • Stairway to street removed[516]
    • Retain entrance structure
  • The one to the east of the open exit is blocked by a steel grate and is used as an air vent
  • The one to the west of the open exit (S9) is sealed and was converted to a hydraulic pump room[517][518]
N/A 9,360,484 31 Yes
Brooklyn Bridge walkway (1)[519][520][521][522]
  • Mezzanine stairs (M2A/M2B) and street stair (S2)
  • Mezzanine stairs sealed between 1999 and 2001
  • Work removing entrance completed in August 2000[523]
  • Entrance closed as part of renovations to the Brooklyn Bridge walkway[524]
  • One of the three original staircases to the station
1999 (still open)
Northwestern corner of Centre Street and Duane Street, Stair S1 (1)[512][518]
  • Slabbed over and used for communications room.
c. 1992[525][518][526][527] (still open)
Canal Street A (IRT) Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line Manhattan Southeastern corner of Laight Street and Varick Street (2),[146][528][529] Stairs S1 and S2
  • From a passage
  • Northbound platform only
  • Space used by the Station Department
  • To make room for the construction of the Holland Tunnel exit plaza, a subway entrance at the station was reconstructed.[530] In 1926, New York City, the New York State Bridge and Tunnel Commission, and the New Jersey Interstate Bridge and Tunnel Commission, reached an agreement to construct a passageway from the south side of Canal Street to the south side of Laight Street on the east side of Varick Street to replace the entrance.[531][532][533][534]
c. 1992[535] 1,756,236 269 1 No
Southeastern corner of Canal Street and Varick Street (1)[146][536]
  • Space used for Storage
Canal Street A (IRT)

B (BMT)

Lexington Avenue Line

Nassau Street Line

Broadway Line

Manhattan Northeastern corner of Canal Street and Centre Street (1)[537]
  • 1996 renovation turned it into an emergency exit.[538][539]
  • Accessed from inside a building
  • A portion of the exit is occupied by a store[540]
Late 1960s 16,285,516 15 3 Partially

(IRT only)

Southeastern corner of Canal Street and Centre Street (2)[541][542][543]
  • Northbound Nassau Street Line platform only.
  • Has an abandoned token booth.
  • Likely closed as part of the station renovation project in 1996.
November 1995-July 1997[544][545]
Second staircase to the Northeastern corner of Canal Street and Lafayette Street; stair S7 (1)[546]
  • Used as an electrical panel room[146]
After 1940
Second staircase to the Northwestern corner of Canal Street and Lafayette Street (1)[547]
  • Later replaced by elevator
Second staircase to the Southwestern corner of Canal Street and Lafayette Street (1)[548]
Canal Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan Passageway to:
  • Southeastern corner of Grand Street and Sixth Avenue (1),[549]
    • Closed off by trapdoor[550] Stair S7
  • Southwestern corner of Sullivan Street and Sixth Avenue (1),[551] Stair S8
    • Slabbed over.
  • Used for employee rooms.[550]
  • Had HXT and HET to the downtown platform.
April 1991 (emergency)[60]
c. 1992
5,932,386 75 No
Passageway to Southeastern corner of Walker Street and West Broadway (1),[552][551][553] Stair S2
Chambers Street–World Trade Center/Park Place/Cortlandt Street A (IRT)/

B (IND/BMT)

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line

Eighth Avenue Line

Broadway Line

Manhattan Northeastern corner of Warren Street and Church Street; stair S16 (1)
  • Consisted of a high entry turnstile and was located at the south end of a lightly used area outside of fare control; used by 1,300 weekday riders, 1% of the station's traffic
  • Closed due to low usage and poor sightlines from token booth.
    • Sealed & converted to office and storage space.[555][556]
c. 1994 16,079,624 16 Partially

(World Trade Center and Cortlandt Street only)

Outside 6 Park Place, at southeastern corner of Park Place and Broadway (1)
  • Replaced with stair directly to the corner to close a windy passageway to the IRT platform from the Church Street token booth[556]
Southeastern corner of Park Place and Church Street (1)[556]
  • Replaced with new stair to same corner and elevator in 2017[557]
2013-2014[558]
Delancey Street/

Essex Street

B (BMT/IND) Nassau Street Line

Sixth Avenue Line

Manhattan Southern corners of Rivington Street and Essex Street (IND only), stairs S7 and S8 (2)[559][146]
  • North end of northern IND mezzanine.
    • Part of mezzanine area used as an electrical distribution room, electrical distribution reserve, transformer closets, an electrical panel closet, and a signal tower.
  • Southeastern corner exit (S8) currently used as an emergency exit and blocked by trapdoor.[560]
  • Southwestern exit (S7) covered with metal grate & used as an air vent.[561]
1960s[559]-2000 N524[146] 8,128,719 44 2 No; planned
Southern corners of Broome Street and Essex Street (IND only), stairs S1 and S2 (2)[146]
  • South end of southern IND mezzanine.
    • Much of mezzanine area empty; partially used for storage of rock and soil samples
  • Southeastern corner exit (S2) currently used as an emergency exit and blocked by trapdoor.[562]
  • Southwestern corner exit (S1) slabbed over
  • May have never opened.
N/A N527[146]
Essex Street mall (BMT only) (1)[563]
  • Led to east end of Brooklyn-bound platform.[564]
  • Replaced by new entrance at the southwestern corner of Norfolk Street and Delancey Street; change made to eliminate the need for passengers to cross dangerous Delancey Street to enter the subway.
December 28, 1950

Southwestern corner of Norfolk Street and Delancey Street (BMT only), stairs S11 and S12 (2)[565]

  • Booth A62
  • Opened on December 28, 1950 to replace the entrance to the Essex Street mall.[563]
  • Was closed from 9:30 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. until 1981, when the entrance was closed at all times
  • Temporarily reopened in 1989 when the side platform was being renovated
  • May have been temporarily reopened in 1999 during renovation of Williamsburg Bridge.[566]
  • The western of the two exits is used as an emergency exit[118][567]
  • The easternmost of the two exits was slabbed over[567]
1981[568]

1989[569]
September 1, 1999[570]

A062
Southeastern corner of Norfolk Street and Delancey Street (BMT only), stair S10 (1)
  • Booth A62
  • Was closed from 9:30 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. until 1981, when the entrance was closed at all times
  • Temporarily reopened in 1989 when the side platform was being renovated
  • Temporarily reopened for exits only in 1999 during renovation of Williamsburg Bridge.[571][572][573]
  • Used as an emergency exit[118][574]
A062
Second staircase to the Northeastern corner of Norfolk Street and Delancey Street (BMT only) (1)
  • Slabbed over
  • Space used partially for a street hydraulic pump, and for an Electric Panel Room
  • Removed by the mid-1980s[575]
Before mid-1980s
Northwestern corner of Suffolk Street and Delancey Street (BMT only), Stair S2 and ? (2)
  • Slabbed over
  • Space used for a street hydraulic pump
  • Removed by the mid-1980s[576]
c. 1921[577][578]
East Broadway B (IND) Sixth Avenue Line Manhattan Northeastern and southwestern corners of Henry Street and Rutgers Street, Stairs S3 and S4 (2)[579]
  • Slabbed over
  • Entrance at northeastern corner may have never opened
  • In 1934, prior to the station's opening in 1936, the entrance at the northeastern corner had an entrance structure without globes[580]
  • By 1940, the entrance structure for the northeastern corner entrance was removed and slabbed over[581]
  • Space occupied by room
1936-1940 4,458,909 110 No; planned
Northeastern corner of Madison Street and Rutgers Street,[579] Stair S2;[582] may be reopened (1)
  • Sealed up
  • Used by Structure Department
  • Considered for reopening.[583]
1936-1961[584]
Fulton Street A (IRT)

B (IND/BMT)

