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2012 Presidential Election Data[edit]

State Estimated IQ Gross State Product Health Violent Crime Popular Vote Presidential Margin Electoral Votes
Alabama 95.7 0.028 -11.9 0.004 Romney (60.68%) -22.25 09
Alaska 99.0 0.047 -0.8 0.006 Romney (54.43%) -13.26 03
Arizona 97.4 0.032 -1.1 0.005 Romney (54.02%) -10.05 11
Arkansas 97.5 0.027 -14.3 0.005 Romney (60.57%) -23.69 06
California 95.5 0.040 4.9 0.006 Obama (59.35%) 21.08 55
Colorado 101.6 0.041 12.5 0.004 Obama (51.23%) 04.80 09
Connecticut 103.1 0.049 15.6 0.003 Obama (58.05%) 17.29 07
Delaware 100.4 0.059 -2.3 0.006 Obama (58.61%) 18.63 03
Florida 98.4 0.032 -9.9 0.007 Obama (50.01%) 00.87 29
Georgia 98.0 0.036 -9.5 0.005 Romney (53.34%) -07.84 16
Hawaii 95.6 0.036 15.1 0.003 Obama (70.54%) 42.71 04
Idaho 101.4 0.029 8.6 0.002 Romney (64.51%) -31.87 04
Illinois 99.9 0.039 0.3 0.006 Obama (57.52%) 16.70 20
Indiana 101.7 0.034 0.5 0.003 Romney (54.33%) -10.59 11
Iowa 103.2 0.034 14.5 0.003 Obama (51.89%) 05.58 06
Kansas 102.8 0.033 7.2 0.004 Romney (60.25%) -22.26 06
Kentucky 99.4 0.030 -7.8 0.003 Romney (60.51%) -22.70 08
Louisiana 95.3 0.031 -20.5 0.006 Romney (57.80%) -17.24 08
Maine 103.4 0.030 14.3 0.001 Obama (55.96%) 15.10 04
Maryland 99.7 0.037 -0.9 0.007 Obama (61.44%) 24.99 10
Massachussetts 104.3 0.046 16.9 0.005 Obama (60.76%) 23.12 11
Michigan 100.5 0.035 0.8 0.005 Obama (54.30%) 09.52 16
Minnesota 103.7 0.040 23.3 0.003 Obama (52.65%) 07.70 10
Mississippi 94.2 0.024 -20.7 0.003 Romney (55.59%) -12.04 06
Missouri 101.0 0.033 -3.3 0.005 Romney (53.88%) -09.62 10
Montanta 103.4 0.026 4.0 0.003 Romney (55.53%) -13.99 03
Nebraska 102.3 0.036 11.2 0.003 Romney (60.47%) -22.64 05
Nevada 96.5 0.039 -5.5 0.006 Obama (52.30%) 06.56 06
New Hampshire 104.2 0.037 22.2 0.002 Obama (51.97%) 05.57 04
New Jersey 102.8 0.044 9.0 0.004 Obama (57.95%) 16.90 14
New Mexico 95.7 0.029 -7.5 0.007 Obama (52.86%) 09.88 05
New York 100.7 0.043 -0.4 0.005 Obama (62.62%) 26.65 29
North Carolina 100.2 0.036 -5.6 0.005 Romney (50.46%) -02.16 15
North Dakota 103.8 0.032 14.5 0.001 Romney (58.32%) -19.62 03
Ohio 101.8 0.034 1.8 0.003 Obama (50.29%) 02.00 18
Oklahoma 99.3 0.028 -11.2 0.005 Romney (66.77%) -33.54 07
Oregon 101.2 0.033 7.9 0.003 Obama (54.38%) 11.99 07
Pennsylvania 101.5 0.035 3.2 0.004 Obama (52.01%) 05.26 20
Rhode Island 99.5 0.035 11.6 0.003 Obama (62.68%) 27.42 04
South Carolina 98.4 0.030 -15.3 0.008 Romney (54.67%) -10.69 09
South Dakota 102.8 0.034 8.9 0.002 Romney (57.89%) -18.03 03
Tennessee 97.7 0.033 -13.8 0.007 Romney (59.48%) -20.41 11
Texas 100.0 0.036 -4.6 0.006 Romney (57.20%) -15.84 38
Utah 101.1 0.032 18.2 0.002 Romney (72.75%) -47.90 06
Vermont 103.8 0.032 19.8 0.001 Obama (66.57%) 35.60 03
Virginia 101.9 0.040 6.8 0.003 Obama (51.80%) 03.73 13
Washington 101.9 0.039 11.5 0.003 Obama (55.85%) 14.13 12
West Virginia 98.7 0.025 -10.1 0.003 Romney (62.35%) -26.86 05
Wisconsin 102.9 0.035 12.7 0.002 Obama (52.80%) 06.71 10
Wyoming 102.4 0.041 4.3 0.003 Romney (68.64%) -40.82 03


A Better Class of Voter[edit]

In recent U.S. Presidential elections, several websites have presented a since-debunked chart purporting to correlate IQ with political affiliation. Most such hoaxes (or victims thereof) are traceable to this Robert Calvert posting with shakily extrapolated data (which many others--including the Economist have sloppily misattributed to Richard Lynn's and Tatu Vanhannen's IQ and the Wealth of Nations)[1].

