User:P64/FSF/Children's/Guardian

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Guardian Children's Fiction Prize


Soonchild was one of eight books on the longlist for the 2012 Guardian Children's Fiction Prize.[1] The Prize is judged by a panel of children's writers and annually recognises one British children's novel by an author who has not won it.

Her fourth book, Sparks, published by Marion Lloyd in 2010, was one of eight books on the longlist for that year's Guardian Children's Fiction Prize.[2][3] The Prize is judged by a panel of children's writers and it annually recognises one new British children's novel by an author who has not won it. The judges recommended Sparks for readers age 9 and up. According to their summary, the adventure novel features three children who decide to follow their deceased grandfather's unusual instructions regarding his funeral. The mission sets them against the adults in the family and against the law.[2]

Two years later Kennen made the Guardian Prize longlist again with Bullet Boys, published by Scholastic in 2012 (recommended for ages 14+).[4] It had been The Guardian newspaper's "teen book of the month" for March, initiated by Anthony McGowan's review and by Kennen's account, "How I wrote Bullet Boys".[5][6]

[2] [4]

[6] [5]


See also[edit]

External Links[edit]

Category:Guardian Children's Fiction Prize winning works Category:2012 novels

[7]

Guardian[edit]

Guardian Award - nice to know

still 10 books per publisher?
do author/agent/publisher contract for prize entry
are nominations public? revealed to authors?
datespan? coincidence with Book Week
datespan? UK/Comm resident or citizen

EVERY AWARD A COMPETITION?

Every award may be interpreted as a tacit competition. When Mal Peet won the 2009 Prize, he told the newspaper, "I've always had my eye on the Guardian prize but it's always evaded me. My books have never even made the shortlist before, and I'd always sit at home gnashing my teeth and tearing my hair."[8]

GUARDIAN [9] --annual source from 2001 with some format variation [10] --our only source for 1967 to 2000 prize winners

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Discover the Guardian children's fiction prize 2012 longlist - gallery". The Guardian. 8 June 2012. Retrieved 16 June 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c "The Guardian children's fiction prize 2010". Julia Eccleshare. The Guardian 28 May 2010. Retrieved 2012-10-26.
  3. ^ Cite error: The named reference sparks was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  4. ^ a b "Discover the Guardian children's fiction prize 2012 longlist - gallery". theguardian 8 June 2012. Retrieved 2012-10-26.
  5. ^ a b "Bullet Boys by Ally Kennen – review". Anthony McGowan. guardian.co.uk 2 March 2012. Retrieved 2012-10-26.
  6. ^ a b "Ally Kennen: How I wrote Bullet Boys". Ally Kennen. guardian.co.uk 2 March 2012. Retrieved 2012-10-26.
  7. ^ Guardian children's fiction prize 2011] (top page). theguardian. 2012-
  8. ^ "Mal Peet wins Guardian children's fiction prize: A version of Othello which casts the Moor of Venice as a South American football star wins Mal Peet the 2009 Guardian children's fiction prize". Alison Flood. guardian.co.uk, 8 October 2009. Accessed 16 June 2012.
  9. ^ Guardian Children's Fiction Prize 2001 (top page). guardian.co.uk. 2012-08-06.
  10. ^ "Guardian children's fiction prize relaunched: Entry details and list of past winners". guardian.co.uk 12 March 2001. Retrieved 2012-08-06.

Trial formats[edit]


Some trial formats for combined annual lists are displayed above. For now ignore the internal format of each listing (title first, red and blue links, price and age recommendations).

  1. Lists 2011 to 2006 are alphabetical by author surname. 2005 to 2001 are ordered by outcome: winner first, then other shortlist, then other longlist.
  2. Bullets may be unnecessary. Rather than used for every listing 2011/2007/2002, they may distinguish the shortlist from the rest of the longlist. 2009/2008 show that bullets ruin vertical spacing so that idea works only if the sequence is winner/short/long, see 2005/2004. Or bullets may be abandoned in favor of other symbols and boldface (2006/2003/2001 and 2003 below).
  3. Bold marks the winner. Sometimes the winner is also "outdented" by omission of the leading symbol. Immediately below, the winner is simply outdented (and first listed).
  4. Hyphens and their absence subtly distinguish the shortlist 2011 and 2006—which are alphabetical so that the hyphens are crucial—and 2002/2001—where the sequence is winner/short/long so that they are complementary. Contrast 2005/2004 where layout and bullets do the job.
  5. Lists 2010/2007/2003 use two symbols plus (+) and dash (–) rather than a symbol (hyphen and/or bullet) and its absence to distinguish the shortlist.
  6. Immediately below, a radical alternative uses plus/dash and layout, without even bolding the winner.
  7. Below that are two wikitables. Even the second, without display of grey background and lines, adds a lot of framework, with the cost of a lot of work.

2003[1]

Mark Haddon, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (David Fickling)
+ David Almond, The Fire Eaters (Hodder)
+ Kevin Brooks, Lucas (Chicken House)
+ Alex Shearer, The Speed of the Dark (Macmillan)
Marcus Sedgwick, The Book of Dead Days (Orion)
Jean Ure, Bad Alice (Hodder)
Simon French, Where in the World (Little Hare Books)
Keith Gray, Malarkey (Red Fox)

2003[1]

(12+)   Mark Haddon, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (David Fickling)
(10+) + David Almond, The Fire Eaters (Hodder)
(12+) + Kevin Brooks, Lucas (Chicken House)
(11+) + Alex Shearer, The Speed of the Dark (Macmillan)
(10+) – Marcus Sedgwick, The Book of Dead Days (Orion)
(10+) – Jean Ure, Bad Alice (Hodder)
(  9+) – Simon French, Where in the World (Little Hare Books)
(13+) – Keith Gray, Malarkey (Red Fox)
Guardian Children's Fiction Prize (illustration, 2003 only)[1]
age Author Title Publisher
(12+) + Mark Haddon, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time  (David Fickling)
(10+) short David Almond, The Fire Eaters (Hodder)
(12+) short Kevin Brooks, Lucas (Chicken House)
(11+) short Alex Shearer, The Speed of the Dark (Macmillan)
(10+) Marcus Sedgwick, The Book of Dead Days (Orion)
(10+) Jean Ure, Bad Alice (Hodder)
(  9+) Simon French, Where in the World (Little Hare Books)
(13+) Keith Gray, Malarkey (Red Fox)
Guardian Children's Fiction Prize (illustration, 2003 only)[1]
Author Title Publisher age surname
s Mark Haddon The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time  David Fickling 12+ Haddon
s David Almond The Fire Eaters Hodder 10+ Almond
s Kevin Brooks Lucas Chicken House 12+ Brooks
s Alex Shearer The Speed of the Dark Macmillan 11+ Shearer
Simon French Where in the World Little Hare Books   9+ French
Keith Gray Malarkey Red Fox 13+ Gray
Marcus Sedgwick The Book of Dead Days Orion 10+ Sedgwick
Jean Ure Bad Alice Hodder 10+ Ure
  1. ^ a b c d Cite error: The named reference prize2003 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).