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line Lexington Avenue Line

Eighth Avenue Line

Nassau Street Line

Manhattan Northwestern corner of John Street and Nassau Street (BMT only), stair O6 (1)[512][585]
  • Northbound only.
  • Repurposed as an entrance to several small businesses
  • The passage to fare control might have been repurposed as a massage parlor.
  • The passage from the northbound platform is used for employee facilities.
c. March 1988[125] A078 26,838,473 5 Yes
Southwestern corner of John Street and Nassau Street (BMT only), stair S7 (1)[512][585]
  • Northbound only.
  • Blocked by a door on street level[586]
  • The passage to fare control from the northbound platform is used for employee facilities by the Station Department
Northeastern and southeastern corners of Beekman Street and Nassau Street (BMT only), Stairs S1 and S2 (2)
  • Southbound only.
  • The northeastern exit is used as an employee exit and is blocked by a steel trapdoor[586]
  • The southeastern exit is blocked by a steel grate and is used as an air vent
  • The ramp from the southbound platform is used for employee facilities by the Station Department
A079
Southwestern and northwestern corners of Ann Street and Nassau Street (BMT only), Stairs S5 and S6 (2)[512]
  • The exit to the southwestern corner is blocked by a steel grate and used as an air vent[586]
  • The exit to the northwestern corner is inside a store
  • The former fare control area is used as an electrical communication room
  • Partially used as scrubber rooms on both platform levels
  • May have closed when underpass at location of entrance was closed.
November 1991-1992[587] A076
Southeastern corner of Ann Street and William Street (IRT only) (1),[588] Stair O4
  • In a building[589]
  • Accessed by winding passageways
  • Now houses HVAC equipment
N/A
Southwestern corner of Dey Street and Broadway (IRT only) (3)[590][591]
  • Two to sidewalk of Dey Street, one to Broadway
  • Closed due to the construction of the Fulton Center
2007-2009
Southeastern corner of Broadway and John Street (IRT only) (1)[592]
  • Closed due to construction of Fulton Center
  • Demolished or converted to storage area
  • Slabbed over[593]
2011-2012
Northeastern corner of William Street and Fulton Street (1) Before 1929
Northeastern corner of Broadway and Fulton Street (1)[595]
  • Originally, an IRT entrance to the station
  • Removed in 1933 with the opening of the IND
1933
Northwestern corner of Broadway and Fulton Street (1)[595]
  • Originally, an IRT entrance to the station
  • Removed and replaced with an IND entrance in 1933
Lexington Avenue/59th Street A (IRT)
B (BMT)
Lexington Avenue Line
Broadway Line
Manhattan Southwestern corner of 59th Street and Lexington Avenue, Stair S4 (1)
  • Replaced by a new exit
N/A 17,888,188 11 3 No
South Ferry A (IRT)

B (BMT)

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line

Broadway Line

Manhattan Outside of Staten Island Ferry Terminal (1)
  • Closed temporarily after a fire in 1991[596][597]
  • Temporarily replaced with an entrance in Peter Minuit Plaza
  • Closed with opening of new station in March 2009.
  • Temporarily reopened on April 4, 2013, and closed again on June 27, 2017.
2009
2017
10,205,836 29 Partially

(IRT only)

Peter Minuit Plaza (1)
  • Temporary trailer entrance constructed while the Ferry terminal was being renovated[598][487]
  • Replaced by entrance directly into the Ferry Terminal
2005
Spring Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan Northeastern corner of Sixth Avenue and Prince Street, Stairs S9 and S10 (2)[599]
  • Entrance parallel to Prince Street blocked by trapdoor.
  • Entrance parallel Sixth Avenue sealed.
1940-1981[600] N084 3,637,863 140 No
Southeastern corner of Prince Street and MacDougal Street, Stair S7 (1)[601]
  • Sealed.
Both western corners of Charlton Street and Sixth Avenue, Stairs S6 and S8 (2)[275]
  • Sealed
  • Easement for entrance at the southwestern corner released in 1963[602]
1932-1963[600] N085
Northwestern corner of Vandam Street and Sixth Avenue, Stair S5 (1)
  • Located in a building.
  • Easement relinquished in 1962.[603]:236–237
  • Used for storage.
1932-1962 (still open)
Southeastern corner of Spring Street and Sixth Avenue, Stair S2 (1)
  • Was slabbed over in 1940; may have never opened[604]
  • Covered by restaurant extension.
1932-1940 (still open)
Times Square–42nd Street/

Port Authority Bus Terminal

A (IRT)
B (BMT/IND)
42nd Street Shuttle

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line
Flushing Line
Broadway Line
Eighth Avenue Line

Manhattan Northeastern corner of 42nd Street and 7th Avenue, by 1 Times Square, stair S10/M12[605][606][607] (1)
  • Allowed for the closure of part-time booth R150, which had operated between 3:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.[608]
  • Closed to reduce operating costs[608]
  • 1,000 daily riders used the entrance[608]
  • Changes made during the renovation of Times Square[608]
  • Blocked by a steel grate and used as an air vent
  • Occupied by an employee room/retail and a police booth
1998-2000 R150 64,815,739 1 Partially (except 42nd Street Shuttle, in progress)
Western corners of 41st Street and 7th Avenue (2), Stairs S1 and S3[297][608][609][169]
  • Allowed for the closure of part-time booth R141, which was in operation between 3:00 p.m. and 6:30 p.m., weekdays, and that was operated with high exit turnstiles between 6:00 a.m. and 9 p.m. daily[608]
  • Closed to decrease operating costs and to improve safety
  • Used by 2,000 riders daily, and by 500 riders when the booth was open
  • Changes made during the renovation of Times Square
  • Entrance at the southwestern corner (S1) blocked by a steel grate and used as an air vent[610]
  • The bottom is blocked by a concrete masonry wall
  • Entrance used as a scrubber room
  • Entrance at the northwestern corner (S3) later reopened via an easement entrance
R141
South side of 41st Street between 7th Avenue and 8th Avenue, in passageway[611][612] [613]stair M12A, M12B, M13, S13 (1)[614]
  • At top of the inclined ramp
  • In January 1989, the MTA Board approved New York City Transit's request to close the entrance
  • Was exit-only
  • Was used by fewer than 20 passengers per day
  • Closed because it was regularly used as a restroom or shelter for homeless people, and as a hiding place for muggers
  • The owner of the building that the exit was adjacent to, 230 West 41st Street, hired full-time security guards to protect its occupants, and requested that the exit be closed
  • The staircase at street level was entirely removed and the entrance was sealed off
  • Used as an electric panel room[610]
c. 1989
Southeastern corner of 41st Street and 8th Avenue (1)[615][616]
  • Closed as part of modernization project
c. 1981
Northeastern corner of 41st Street and 7th Avenue (2)[608]
  • Street stairs replaced by one on the Southeastern corner of 41st Street and Seventh Avenue
  • Full-time booth R145 relocated from the northeastern corner to the southeastern corner
  • Improved circulation and orientation in the mezzanine
  • Improved street access for 75% of riders using this control area
  • Changes made during the renovation of Times Square
1998-2000
Northwestern corner of 41st Street and Broadway, Stair S8/M8 (1)[169]
  • Slabbed over
Before 1992
North side of 42nd Street, between Broadway and 6th Avenue (1)[617][618]
  • Easement entrance
  • Blocked by employee space and a high voltage substation
  • May have been demolished
  • Has a red globe to indicate the entrance on the sidewalk of 42nd Street[619]
Before 1992 old R153
Southwestern corner of 43rd Street and Broadway, stair S12 (1)[608]
  • Directly served former uptown platform (Track 4 of the 42nd Street Shuttle)
  • About 2,700 riders used this entrance[608]
  • Was closed overnight when the shuttle was not in service
  • Closure originally planned in the 1990s/2000s reconfiguration plan of 42nd Street Shuttle
    • In response to requests to keep the entrance open until the shuttle reconfiguration was complete, New York City Transit stated that the entrance was awkwardly located and that it would not be necessary with the opening of the new entrance on the south side of 42nd Street between Seventh Avenue and Broadway, and that it was looking into opening an exit on the east side of Broadway between 43rd Street and 42nd Street.[620]
    • Exit ultimately closed as shuttle was being reconfigured.
October 19, 2019[621]
Wall Street A (IRT) Broadway—Seventh Avenue Line Manhattan Southeastern corner of Pine Street and William Street (1)
  • Removed and slabbed over
After 1944 No
Southwestern corner of Pine Street and William Street, Stair S5 (1)[622][623]
  • Entrance covered with steel grate and used as an air vent and electrical room
  • Fare control area used as employee space
  • Some of the stairs were removed[624]
After April 1992[625]
Northeastern corner of Pine Street and William Street (2)
  • Removed and slabbed over in 1948 in order to provide space for an entrance to a new church, and to allow Pine Street to be widened while providing sufficient sidewalk space[626]
By 1944[627][628]
Northwestern corner of Pine Street and William Street (1)
  • Removed and slabbed over
After 1944
West Fourth Street–

