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into the wild blue yonder!

Hello to all,

I'm Saschaporsche, started my first Wiki changes in 2008, made my first page in 2009. I really enjoy taking part in this great project ! Please do feel free to contact me if you have any questions about my contributions!

Saschaporsche (talk)

Funeral blues , W.H. Auden

Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone,
Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone,
Silence the pianos and with muffled drum
Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come.

Let aeroplanes circle moaning overhead
Scribbling on the sky the message He is Dead.
Put crepe bows round the white necks of the public doves,
Let the traffic policemen wear black cotton gloves.

He was my North, my South, my East and West,
My working week and my Sunday rest,
My noon, my midnight, my talk, my song;
I thought that love would last forever: I was wrong.

The stars are not wanted now; put out every one,
Pack up the moon and dismantle the sun,
Pour away the ocean and sweep up the woods;
For nothing now can ever come to any good.

Remarkeble: A Róbert Berény painting titled Sleeping Lady with Black Vase, whose whereabouts had been unknown since 1928, was re-discovered by chance in 2009 by art historian Gergely Barki upon watching the 1999 movie, Stuart Little, with his daughter, where the painting was used as a prop. An assistant set designer had bought the painting cheaply from a California antique store for use in the film, and had kept it in her home after production ended. The painting was sold at auction in Budapest on December 13th, 2014 for €229,500.

Lady Godiva door John Collier, ca. 1898
Francesco Guardi - The Doge on the Bucentaur at San Niccolò del Lido
Boeing C-17 Globemaster III demonstrating the use of reverse thrust to push the aircraft backwards
TF-104G with NASA NB-52B in flight 1979.
Dark grey and black static with coloured vertical rainbow beams over part of the image. A small pale blue point of light is barely visible.
Seen from about 6 billion kilometers (3.7 billion miles), Earth appears as a tiny dot (the blueish-white speck approximately halfway down the brown band to the right) within the darkness of deep space.[1]
KLM 737 wing
Orion in the 9th century Leiden Aratea

  1. ^ "From Earth to the Solar System-Pale Blue Dot". Retrieved 2011-07-27.