User:Mann jess/sandbox

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Draft 1[edit]

Chiropractic is a form of alternative medicine which attempts to diagnose and treat patients through manipulation of their musculoskeletal system, especially the spine. It is a marginal health care profession traditionally based on vitalism. While chiropractors share many attributes of primary care providers, chiropractic is considered more of a specialty such as dentistry or podiatry. It uses manual therapy, including manipulation of the spine, joints, and soft tissues as well as exercises and lifestyle counseling. Traditional chiropractic assumes that spine problems interfere with the body's general functions and innate intelligence, a notion that brings ridicule from mainstream health care.

D.D. Palmer founded chiropractic in the 1890s, and his son B.J. Palmer helped to expand it in the early 20th century. It has two main groups: "straights", now the minority, emphasize vitalism, innate intelligence and spinal adjustments, and consider vertebral subluxations to be the cause of all disease; "mixers", the majority, are more open to conventional medical techniques, such as exercise, massage, and ice therapy. Chiropractic is well established in the U.S., Canada and Australia. It overlaps with other manual-therapy professions, including massage therapy, osteopathy, and physical therapy. Chiropractic care is most often used for low back pain.

Throughout its history, chiropractic has been controversial, battling with mainstream medicine and sustained by pseudoscientific ideas that are not based on solid science. Despite the general consensus of public health professionals regarding the benefits of vaccination, there are significant disagreements among chiropractors, which has led to negative impacts on public vaccination and acceptance of chiropractic. The American Medical Association called chiropractic an "unscientific cult" and boycotted it until losing an antitrust case in 1987. Chiropractic has developed a strong political base and sustained demand for services; in recent decades, it has gained more legitimacy and greater acceptance among medical physicians and health plans in the U.S., and evidence-based medicine has been used to review research studies and generate practice guidelines. Chiropractic remains at a crossroads, and in order to progress it would need to embrace science and not ideological dogma.

Studies about chiropractic have conflicting results. One found spinal manipulation was not shown effective for any condition, and a Cochrane review found it ineffective for low back pain. The cost-effectiveness of chiropractic is unknown. Evidence published by practitioners show the therapy is safe, but there is no systematic reporting, and the number of adverse results is not known. There are reports of mild to serious adverse effects, with serious or fatal complications in rare cases.

Draft 2[edit]

... D.D. Palmer founded chiropractic in the 1890s, and his son B.J. Palmer helped to expand it in the early 20th century. Some modern chiropractors now incorporate conventional medical techniques, such as exercise, massage, and ice therapy, in addition to chiropractic's traditional vitalistic underpinnings. Chiropractic is well established in the U.S., Canada and Australia. It overlaps with other manual-therapy professions, including massage therapy, osteopathy, and physical therapy. Chiropractic care is most often used for low back pain.

Throughout its history, chiropractic has been controversial, battling with mainstream medicine and sustained by pseudoscientific ideas. Despite the general consensus of public health professionals regarding the benefits of vaccination, there are significant disagreements among chiropractors, which has led to negative impacts on public vaccination and acceptance of chiropractic. The American Medical Association boycotted chiropractic until 1987, but in recent decades, chiropractic has developed a strong political base and sustained demand for services. Medical guidelines have been developed for the profession, and it has seen coverage by most health plans in the United States. ...


DRN[edit]

Response for DRN before section was removed.

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Per NEG's request, I posted a list of questions I feel have not been answered here. I limited my summary to Talk:Climate change skeptic. To summarize here:

  1. Does climate change denial discuss the subject of "climate change skepticism"?
  2. If so, why should we redirect climate change skepticism away from an article which discusses it explicitly, and to an article which does not.
  3. In reply to pointers to NPOV:
    1. What sources have been overlooked or misinterpreted?
    2. Why are the sources at climate change denial (and reproduced on Talk:Climate change skeptic) insufficient to justify our current coverage
    3. Are there any contrary sources?
  4. In reply to pointers to BLP:
    1. Why does BLP apply to climate change denial or its redirects?
    2. Are there any BLP vios introduced by redirecting to climate change denial?

I'm not sure this is the right venue, but I'm happy to participate if it is likely to lead anywhere. Thanks.   — Jess· Δ 16:08, 7 July 2015 (UTC)