Washington Square

B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line

Sixth Avenue Line

Manhattan Southwestern corner of Washington Place and Sixth Avenue, Stair S4 (1)[629]
  • To lower mezzanine
  • Slabbed over in 1999.
  • Area used for carbon dioxide cylinder storage
  • Used for hauling trash out of the station and for deliveries[630]
  • Blocked by a trapdoor and used as an emergency exit
c. 1946[631][632] 13,849,130 20 2 Yes
Southeastern[633] corner of West Fourth and Sixth Avenue, Stair S3 (1)[275]
  • To lower mezzanine[629]
  • Space in the lower mezzanine in front of the entrance used for structure storage and NQ2 Structure Night Force.
  • Did not open with the rest of the station on September 10, 1932, and opened some time after that year.[634]
  • Slabbed over in 1999 as part of the renovation of Golden Swan Park.[635]
  • A portion of the entrance is used as an air vent, while the rest of the space is occupied by a garden.[636]
Northwestern[633][637] corner of West Fourth Street and Sixth Avenue, Stair S6 (1)[275]
  • To lower mezzanine[629]
  • Area used for carbon dioxide cylinder storage
  • Entrance partially covered by a steel trapdoor, remainder slabbed over; a ladder has replaced some stairs[638]
  • Did not open with the rest of the station on September 10, 1932, and opened some time after that year.[634]
  • Entrance structure removed by mid-1980s[639]
Southwestern corner of Greenwich Avenue and Sixth Avenue, Stair S10 (1)[630]
  • Easement relinquished in 1962[640]
  • Used for storage by MOW Tunnel and Lighting
  • In area off of the sidewalk now blocked by plywood
  • Slabbed over in 1999.
1932-1962 (still open)
21st Street B (IND) Crosstown Line Queens North side of 48th Avenue between Jackson Avenue and 11th Street, Stair S1 (1)[641]
Southeastern corner of Jackson Avenue and 48th Avenue, Stair S2 (1)
  • Includes southern third of mezzanine.
  • May have never opened.
  • Slabbed over by 1948;[237] mezzanine area used for storage/store room.[642]
1933-1936[643] N402 598,061 397 1 No
Western corners of 47th Road and Jackson Avenue, Stairs S3 and S4 (2)
  • May have never opened.
  • Entrance structures still existed in 1940, but signage and globes were removed; southwestern corner exit eventually slabbed over.[644]
  • The northwestern corner exit is used as an emergency exit.[645]
  • Includes the middle third of the mezzanine and a passageway connecting to the open control area
1933-1936[646][647]
33rd Street–Rawson Street A (IRT) Flushing Queens Eastern corners of 34th Street and median of Queens Boulevard (2); stairs S1 and S2[648]
  • Booth closed c. 1992; had been open 2:30 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. M-F.[649]
  • Intended to improve customer security by concentrating riders at two street stairs.[648]
  • Half of the riders at the control area had to walk an additional 40 feet (12 m).[648]
  • Erroneously shown on neighborhood maps until 2015[650][651]
  • First flights boarded up, second flights removed[652][653]
  • Not accounted for in official MTA FOIL.
c. 1996[654] (still open) 3,402,610 151 2 No; planned
46th Street–Bliss Street A (IRT) Flushing Line Queens Eastern corners of 47th Street and median of Queens Boulevard (2); stairs S1 and S2[146][655][146]
  • First staircase flights walled off; second flight removed[656]
  • Intended to improve customer security by concentrating riders at two street stairs.[655]
  • Half of the riders at the control area had to walk an additional 40 feet (12 m).[655]
  • Erroneously shown on neighborhood maps until 2015[657]
(still open) 4,303,987 117 2 No; planned
63rd Drive—Rego Park station B (IND) Queens Boulevard Line Queens Southern side of Queens Boulevard east of 63rd Drive (1), Stair S3[658]
  • Replaced by easement entrance at the same location on February 11, 1962
  • Slabbed over
February 11, 1962 No
65th Street B (IND) Queens Boulevard Line Queens Southwestern corner of 63rd Street and Broadway (1)[659]
  • Eastbound only.
  • Slabbed over under the front yard of a private home;[660] used for employee facilities for the Station Department.
  • Entrance did not have globes or signage in 1940; may have never opened.
1933-1940[661] N321 1,120,703 339 1 No
Southeastern corner of 63rd Street and 35th Avenue (1)[118][659]
  • Manhattan-bound only.
  • Sealed & used for employee facilities/"infrastructure".[662]
1933-1980[663] N320
Briarwood B (IND) Queens Boulevard Line Queens South side of Queens Boulevard between two legs of Main Street, Stair S4 (1)[664]
  • Located opposite the open entrance on the north side of Queens Boulevard.
  • Public hearing was held on April 4, 2011[665][666]
    • Entrance removed to accommodate the widening of the Van Wyck Expressway[666]
    • Replaced by entrance on the west side of the Van Wyck Expressway[666]
August 2012[667] 1,489,396 304 No; planned
West side of the Van Wyck Expressway service road, just south of Queens Boulevard, Stair S3 (1)[668]
  • Used as an emergency exit.
  • Leads into space used for Police Precinct 20
Before 1996[669]
East side of the Van Wyck Expressway service road south of Queens Boulevard, Stair S2 (1)
  • Slabbed over following the construction of the Van Wyck Expressway.
  • Located on opposite side of service road from open stair S1.
1950s
Broad Channel

B (IND)

Rockaway Line Queens East side of West Road at East 6th Road After 1956 No
Court Square–

23rd Street

B (IND)

A (IRT)

Crosstown Line

Queens Boulevard Line

Flushing Line

Queens Southeastern corner of Court Square West and Jackson Avenue (1)[672]
  • In Court Square Park[673]
  • Reused for employee facilities and slabbed over
N/A 7,003,218 59 Partially (IRT only; Crosstown Line in design, Manhattan-bound Queens Boulevard Line platform in progress)
Southwestern corner of Pearson Street and Jackson Avenue (1)[672][674]
  • Reused for employee facilities and slabbed over
  • Entrance structure still existed in 1940, but signage and globes were removed.[675]
  • Unclear if ever open
1933-1940
Elmhurst Avenue station B (IND) Queens Boulevard Line Queens Northwestern corner of Broadway and Elmhurst Avenue (1), Stair S2[676]
  • Replaced by easement entrance at the same corner
  • Slabbed over
No
Flushing–

Main Street

A (IRT) Flushing Line Queens North and south side of Roosevelt Avenue between Main Street and Lippman Plaza[677] (3)
  • Replaced in 1990s renovation project; now houses HVAC equipment for a new employee facility[678]
1996-1999 18,746,832 10 Yes
Hunters Point Avenue Southeastern corner of 49th Avenue and 21st Street (1)[43]
  • Slabbed over; used for storage[679]
c. 1982[43] 1,999,970 245 No
Kew Gardens–Union Turnpike B (IND) Queens Boulevard Line Queens

Western and eastern sides of Union Turnpike under Queens Boulevard (2)

  • No street stairs
  • Kiss and ride
  • Meeting on proposed closure was held in September 1985 due to the reconstruction of the Interboro Parkway; already closed for a year prior[680][681]
c. 1984 7,811,007 46 Yes
Northern Boulevard B (IND) Queens Boulevard Line Queens Eastern corners of 56th Street and Broadway, Stairs S1 and S2 (2)[682][683]
  • In 1935, the Woodside, Queens Social Club urged the Board of Transportation to open these entrances.[684]
  • In 1945, Woodside, Queens residents appealed to the Board of Transportation to open these entrances; their petition was denied because the station only had 6,000 daily riders. Residents argued that the entrances should be open because many women had to walk through "a lonely section" to get home at night.[685]
  • Used for employee facilities
  • Northeastern exit area being repurposed for CBTC equipment room[686]
  • Northeastern exit has an access hatch[687]
  • Entrance structure for the southeastern exit still in place in the mid-1980s, but without signage and globes; had an older-style entrance structure[682]
  • Southeastern exit used as an air vent[688]; space used by Station Department
1965[279]-1980s[689] N318A (NB)

N319A (SB)

2,140,551 231 1 No; planned
Woodhaven Boulevard Slattery Plaza, south side of Queens Blvd under Long Island Expressway overpass (westbound only) (1), Stair S1[690]
  • Booth closed by 1980
  • Covered with a grate[691]
  • Used as an electrical room/station storage[692]
1991 (emergency)[693]
1993[694]
6,871,409 63 No; planned
Northeastern corner of Horace Harding Expressway eastern service road and Queens Boulevard (1)[695]
  • Entrance removed with the construction of the Long Island Expressway
1954[696]-1960[697]
149th Street–

Grand Concourse

A (IRT) Jerome Avenue Line

White Plains Road Line

The Bronx Elevator entrance to southwestern corner of 149th Street and Grand Concourse (1)[698]
  • Street level removed by 1918;[699] likely replaced with level to mezzanine above Jerome Avenue Line platforms.
  • Not accounted for in official MTA FOIL.
  • Currently being reopened.[700][701]
after August 1978[702] 4,255,015 119 No;