The 2012 Presidential contest provides an opportunity to determine whether any such correlation is demonstrable between authoritative state intelligence data and final electoral results (broken down by state). The table above combines IQ- and other state data (from the Michael A. McDaniel study Estimating state IQ: Measurement challenges and preliminary correlates (published in the journal Intelligence Volume 34)[2] with state electoral data taken from Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections).

The above table is sortable, demonstrating real correlation between several attributes:

  • Of the twenty-eight most-intelligent states, Mitt Romney won only ten--most with such insignificant populations that of the 250 electoral votes available in those twenty-eight states, Romney won only 54 electoral votes.
  • Of the twenty-nine most-productive states, Mitt Romney won only eight, gaining 91 out of an available 373 electoral votes.
  • Of the twenty-nine healthiest states, Mitt Romney won only nine, gaining 44 out of an available 327 electoral votes.
  • Of the twenty-one most-populous--alternatively, urbane--states, Mitt Romney won only seven, settling for 112 electoral votes of the 379 available.
  • In the twenty-one most-violent states, Mitt Romney was much more popular, winning over half--eleven states--for 134 of the 318 electoral votes.

These results are not simply artifacts of a landslide in which Obama might be expected to have taken the majority of states no matter how they are grouped--Romney voters dominate the undesirable end of the scale:

  • Of the seventeen least-intelligent states, Obama won only five.
  • Of the twenty-four least-productive states, Obama won only six.
  • Of the twenty least-healthy states, Obama won only five. Romney won all of the bottom eight scorers; of the bottom eleven, Obama won only Florida (by a margin of 0.87%).
  • Romney won a majority of the most-violent states (eleven out of twenty-one), while Obama won a majority of the least-violent states (thirteen out of twenty-four).

Categorically, it seems, Conservatives are unhealthy, provincial, and uneducated; the states they control are poor and violent. Urbane, left-leaning voters are healthier, wealthier, and more intelligent.

Notes[edit]

The McDaniel data are taken directly from the table on page 612 of Intelligence, Volume 34 (2006). The methodologies applied toward the calculation of normalized values for the per-state attributes--Estimated IQ, Health, Violent Crime, and Gross State Product--are described on pages 609 and 610 (ibid.).

Of particular interest, on page 608 (ibid.) McDaniel addresses the problem of extrapolating meaningful state-to-state comparisons from IQ and the wealth of nations (Lynn, R., & Vanhanen, T. Praeger, 2002. Westport, CT). On page 617, McDaniel concludes by comparing the merits and utility of Estimating state IQ: Measurement challenges and preliminary correlates (2006) with those of IQ and the wealth of nations (2002) vis–à–vis correlation of IQ with other attributes at the state level.

Please feel free to leave comments on the Talk Page. Patronanejo (Talk Page) 17:05, 15 November 2012 (UTC)

Epistemic Closure[edit]

I was flabbergasted. Until that moment I had not realized how closed the right-wing mind had become. Even assuming that my friends’ view of the Times’ philosophy was correct, which it most certainly was not,[3] why would they not want to know what their enemy was thinking? This was my first exposure to what has been called “epistemic closure” among conservatives—living in their own bubble where nonsensical ideas circulate with no contradiction.[4]

P.J. O'Rourke[edit]

....It's not so much that what they say is wrong, though Ann Coulter does seem to be completely crazy.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lynn, R. and Vanhanen, T. (2002). IQ and the wealth of nations. Westport, CT: Praeger. ISBN 0-275-97510-X
  2. ^ McDaniel, M (2006). "Estimating state IQ: Measurement challenges and preliminary correlates" (PDF). Intelligence. 34 (6): 607–19. doi:10.1016/j.intell.2006.08.007. 
  3. ^ Not one person had read it or cared in the slightest what the New York Times had to say about anything. They all viewed it as having as much credibility as Pravda and a similar political philosophy as well....
  4. ^ Bartlett, Bruce (November 26, 2012). "Revenge of the Reality-Based Community | My life on the Republican right—and how I saw it all go wrong". The American Conservative. Retrieved 12 December 2012. 
  5. ^ "Mad Mumblings". Mad Magazine Online. Retrieved 12 December 2012. 


Set index articles[edit]

I'm a bit concerned by your addition of infoboxes to set index article pages - generally, they do not have infoboxes, as they are not intended to be articles. --Rschen7754 08:26, 14 October 2013 (UTC)

No idea why this comment got my attention but I am fascinated out of all proportion. I have absolutely no idea what it means to set index article pages--or how it might be accomplished through the addition of infoboxes.
I'm sure I have no right to ask, but I'm trying to imagine how this might possibly comprise objectionable behaviour--anyone got time to link to an example?
File:Rainbow trout transparent.png/40px-Rainbow trout transparent.png Patronanejo (talk) 16:00, 16 October 2013 (UTC)

Schleichter's Fable[edit]

Side-by-Side comparison of Schleichter's Fable as translated into Proto-Indo-European by H. Craig Melchert (2009) vs Andrew Byrd (2013)