User:Netscott/NPOV image policy

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If the subject of an article covers a disputed concept or idea then in order to maintain neutral point of view Wikipedia must not add images (particularly lead images) to the article that support one view of a concept or another without properly qualifying the image in the context of the article.

To illustrate how this works the following examples will show an incorrect version and subsequently a corrected version. All that is changed between the two examples is the text of the caption that accompanies the image. In the context of these examples the article will be about the hypothetical creature known as the Duckgull, a cross between a seagull and a duck. Because the first example's caption does not clearly identify the subject of the picture nor establish the picture's relevance to the article nor context then as a lead image on the Duckgull article Wikipedia is implicitly saying that the image is that of a "Duckgull" and takes Amy B. Gous' point of view. In the second example this is rectified.

Duckgull non-neutral version[edit]

Drawing provided by Thomas Samuel Kuhn.

Duckgull is the name given a newly discovered animal reported to exist in New Zealand [1]. Dr. Amy B. Guous reported her findings in an article published on January 13, 2006 by the journal Nature. She described the creature as having physical features and mannerism similiar to both ducks and seagulls.

Existence disputed[edit]

In a June 27, 2006 edition of the journal Science Dr. Var E. Doubtfire a resident zoologist for the Auckland Zoo reported that he observed the creature as well and that based upon its mannerisms and the fact that it could not fly it was likely a new species of rabbit. [2]

"The creature hopped about and ate grass and what looked like two halves of a beak twitched separately when a sound was made. If one looks at Thomas Samuel Kuhn's drawing one can clearly see the rabbit's head tilted back with its nose pointing up slightly and the 'beak' is actually a pair of ears".

Duckgull neutral version[edit]

Dr. Amy B. Guous utilized this image to show the appearance of the Duckgull in her report. Drawing by Thomas Samuel Kuhn.

Duckgull is the name given a newly discovered animal reported to exist in New Zealand [3]. Dr. Amy B. Guous reported her findings in an article published on January 13, 2006 by the journal Nature. [4] She described the creature as having physical features and mannerism similiar to both ducks and seagulls.

Existence disputed[edit]

In a June 27, 2006 edition of the journal Science Dr. Var E. Doubtfire a resident zoologist for the Auckland Zoo reported that he observed the creature as well and that based upon its mannerisms and the fact that it could not fly it was likely a new species of rabbit. [5]

"The creature hopped about and ate grass and what looked like two halves of a beak twitched separately when a sound was made. If one looks at Thomas Samuel Kuhn's drawing one can clearly see the rabbit's head tilted back with its nose pointing up slightly and the 'beak' is actually a pair of ears".