In design

167th Street B (IND) Concourse Line The Bronx Entire walkway on the underpass at 167th Street and Grand Concourse and the northern/southern free zone staircases to the upper station mezzanine, Stair S7, S8, S13, and S14 (4)[703]
  • Closed for safety reasons; gated off on both ends[704][705]
after August 1992[128] XN207 3,293,451 155 2 No; planned
Underpass platforms at 167th Street and Grand Concourse, Stair S9, S10, S11, and S12 (4)[706]
  • Led to trolley platforms, later used by the Bx35 until 1990.
  • Platforms abandoned, but structures remain intact.
  • All northern/southern staircases to the lower level mezzanine (adjacent to the station platforms on both sides) were gated off.[707][708][709][710]
c. 1990
170th Street North and south sides of underpass at 170th Street, under Grand Concourse (2)[711][712][713]
  • Not accounted for in official MTA FOIL.
c. 1992[138] (still open) 2,270,027 217 No
174th-175th Streets South side of 175th Street and Morris Avenue under Grand Concourse (1)[714]
  • Change booth removed in the 1950s, and reopened after local residents protested, then closed again in 1957; entrance reopened via the installation of a high entry turnstile.[715][716]
  • Entrance opened in 2018 temporarily so debris could be removed during a station renovation.
1984-1990s N211[146] 1,735,321 273 No
West side of Grand Concourse over 174th Street (1) 1980s N210A[146]
182nd-183rd Streets East and west sides of Grand Concourse near Anthony Avenue, stairs S1 and S2 (2)[717][718][719]
  • Slabbed over
  • Closed at the request of the community due to safety concerns and low usage
  • Were exit only with red globes
  • West side entrance structure still in place, but closed with advertising intact in 1994
  • Had two HXTs[720]
July 1989[488] to 1993[721] N215A[146] 1,577,144 292 1 No
All corners of 183rd Street and Grand Concourse (4), stairs S7, S8, S9 and S10 [717][722][723][724][725]
  • Northeastern and northwestern corner exit structures still in place in mid-1980s, with advertising intact[726][727]
  • Southeastern exit structure still in place in 1993, but already closed, with red globe, advertisements removed.
  • All entrances removed and slabbed over by 1996[728]
  • Accessed by HEETs[720]
  • Closed booth still in place
  • Sealed[729][730][731]
1983-1993[732] N216[146]
East 180th Street A (IRT) White Plains Road Line The Bronx North side of East 180th Street between Bronx Park Avenue and Morris Park Avenue
  • Mezzanine with escalators removed in the 1980s[733]
1980s Yes
Fordham Road B (IND) Concourse Line The Bronx Western corners of Fordham Road and Grand Concourse, in front of 148 East Fordham Road (southwestern) and Alexander's store (now P.C. Richard & Son) (northwestern); stairs S5 and S7 (2)[55][734]
  • First proposed to MTA Board in December 1988
  • Some riders wanted the entrances reopened as they would have been safer and more convenient for shoppers going to the Fordham stores.[735]
  • Slabbed over[736][737]
April 1991 (emergency)[738]
c. 1992
N219 3,843,008 132 2 No
Kingsbridge Road Southern side of underpass at Kingsbridge Road, under Grand Concourse (1)[739]
  • Entire walkway sealed off on July 10, 2020.[740]
1980s
c. 1992 (permanently)[138]
2,589,970 197 2 Yes
Southern corners of Kingsbridge Road and Grand Concourse, Stair S1 and S2 (2)[741][742][743]
  • Stair to southeastern corner blocked by elevator machine room.
Middle of both directional roadways in Kingsbridge Road underpass (2)[744]
  • May have never opened - either provisions to never-built trolley platforms or closed after trolley platforms were demolished.
  • Slabbed over.
N/A
Morris Park A (IRT) Dyre Avenue Line The Bronx

Northern side of Colden Avenue (1)[745]:15

  • Accounted for in official MTA FOIL only as a transfer passageway, not as an entrance.[146]
  • Used to be at the southern end of the station platform[746][747]
  • May have been closed with the NYW&B in 1937, or when the platforms were extended in 1969
  • Bricked over entrance[748]
  • Entrance slabbed over with concrete in 1970[749]
  • Used to have a waiting room
Before 1970[750] R725 685,577 389 1 No
Paulding Avenue (northbound only) (1)[745]:4
  • At the southeastern corner of the station house
Before 1998
Third Avenue–138th Street A (IRT) Pelham Line The Bronx Northeastern corner of Lincoln Avenue and 138th Street (1)
  • Removed and slabbed at request of an adjacent property owner, which paid the cost of the removal, and would bear the obligation of restoring the entrance when it was deemed necessary by the Board of Transportation
  • Used as a storage room.[751]
1952[752] 2,515,479 200 No
Third Avenue–149th Street A (IRT) White Plains Road Line The Bronx Northwestern corner of 149th Street and Melrose Avenue west of the current staircase (1)
  • Occupied by a communications room
  • Slabbed over
N/A 7,458,222 52 1 Yes

Closed easement entrances[edit]

Station Division Line Borough Location Date closed Control area Ridership (2017)[175] Ridership rank out of 425 (2017)[175] Number of exit points ADA Accessible?
Borough Hall/Court Street A (IRT)

B (BMT)

Eastern Parkway Line

Fourth Avenue Line

Brooklyn Northwestern corner of Cadman Plaza West and Montague Street (1)
  • Entrance within bank building
  • Located within passage between IRT 7th Avenue platforms and BMT station.[146]
After 1985[753] 10,693,598 28 Partially (Eastern Parkway local & northbound express only); southbound downtown Eastern Parkway express planned
Second and third staircases to the southwestern corner of Joralemon Street and Court Street (2)[146][754][755]:16
  • Blocked by a door in a passageway leading to the open staircase to the intersection.
  • The staircase facing southward has been demolished
N/A
Brooklyn Municipal Building (2)
  • Lexington Avenue platform
February 13, 1996[756]
DeKalb Avenue B (BMT) Fourth Avenue Line
Brighton Line
Brooklyn 340 Flatbush Avenue Extension, west side of Flatbush Avenue (1)[260][146]
  • Easement dates to 1920[757]
  • Temporarily reopened in 2003 during the first stage of the station's renovation[113]
  • Mezzanine area around entrance converted to DeKalb Avenue Tower; entrance currently used for employee access.
    • Small portion of accompanying mezzanine kept open to allow passengers to crossover between platforms[758][759]
  • The owner of the property, which is building the new 9 DeKalb Avenue skyscraper on the property agreed to construct new entrances on the east side of Flatbush Avenue at its cost to get the MTA to surrender its interest in the leased space and its right to reopen the entrance[757]
  • NYCT Operations Planning deemed that it would cost $1.6 million to reopen the entrance, and that it would not be worth doing given that the entrance is located between two open entrances. It deemed that constructing the new entrances on the opposite side of Flatbush Avenue would be worth doing as it would be directly in front of the main building of Long Island University, and as it would relieve crowding at the station's southern entrance, and improve the distribution of riders along the platform. The cost of the new entrances, borne by the property owner, would be $14 million.[757]
  • In May 2016, the MTA Board voted to surrender the lease and the closed entrance to be effective when new space for Traffic Checking Operations, which used the lease, would be completed.[757]
    • Building housing the exit demolished in 2019, but entrance structure was maintained.[760]
1980s[757]

2003

C007 Yes
Hoyt–Schermerhorn Streets B (IND) Crosstown Line

Fulton Street Line

Brooklyn Passageway from the Bond Street exit to southeastern corner of Bond Street and Livingston Street, to now-defunct Loeser's Department Store (2) April 1991 (Emergency) 1992 (Permanently) 3,264,293 157 No; planned
Hoyt Street A (IRT) Eastern Parkway Line Brooklyn Macy's (former Abraham and Strauss Store) (422 Fulton Street) (1 passage) 1983[44][118] 2,137,478 232 No
Martin's Department store (501 Fulton Street) (1)[761]
  • From Manhattan-bound platform
  • Installed in 1923[762]
  • Display windows from the store led onto the subway platform[763]
After 1938[764]
Sheepshead Bay B (BMT) Brighton Line Brooklyn Passage behind the full-time booth to a restaurant and a small arcade of stores (1 passage)
  • Closed in a station renovation and sealed[113]
1998 4,297,325 118 2 No; planned
14th Street–Union Square A (IRT)

B (BMT)

Lexington Avenue Line
Broadway Line
Canarsie Line
Manhattan Southwestern corner of 14th Street and Broadway to 853 Broadway (1)[146][765]:18[766][767][768]
  • "Along western frontage of Broadway"
c. 1995 34,557,551 Partially (Except IRT)
23rd Street A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan 303 Park Avenue South building lobby (northeastern corner of 23rd Street and Park Avenue South); stair O4.
  • Sealed with wall in building lobby end.
  • Blocked by elevator machine room in station end.
N/A 8,265,227 42 2 Yes
304 Park Avenue South basement and second stairway to southwestern corner of 23rd Street and Park Avenue South[769]:29, 31[770]
  • A passageway stretched 165 feet (50 m) west under the southern sidewalk of 23rd Street.[769]:31
  • The passageway, if it still exists, was walled over. A broad staircase leading to the passageway still exists and is used for the street entrance on the south side of 23rd Street.
N/A
33rd Street A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan West side of Park Avenue between 33rd Street and 32nd Street, into 2 Park Avenue (2)[212]:71[771]
  • Blocked off by metal door
N/A 8,916,102 35 2 No
34th Street–Herald Square B (BMT/IND) Broadway Line
Sixth Avenue Line
Manhattan Macy's Herald Square
  • Branches off of stair to northwestern corner of 34th Street and Broadway.
  • May have been replaced with a Burger King restaurant.
c. 1970s[772] 39,672,507 3 Yes
Northeastern corner of 32nd Street and Sixth Avenue to 1270 Broadway.[169] N/A
Korvette's (later Modell's (1)[414] N/A
42nd Street–Bryant Park/Fifth Avenue A (IRT)
B (IND)
Flushing Line

