User:Murgh/Uruguayan wine

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Uruguay is .. produce Uruguayan wine.

The fourth largest wine-producing country of South America, after Argentina, Chile and Brazil.[1][2][3]

It is widely held opinion that Uruguayan wine production is making considerbable progress.[2][3][4][5][6]

History[edit]

Commercial viticulture was introduced to Uruguay in 1870, after Basques introduced the grape variety Tannat which became known in Uruguay as Harriague, named after Don Pascual Harriague credited with importing the vine.[3] The total Uruguayan plantings of Tannat would eventually surpass that of France.[1] By 1996 the Uruguayan vineyard area was ca. 10,000 hectares (25,000 acres), and by 2003, ca. 11,000 hectares (27,000 acres) were under vine.[2]

the largest concentration in the regions of Montevideo, San José and Canelones.[3]

Prior to the mid 1990s the common Uruguayan wine was a deep rose, similar to a Spanish clarete, made from a sweet and astringent blend of Tannat and Muscat Hamburg, with possible additions of the hybrid Isabella. Hybrid grapes have since undergone large scale replacement with more internationally common grape varieties, such as Pinot Blanc (possibly Chenin Blanc), Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, and Merlot, as well as to a lesser degree Riesling, Gewürztraminer, and Viognier. A national specialty is Vidiella, a variant of Folle Noire.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Robinson, Jancis, ed. (1999). "Uruguay". The Oxford Companion to Wine (2nd ed.). winepros.com.au. 
  2. ^ a b c Stevenson, Tom (2005). The Sotheby’s Wine Encyclopedia (4th ed.). London: Dorling Kindersley. pp. 540–542. ISBN 0756613248. 
  3. ^ a b c d Lorch, Wink, wine-pages.com Uruguay - South America's 'other' wine country
  4. ^ Penn, Cyril, Wine Business (July 25, 2001). Uruguay is Ready!
  5. ^ Olivera, Yanina, The Telegraph (March 19, 2010). Uruguay is wine world's rising star
  6. ^ Capos, Claudia, Los Angeles Times (November 25, 2008). Oenophile's delight: No corking Uruguay's rising status as wine country

{{Wine by country}} [[Category:Wine by country]] [[Category:Economy of Uruguay]]