Sixth Avenue Line

Manhattan Passage to 1114 Sixth Avenue WR Grace Chemical building (formerly Stern's Department Store)[773], with street stair on the north side of 42nd Street between Fifth Avenue and Sixth Avenue; stairs O1 and O2 (1)
  • Erroneously shown on 2015 neighborhood map[774][775]
  • Blocked by a gate at street level and used for storage.[776]
  • Mezzanine stairs (M4A, M4B)
  • Part of passage may be reopened with two new street entrances.[777]
Before 2004[169]:S.4–139 R500 16,594,289 14 4 No; planned
125th Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan 285 St. Nicholas Avenue, West side of St. Nicholas Avenue between 125th Street and 124th Street (1), stair O1
  • Built into building.
  • Barricaded and closed;[778] eventually bricked over.[779]
1940 XN026 9,335,382 32 2 Yes
Astor Place A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan Clinton Hall (former Mercantile Library) (southbound only) (1) 1940s[780] 5,245,449 89 1 No
Brooklyn Bridge–City Hall/Chambers Street A (IRT)

B (BMT)

Lexington Avenue Line

Nassau Street Line

Manhattan Eastern side of Centre Street opposite Duane Street to the US Federal Courthouse (1)[146]
  • Entrance blocked by room[518]
N/A 9,360,484 31 Yes
Chambers Street–World Trade Center/Park Place/Cortlandt Street A (IRT)/

B (IND/BMT)

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line

Eighth Avenue Line

Broadway Line

Manhattan Passageway to the Woolworth Building, at southwestern corner of Broadway and Park Place (1)[781] After September 11, 2001 16,079,624 16 Partially

(World Trade Center and Cortlandt Street only)

Passageway to basement of Woolworth Building (1)[781] N/A
Passage to 99 Church Street (1 passage)[782][783] After 1963[784]
Basement of 99 Church Street (1 passage)
City Hall B (BMT) Broadway Line Manhattan Passageway to the Woolworth Building (1)[146][212]:123[785] 1982 old A049 2,258,254 220 1 No
Fulton Street A (IRT)

B (IND/BMT)

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line Lexington Avenue Line

Eighth Avenue Line

Nassau Street Line

Manhattan Northwestern corner of Broadway and Dey Street inside 195 Broadway (IRT only) (1)[788]
  • Entrance built pursuant to a lease from August 23, 1915
  • Led directly to the downtown 4 5 platform
  • Had a pair of HEETs
  • The construction of an escalator as part of the Fulton Center blocked the entrance, and a new entrance was built at the southwestern corner of the intersection. After the property owner requested that the easement be extinguished, the MTA voted to do so iin June 2016.[789]
May 1, 2012[790]:2 26,838,473 5 Yes
Northeastern corner of Broadway and Fulton Street inside 222 Broadway (1)[791]
  • Closed due to the construction of the Fulton Center
October 29, 2011[792]
Grand Central–42nd Street A (IRT) 42nd Street Shuttle

Flushing Line
Lexington Avenue Line

Manhattan 315 Madison Avenue, at the southeastern corner of Madison Avenue and 42nd Street (1)
  • Installed in 1918[793]
  • Blocked by a door at street level.[794]
c. March 1988[125] R234 44,928,488 2 Partially

(Except 42nd Street Shuttle, in progress)

Pershing Building, at the north side of 41st Street between Park Avenue South and Lexington Avenue (1)[795] Before 1991
Lincoln Building, on the north side of 41st Street between Madison Avenue and Park Avenue South (1)
  • Constructed along with the building in November 1929.[796][797]
1958[798]- 1991[795]
Lincoln Building, on the east side of Madison Avenue between 41st Street and 42nd Street (1)[795] Before 1991
Passage to the Socony–Mobil Building [795], with street stair on the south side of 42nd Street between Lexington Avenue and Third Avenue (1)
  • Recommended for reopening by New York City Department of City Planning in 1991.[795]
  • Partially reopened with new street entrances to the southeastern corner of 42nd Street and Lexington Avenue in December 2017; remainder of passage remains closed.
Before 1991
Passage to Graybar Building on the west side of Lexington Avenue and 43rd Street (1)[799]
  • 120 feet (37 m)-long passageway branched off of Chrysler Passageway[800]
  • Recommended for closure by the New York City Department of City Planning in 1991.[795]
  • Closed by the NYCTA on March 29, 1991 along with 14 of the other most dangerous passageways after a women was raped the previous week in a passageway connecting 34th Street and 42nd Street. Originally, it was closed by emergency order, with a public hearing was held afterwards.[60][801][59]
  • 365 felonies were committed in the passageway since January 1, 1990, making it the most dangerous of the 15 closed.[801]
  • The passageway was behind a token booth, making it hard to patrol[801]
  • Closure finalized in 1992.[802]
1991

1992 (Permanent)

Inwood–

207th Street

B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line Manhattan Northwestern corner of 207th Street and Broadway located inside a building (1)[803]
  • Closed after being severely damaged after a fire. Permanent closure approved by MTA Board in June 1994, after having been closed for several years[804]
  • Possibly replaced by elevator on northwestern corner.
late 1980s/early 1990s? 2,954,523 174 Yes
Lexington Avenue/51st Street A (IRT)
B (IND)
Lexington Avenue Line
Queens Boulevard Line
Manhattan Basement of 570 Lexington Avenue, southwestern corner of 51st Street and Lexington Avenue (1)
  • Built in 1931, replacing a street staircase at the same corner.[805]
  • At some point, the opening to the IRT station was closed and sealed with a marble-clad wall.[806]
  • Replaced with a new entrance at the same corner[258]
1965 18,940,774 10 1 Yes
Lexington Avenue/59th Street A (IRT)
B (BMT)
Lexington Avenue Line
Broadway Line
Manhattan 731 Lexington Avenue, east side of Lexington Avenue between 58th Street and 59th Street (1)
  • May be fare control area R245B
  • Used for Div. Station Access
N/A 17,888,188 11 3 No
Rector Street A (IRT) Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line Manhattan Southwestern corner of Rector Street and Greenwich Street, into 19 Rector Street (1)
  • From basement of building
  • Opened in 1931[807]
1931-1941[808] No
Rector Street B (BMT) Broadway Line Manhattan Basement of American Express Building; uptown only (1) Before 1967 2,213,971 226 No; Downtown in progress
South Ferry A (IRT)

B (BMT)

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line

Broadway Line

Manhattan Inside of Staten Island Ferry Terminal (1)
  • Opened in 2005 with the opening of the new ferry terminal, connected to the rebuilt original entrance[487]
  • Closed with opening of new station and removed.
March 2009 10,205,836 29 Partially

(IRT only)

Times Square–42nd Street/

Port Authority Bus Terminal

A (IRT)
B (BMT/IND)
42nd Street Shuttle

Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line
Flushing Line
Broadway Line
Eighth Avenue Line

Manhattan Knickerbocker Hotel, southeastern corner of Broadway and 42nd Street[812][813] (1 or 2) N/A 64,815,739 1 Partially (except 42nd Street Shuttle, in progress)
Wall Street A (IRT) Lexington Avenue Line Manhattan To 57-61 Broadway (1), west side of Broadway, stair O1, P1A/B[814]
  • From downtown platform
  • Built in 1915 as part of a new building[815]
  • Used for an employee locker room for the Department of Maintenance and a refuse room
  • Passageway from the end of the platform had one HEET
After 1944[816] 5,704,122 78 2 No
65 Broadway, American Express Building (1)[817][818][819]
  • From downtown platform
N/A
1 Wall Street, to the west side of New Street between Wall Street and Exchange Place (1)[765]:5–6
  • From the Uptown platform
  • Opened in March 1931[820]
  • Used as a communications room[821]
After 1931
Basement of 1 Wall Street[765]:5–6
  • From the Uptown platform
  • Opened in March 1931[820]
  • Used as a communications room[821]
Northwestern corner of Thames Street and Broadway, to 115 Broadway, stair O9 (1)
  • Stairway repurposed for an entrance into a copy center[822]
  • Blocked by employee rooms for the Department of Maintenance
After 1947[823]
Flushing–

Main Street

A (IRT) Flushing Line Queens Basement of Duane Reade (former Woolworth's) at northeastern corner of Main Street and Roosevelt Avenue (1 passage)
(may be missing one more)
N/A 18,746,832 10 Yes
Brook Avenue A (IRT) Pelham Line Bronx Basement of 511 East 138th Street at the northeastern corner of 138th Street and Brook Avenue (1 passage)[146] N/A No


Removed entrances[edit]

Station Division Line Borough Location Date closed Control area Ridership (2017)[175] Ridership rank out of 425 (2017)[175] Number of exit points ADA Accessible?
Atlantic Avenue–Barclays Center A
B (BMT)
Eastern Parkway Line
Fourth Avenue Line
Brooklyn Former IRT headhouse at triangular island formed by Flatbush Avenue, Fourth Avenue, and Atlantic Avenue triangle[824][825]
  • Led to southbound local platform.
  • Stairs to headhouse demolished and headhouse repurposed into skylight during station complex renovation.
1980s Yes
Northeastern corner of Atlantic Avenue and Fourth Avenue (BMT only); stair S6.[824][825]
  • Demolished during station complex renovation.
c. 1982
25th Avenue B (BMT) West End Line Brooklyn Bay 41st Street and 86th Street (2)[364]:625
  • Steel structure visible in 1940 and 1957, removed at an earlier date
  • There was one staircase from each platform
  • In 1963, the railings on the staircases still existed, but they were covered and boarded up, and blocked off.[826][827][828][829]
  • One level of the staircase existed below the elevated structure, though not all the way to the street.[830][831]
1916-1940[832] 1,789,365 265 No
Avenue P B (IND) Culver Line Brooklyn Southeastern corner of Avenue P and McDonald Avenue (1)[833]
  • Removed before 1947[834][835]
  • Space in mezzanine used for Normal EDR and Communications Room
Before 1947[834][835] 534,727[b] 405 1 No
Avenue X South end of the platforms to Avenue Y and Shell Road (2)
  • Closed before 1950[836]
  • In 1950, the bottom portion of the entrance was removed.[836][837]
  • The entrance was fully removed by 1957, when only the steel structure was visible.
Before 1950 738,274 386 No
Bay 50th Street B (BMT) West End Line Brooklyn Southern corners of Bay 49th Street[838] and Stillwell Avenue (2)[364]:625
  • Steel structure visible in 1957, removed at an earlier date
  • In 1963, signage pointing to the exit was still located on the platforms[839][840]
  • Steel frame of mezzanine and stairs to mezzanine from platforms still in place in 1970[841][842][843]
  • Platform staircases boarded over/entrance structure removed by 1970[844]
  • Evidence of mezzanine from below elevated structure, between columns D445A and D446A[845][846]
Before 1957 900,508 371 No
Broadway Junction B (BMT/IND) Jamaica Line

Canarsie Line Fulton Street Line

Brooklyn Both northern corners of Conway Street and Broadway (2)[847][848][849]
  • Removed in the early 2000s as part of a station renovation project[850]:50[851]
  • Used for Signal Office, Conference Room, Offices, Station Manager's Office
Before 2000 H034 2,911,532 179 No; planned
Central Avenue B (BMT) Myrtle Avenue Line Brooklyn Western corners of Hart Street and Myrtle Avenue (2)
  • Entrance and mezzanine structures still open in the mid-1980s[852][853][854]
  • Southern mezzanine and staircases removed by 1996.[855]
After mid-1980s K016 539,681[b] 404 1 No
Cypress Hills B (BMT) Jamaica Line Brooklyn North side of Jamaica Avenue east of Autumn Avenue (1); Stair S2[856][857][858]
  • Manhattan-bound only[146]
  • Mezzanine closed; entrance to the south side of the street is still open, but is exit-only
  • Some electrical panels are in the closed mezzanine
  • Stair to the street removed
c. March 1988[125] J026 435,855 410 No
Fort Hamilton Parkway B (IND) Culver Line Brooklyn Entrances to Fort Hamilton Parkway
  • Removed for Prospect Expressway and replaced by a ramp
N/A 1,786,458 267 No
Franklin Avenue/

Botanic Garden

B (BMT) Franklin Avenue Line Brooklyn President Street, west of Franklin Avenue (1)
  • Headhouse removed after 1980.[859]
  • Closed entrance and abandoned portion of shuttle platform removed in 1998 renovation of the shuttle.[860][861]
1975[862]-1980 B011 4,762,184 103 No
Franklin Avenue–Fulton Street B (BMT/IND) Franklin Avenue Line

Fulton Street Line

Brooklyn Southwestern corner of Franklin Avenue and Fulton Street (2)
  • Removed during renovation of the shuttle.
  • One lead to subway, one lead to shuttle station
1998 2,058,258 239 Yes
Northwestern corner of Franklin Avenue and Fulton Street (2)
  • Removed during renovation of the shuttle.
  • One lead to subway, one lead to shuttle station
Jay Street–MetroTech B (IND) Fulton Street Line
Culver Line
Brooklyn West side of Jay Street at Myrtle Promenade. (still open) Yes
Knickerbocker Avenue B (BMT) Myrtle Avenue Line Brooklyn Western corners of Harriman Street and Myrtle Avenue (2)[863]
  • Entrances still open in 1969.
  • Signage still showed the entrances as open in 1972.[864]
  • Entrance structures still in place in the mid-1980s;[865][866] eventually removed by 1996.[867]
1969-1980s K018 593,366[b] 399 1 No
Myrtle Avenue B (BMT) Jamaica Line Brooklyn Northwestern corner of Jefferson Street and Broadway (1), Stair S3[868][869]
  • Stair present in 1996-1997, likely removed after renovation;[870] closed mezzanine repurposed as employee space.
  • May be reopened.[871]
c. March 1988[125] J010 No; planned
Park Place B (BMT) Franklin Avenue Line Brooklyn South side of Park Place (1)
  • Headhouse and staircases removed during 1998 renovation of the shuttle[872]
1998 Yes
West Eighth Street–New York Aquarium B (BMT/IND) Brighton Line

Culver Line

Brooklyn Pedestrian bridge over Surf Avenue to New York Aquarium parking lot August 8, 2013 789,104 383 No
96th Street A (IRT) Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line Manhattan Both southern corners of 96th Street and Broadway, stairs S3 & S4 (2)
  • From old side platforms
  • Closed when new station house opened;[876] replaced with hatches via ladders.
April 5, 2010 11,948,981 25 Yes
116th Street–Columbia University A (IRT) Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line Manhattan Median of Broadway north of 116th Street
  • The exit may have actually been closed in 1967. The Real Estate Record and Guide reported on January 6, 1968, that the control house had been demolished.[877]:1332
1968[877]:1122 4,380,469 112 No
155th Street–Eighth Avenue B (IND) Concourse Line Manhattan North side of 155th Street west of Bradhurst Avenue N/A N201 1,212,240 330 1 No
Canal Street B (BMT)

A (IRT)

Broadway Line

Nassau Street Line

Lexington Avenue Line

Manhattan Northwestern corner of Canal Street and Centre Street (1)[878]
  • Demolished between 1979 and 1980
Before 1979 16,285,516 15 Partially (IRT only)
Chambers Street–World Trade Center/Park Place/Cortlandt Street B (IND) Eighth Avenue Line
Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line
Broadway Line
Manhattan Hudson Terminal
  • Removed with its replacement by the World Trade Center
1973 14,825,863 17 Partially (World Trade Center and Cortlandt Street only)
World Trade Center's lower concourse to the BMT platforms
  • Destroyed in September 11, 2001 Attacks
2001
WTC Cortlandt A (IRT) Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line Manhattan Liberty Street through 4 World Trade Center[879]
  • Destroyed in September 11, 2001 Attacks
2001 0[c] 425 Yes
World Trade Center concourse
  • Consisted of full height turnstiles at the center of each platform and was only open on weekdays between 6:40 a.m. and 10 p.m.[880][d]
  • Destroyed in September 11, 2001 Attacks

Vesey Street and West Broadway (former southeastern corner)[882]
  • Former full-time entrance
  • There was a turnstile bank and one full height turnstile.[883][884]
  • The token booth was intact until the last remnants of the station in 2007.[885][886]
75th Street–Elderts Lane B (BMT) Jamaica Line Queens Western corners of Elderts Lane and Jamaica Avenue (2)[887]
  • In the late 1980s, the mezzanine was closed, but since it had become a haven to drugs and prostitution, these entrances were removed.Cite error: The <ref> tag name cannot be a simple integer (see the help page).

  • When it was found that people were still getting into the closed mezzanine, the entire mezzanine was dismantled.
  • The entrance had a token booth, which was closed due to vandalism for several months, as of April 1987.[888]
  • Booth had been open between 5:50 a.m. and 9:00 a.m. and from 1:40 to 4:30 p.m. HEETs were open between 5:50 a.m. and 11:30 p.m..
  • Had 300 entries and 10 exits in the morning, and 50 entries and 150 exits in the afternoon
  • In 1987, the MTA Board approved the closure of the exit and the removal of the mezzanine. NYCTA decided to remove the mezzanine to control crime and save it the expense of upkeep.
  • On February 20, 1988, it was reported that the mezzanine would be removed.[889]
  • Erroneously shown on 2015 neighborhood map[890]
c. 1988 J027 1,069,608 346 No
85th Street–Forest Parkway Northwestern corner of Forest Parkway and Jamaica Avenue (1)[891][892]
  • At the time of its closure, the entrance had HET and HXTs, was open between 4:40 a.m. to 11:30 p.m., and was entered by 70 daily riders.Cite error: The <ref> tag name cannot be a simple integer (see the help page).

[888]

  • In 1987, the MTA Board approved the closure of the exit and the removal of the mezzanine. NYCTA decided to remove the mezzanine to control crime and save it the expense of upkeep.
  • On February 20, 1988, it was reported that the mezzanine would be removed.[889]
c. 1988 J029 1,156,600 336 No
88th Street B (IND) Fulton Street Line Queens Both western corners of Liberty Avenue and 86th Street (2)[275]
  • Street staircases removed; mezzanine still exists[893]
  • Turnstile array still intact[894]
  • Not used for storage
  • Removed after 1971[895][896]
1971-1980[897] N132 880,776 375 1 No
104th Street B (BMT) Jamaica Line Queens Eastern corners of 102nd Street and Jamaica Avenue (2)[170][898][899][900]
  • At the time of its closure, it was exit-only and was open between 5:30 a.m. and 11:30 p.m.[888]Cite error: The <ref> tag name cannot be a simple integer (see the help page).

  • In 1987, the MTA Board approved the closure of the exit and the removal of the mezzanine. NYCTA decided to remove the mezzanine to control crime and save it the expense of upkeep.
  • On February 20, 1988, it was reported that the mezzanine would be removed.[889]
  • Had two HXTs
c. 1988 J033 502,541[b] 406 No
111th Street A (IRT) Flushing Line Queens Northwestern, Southwestern and Southeastern corners of 112th Street and Roosevelt Avenue (3)[901][902]
  • Stairways to street removed[903]
  • Some platform to mezzanine staircases were slabbed over[904]
  • Removed after 1971 and before 2003.[905][906]
After 1971 R531[146] 3,721,445 137 1 No
111th Street B (IND) Jamaica Line Queens Southeastern corner of 113th Street and Jamaica Avenue (1), Stair S1
  • Stairway to street removed[907]
  • Mezzanine area repurposed into employee space as Crew Quarters Locker Room.[908]
  • Signage in 1975 still points to the entrance[909]
  • Entrance structure still in place in mid-1980s; unclear if still open[910]
After 1969[911] J036 948,885 368 1 No
Beach 90th Street B (IND) Rockaway Line Queens Northwestern corner of Beach 87th Street and Rockaway Freeway.[118][912]
  • Southbound only
  • Boarded up by July 1956
  • Still in place in 1966[913]
  • Structure removed by 1980[914]
By July 1956[915] 411,887 411 No
Northwestern corner of Beach 90th Street and Rockaway Freeway (1)[146][916] 1980s?
Beach 98th Street Northwestern corner of Beach 97th Street and Rockaway Freeway (1)[118][146][920][921]
  • Southbound only
  • Still in place in 1980,[922] but gated off in the mid-1980s[923]
1980s or earlier 180,588 422 No
Northeastern corner of Beach 101st Street and Rockaway Freeway (1)[146]
  • Southbound only.
  • Still in place in 1980[924]; removed by mid-1980s[925]
Beach 105th Street Northwestern corner of Rockaway Freeway and Beach 105th Street (1)[118][146]
  • Southbound only
  • Still in place in 1980.[926]
  • The entrance structure, which already had its canopy removed by this point, was still in place in 2007.[927]
  • Removed as part of a station renovation project in 2010-2011.[928]
  • Given that the passageway to the platform is only 9 feet wide, and that the platform is narrow at this location, this entrance was likely only used for exits, or has not been open since the station was used by the Long Island Rail Road
1980s 97,654 423 No
North side of Rockaway Freeway between Beach 105th Street and Beach 106th Street (1)
  • Removed as part of a station renovation project[929]
2010-2011
Forest Avenue B (BMT) Myrtle Avenue Line Queens East and west sides of Madison Street north of Woodward Avenue (2)[146][930]
  • Entrance structures and mezzanine still in place in the mid-1980s[931]; eventually removed
    • Local residents called for the removal of the staircases in 1981[932]
After 1965[279] K023 796,742[b] 381 1 No
Howard Beach–JFK Airport B (BMT) Rockaway Line Queens Passageway to bus terminal (1)[146][933][934]
  • Removed following the opening of the AirTrain station
2003 Yes
Mets–Willets Point A (IRT) Flushing Line Queens Northwestern corner of Willets Point Boulevard and Roosevelt Avenue; stairway to street removed (1)[935]
  • Not accounted for in official MTA FOIL.
  • Closed after station was shifted west in 1939 to become an express stop for the World's Fair
1939 1,873,789 259 No
Vernon Boulevard–Jackson Avenue A (IRT) Flushing Line Queens 10-27 50th Avenue, south side of 50th Avenue between Jackson Avenue and Vernon Boulevard (1)
  • Closed following the extension of the station platforms to 10-cars and the opening of an entrance at Vernon Boulevard and 50th Street.[936][937]
  • Slabbed over in 1927 in an agreement with Junee Holding Company[938][939]
  • Replaced by entrances at either end of station
  • In May 2020, the MTA Board voted to approve the surrendering of the master lease to the upper portion of the easement at ground level, and to relocate the lower portion of the easement to a location adjacent to the platform for a storage room. The access to the easement will be permanently blocked off by a developer.[940]
1926 4,821,191 100 2 No; planned
Bronx Park East A (IRT) White Plains Road Line The Bronx Southwestern corner of Sagamore Street and Birchall Avenue (1)[146][941]
  • Staircase still existed in mid-1980s[942]
  • Space used for an Electric Panel Room
before 1996[943] 799,927 379 No

Previously unopened entrances[edit]

Station Division Line Borough Location Date Station Opened Date Opened Reason for Reopening
Bergen Street B (IND) Culver Line Brooklyn Warren Street and Smith Street March 20, 1933 After July 1933[944]
Fort Hamilton Parkway Brooklyn Southeastern corner of Reeve Place and Prospect Avenue October 7, 1933
Northwestern corner of Fort Hamilton Parkway and Prospect Expressway October 1962 Entrance did not open with the rest of the station, and was partially demolished as part f the construction of the Prospect Expressway. It was decided to rebuild it and open it following a TA poll that found that 73% off nearby residents questioned favored opening the entrance.[945] The survey, which was issued in March 1962, was done at the request of local residents who claimed that the opening of the highway made the opening of the entrance necessary.[946]
Franklin Avenue B (IND) Fulton Street Line Brooklyn Eastern corners of Classon Avenue and Fulton Street (2) April 9, 1936
Nassau Avenue B (IND) Crosstown Line Brooklyn Northern corners of Norman Avenue and Manhattan Avenue August 19, 1933 After August 1936[947]
Nostrand Avenue B (IND) Fulton Street Line Brooklyn Mezzanine to both eastern corners of Bedford Avenue and Fulton Street (2)[159][160][154] April 9, 1936 1950 The entrances were boarded up, and were only opened after a fight by the Bedford-Stuyvesant Neighborhood Council. After the decision to open it was announced, turnstiles and a change booth were installed in the entrance.[158]
Utica Avenue Western corners of Stuyvesant Avenue and Fulton Street c. June 1936[948] The opening of the entrances was urged by the Fulton-Macon Civic Association, which sent a petition to Chairman of the Board of Transportation, John Delaney. He ordered that the entrances be reopened in June 1936.
46th Street B (IND) Queens Boulevard Line Queens Northeastern corner of Newtown Road and 48th Street (1) August 19, 1933 After October 1933 The Astoria Heights Taxpayers Association circulated petitions in October 1933 demanding that these entrances be opened.[949]
Southeastern corner of 48th Street and Broadway (1)
63rd Drive–Rego Park station 63rd Drive and Queens Boulevard (1) December 31, 1936 March 15, 1943 The entrance was opened after a four year effort by the Rego Park Democratic Club demanding its opening. Superintendent of the IND had said that the cost of maintaining a change booth was unwarranted. The entrance was to be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily.[950]
67th Avenue Eastern corners of 67th Drive and Queens Boulevard (2) February 5, 1962 This entrance has been built along with the rest of the station, but had not been opened until this point because the station's ridership had not warranted it.[951] The reopening was also prompted by action from civic organizations. The change booth would be open from 6 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Monday to Friday.[952]
75th Avenue Southeastern corner of 75th Road and Queens Boulevard (1) July to October 1938 This entrance opened due to increased ridership from six new apartment buildings in the area.[953] The owners of these six new apartment buildings, Cord Meyer Development Company, local homeowners and civic associations placed pressure on the Board of Transportation to open the entrance in July 1938.[954]
Queens Plaza Bridge Plaza[955] August 19, 1933 After August 1933
Steinway Street Northeastern and southwestern corners of 34th Avenue and Steinway Street (1) After October 1933 The Astoria Heights Taxpayers Association circulated petitions in October 1933 demanding that these entrances be opened.[949]
Woodhaven Boulevard Northeastern corner of 92nd Street and Queens Boulevard December 31, 1936 After December 1938 The opening of the entrance was urged by the Elmhurst, Queens, Community Council. The group threatened to "go down and open it up themselves" if the Board of Transportation did not do so.[956]

Unfinished or unopened entrances[edit]

BMT[edit]

  • Rector Street - provision at south end of uptown platform to Exchange Alley on east side of Trinity Place[957][364]:626

IRT[edit]

  • Elder Avenue - provisions for entrances at the northwest and southeast corners of Elder Avenue and Westchester Avenue.[958]
  • Lexington Avenue/51st Street - provisions for a second stairway from the GE Building, further to the west on 51st Street.[805]
  • Winthrop Street - former/demolished exit or provision at north end of uptown platform to Winthrop Street on west side of Nostrand Avenue[959]

IND[edit]

  • Steinway Street - provision for entrance to southeastern corner of 34th Avenue and Steinway Street. Space used by Station Department.
  • 46th Street - provisions at middle of platforms to 47th Street and Broadway; booth N316B southbound[319][146] that formerly served the old Madison Square Garden Complex. Space on the N/B platform used by the Station Department.
  • 75th Avenue - provision for entrance to north side of Queens Boulevard at 75th Road,[960] space used by Division of Stations
  • Broadway (IND Crosstown Line) - northwestern corner of South 4th Street and Union Avenue, northeastern corner of Meserole Street and Union Avenue - stairs S9 & S10;[961] provision for entrance to northeastern corner of Johnson Avenue and Union Avenue, now used as a pipe chamber[221]
  • Flushing Avenue - provisions at middle of platforms to Wallabout Street and Union Avenue. Northbound provision used as a Structural Storage Room; Southbound provision used as a Store Room
  • Fort Hamilton Parkway - never-opened exit to west side of Prospect Avenue at Reeve Place
    • Property owner of 1246 Prospect Avenue filed a suit, claiming entrance obstructed access to their property, which was scheduled to be tried on January 20, 1936.
    • Deemed by Board of Transportation report to be not be needed for a considerable period; stair closed and slabbed, structure removed.
    • Report stated that the entrance could be reopened at its former location with the consent of the owner, or at the curb line without owner's consent when "traffic warrants reopening"[962]
  • Greenpoint Avenue - provisions at middle of platforms to Java Street and Manhattan Avenue. N/B side used for a Structures Room; S/B side used by Station Department[146]
  • Kew Gardens—Union Turnpike - provisions at Northwestern corner of Queens Boulevard and Union Turnpike[963]
    • Accessed through passage for car drop-off zone on west side of Union Turnpike underneath Queens Boulevard[212]:151
  • Myrtle–Willoughby Avenues - provisions at middle of platforms to Vernon Avenue and Marcy Avenue[964][343] Northbound provision used as a communications room; southbound provision used as a Station Department room
  • High Street - never-opened exit to southeastern corner of Cadman Plaza East (originally Washington Street) and Red Cross Place[965][966]
  • Nostrand Avenue — never-opened exit to the northern corners of Arlington Place and Fulton Street, stairs S5 and S6.[84]
    • Removed and filled in with concrete in late December 1934 or January 1935.[967]
  • 59th Street—Columbus Circle — likely never-opened easement exit to the southwestern corner of 61st Street and Central Park West into a building.[433]:320, 325
  • Second Avenue - never-opened exit to median of Houston Street near Forsyth Street from a now-closed mezzanine area, and provision at closed mezzanine area to south side of Houston Street at Houston Street Playground.
    • May be fare control area N522.
  • Seventh Avenue–53rd Street - never-opened exit under substation at 126 53rd Street (just east of 6½ Avenue), stair S1, control area N302.[146][968][969] Spaced used for Transformer Closet, Circuit Breaker House
  • West Fourth Street–Washington Square station — Southeastern corner of Washington Place and Sixth Avenue to lower mezzanine, Stair S5. Space partially occupied by police room. The portion of the mezzanine in front of the entrance is used by the Structure D Night Force.[629] Entrance partially constructed along with the station, but never opened. A small shed at street level had protected the entrance, which included a stairwell and an unused escalator well. In 1952, the property above the entrance easement was sold, along with the easement, with the understanding that the owner would provide a concrete slab to protect the entrance.[970]

Entrances that were initially slated for closure[edit]

Station Division Line Borough Location Reason for not being closed Ridership (2017)[175] Ridership rank out of 425 (2017)[175]
62nd Street/New Utrecht Avenue B (BMT) Sea Beach Line

West End Line

Brooklyn 15th Avenue and 63rd Street
  • In 1992, the NYCTA proposed closing this entrance when token booth D006 was closed. At the same time, it proposed closing the booth at all times, and had that come to pass, this entrance would have been closed at all times.[834]
Borough Hall/

Court Street

A (IRT)

B (BMT)

Eastern Parkway Line

Lexington Avenue Line
Fourth Avenue Line

Brooklyn Southwestern corner of Montague Street and Clinton Street[46]
The proposal to close this entrance, along with two at two other stations, was initially released in 1982, with a public hearing.[971]
The entrance and those at two other stations were revisited in 1983. The decision to close the station was postponed to the following MTA board meeting so it could be studied further. Initially, the NYCTA cited the design preference of the architect rehabilitating the station as the rationale for the closure, but later stated that safety concerns were the real issue. The move to close the entrance was opposed by City Council President Carol Bellamy and local residents.[972] This entrance was to be closed for being too far away from the token booth.[973] 10,693,598 28
Carroll Street B (IND) Culver Line Brooklyn Passageway to Southeastern corner of Second Place and Smith Street
  • Closing of passageway, entrance, and high exit-turnstile proposed in 1992
Church Avenue Passageway to Southern corners of McDonald Avenue and Church Avenue
  • Closure proposed in 1992
Lafayette Avenue B (IND) Fulton Street Line Brooklyn Southwestern corner of Lafayette Avenue and South Portland Avenue (S8-M10);[48] 1,621,121 286
Metropolitan Avenue/Lorimer Street B (IND/BMT) Crosstown Line

Canarsie Line

Brooklyn Northeastern corner of Union Avenue and Metropolitan Avenue, stair S5[145]
  • Exit-only staircase[145]
  • Planned to be closed during the 2000 station renovation project[145]
  • Was intended to improve security by concentrating riders at the full-time booth at the southwestern corner of the intersection[145]
  • 35 daily riders would have been required to walk an additional 480 feet (150 m)[145]

Southeastern corner of Union Avenue and Metropolitan Avenue, stair S7[145]

  • Planned to be closed during the 2000 station renovation project along with the other staircase at this corner, which was perpendicular to this staircase[145]
  • Intended to help reconfigure the mezzanine to improve the transfer at the station for 13,000 riders[145]
  • To improve the transfer, a connection would have needed to be created in the mezzanine by putting into place a corridor within fare control across the free zone that was served by the pairs of street staircases on both side of Union Avenue, requiring the closure of one pair. It was decided to close the eastern staircases because they were much less used than the western staircases and because having the booth located adjacent to the western pair would allow transfer movement to be done more smoothly.[336]
  • 1,400 daily riders would have been required to walk an additional 90 feet (27 m) to the exits on the west side[145]
5,010,601 97
14th Street–Union Square A (IRT)

B (BMT)

Lexington Avenue Line
Broadway Line
Canarsie Line
Manhattan Southwestern corner of 14th Street and Fourth Avenue (1)
  • Was to be closed in a 1994 proposal as part of a plan to improve station circulation.Cite error: A <ref> tag is missing the closing </ref> (see the help page).

[974]

63rd Drive–Rego Park B (IND) Queens Boulevard Line Queens Junction Boulevard and 63rd Road
Jackson Heights–Roosevelt Avenue/74th Street A (IRT)/

B (IND)

Flushing Line

Queens Boulevard Line

Queens Eastern corners of Broadway and 75th Street (2)[975]
  • Street stairs S1 and S2; planned to be closed and replaced by new stairs on the west side of 75th Street[975]
  • Would allow for the closure of the east end of the mezzanine.[975] Intended to improve security by moving the stairs closer to the full-time booth[975]
17,095,073 17
Fordham Road B (IND) Concourse Line The Bronx Northeastern corner of 188th Street and Grand Concourse[45] 3,843,008 132

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Italicized if different from WNYC map
  2. ^ a b c d e f Ridership lower than usual due to station renovation closure
  3. ^ Station was destroyed in the September 11 attacks and reopened on September 8, 2018
  4. ^ The hours can be seen in the following video at the 0:52 mark on the door.[881]

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