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Fairmount Park Art Association
A logo reading "Fairmount Park Art Association, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania"
Abbreviation FPAA
Formation 1872 [1]
Purpose/focus Commission, interpret, and preserve public art in Philadelphia
Headquarters 1616 Walnut Street, Suite 2012
Philadelphia, PA 19103
Region served City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Executive Director Penny Balkin Bach[2]
Website http://www.fpaa.org/

The Fairmount Park Art Association (or FPAA) was founded in 1872 to provide public art in Fairmount Park in Philadelphia. As the first private, nonprofit organization in the United States dedicated to providing public art, it was founded to "to increase the appreciation and love of art in our midst." It has commissioned over yyy sculptures and other public artworks and has purchased or otherwise acquired xxx sculptures in the city. It also exercises most of the functions associated with ownership or stewardship, such as maintenance and restoration, over many sculptures owned by the City of Philadelphia, Fairmount Park, and several charitable trusts.[3] It participates in city planning projects, continues to commission new public artworks, has established a sculpture conservation program, and sponsors exhibitions, publications, and educational programs.[4].

The FPAA now provides information to the public for outdoor sculpture throughout Philadelphia using innovative technology.[5] In 2010, the PNC Foundation gave $75,000 to the FPAA for a public art marketing program which it used for its "Museum without Walls" program. This program uses the internet, QR codes, and short audio interviews.[6] Sort out refs

History[edit]

First president Anthony J. Drexel Controls or maintains all of the city's public artworks (almost as vague as "Has stewardship over")

  • “Established in 1872, the Fairmount Park Art Association is the nation’s first private, nonprofit organization dedicated to integrating public art and urban planning. Today, the Art Association continues to promote the appreciation of public art through advocacy efforts and programs that commission, interpret, and preserve public art in Philadelphia.” – New Land Marks Book (2) pg 7
  • “In 1872 the Fairmount Park Art Association was chartered by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and Philadelphia became the first city in America to establish a private, nonprofit citizens’ organization ‘to increase the appreciation and love of art in our midst, to add to the number of its votaries, promote the refinements of life consequent thereon, and encourage artists in the practice of their profession.’ This was to be accomplished by means of contributions, legacies, and donations for the embellishment of the park. In 1906, ratifying longtime practice, the Art Association amended its charter to permit it also to ‘promote and foster the beautiful in the City of Philadelphia, in its architecture, improvements and general plan.’” – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 43
  • “In the late nineteenth century, the founders of the Art Association sought to provide an antidote to encroaching industrialism by introducing art into the landscape. By the turn of the century, the organization’s mission had expanded to ‘promote and foster the beautiful in Philadelphia, in its architecture, improvements, and the city plan.’ This was accomplished not only by the commissioning and placing of sculpture and monuments of enduring character, but also through the Art Association’s planning efforts and its forceful advocacy in support of opportunities for artists to both practice their craft and contribute to society.” – New Land Marks Book (2) pg 13
  • “This group started in 1872 to integrate sculpture into the city, and is the main reason Philadelphia is now said to have more public art than any other city.” – USA Today Article (19)
  • “Over the years, the Art Association has supported city planning projects; commissioned and acquired numerous works of sculpture and public art; established a sculpture conservation program; and sponsored exhibitions, publications, and educational programs.” – New Land Marks Book (2) pg 7
  • “…Philadelphia’s Fairmount Park Art Association can proudly point to its record of the longest continuous involvement in public art in the United States. The Association’s commitment to the integration of art and urban planning has comprised both historic and contemporary issues.” – Going Public (13) pg 26
  • The FPAA “has stewardship over all the city’s public monuments, as well as within the boundaries of Fairmount Park.” – Going Public (13) pg 156
  • Anthony J. Drexel was the first President of the Fairmount Park Art Association – Sculpture of a City (3) pg 57
  • The Executive Director of the Art Association is Penny Balkin Bach – MWW Launch Event Press Release (7)

Mission[edit]

  • “The Fairmount Park Art Association’s mission is to commission, interpret, and preserve public art in Philadelphia. It also works to promote the appreciation of public art through programs and advocacy efforts. The Fairmount Park Art Association works to secure Philadelphia's artistic heritage through programs and advocacy efforts that: promote public interest in public art; preserve and protect existing works of public art for future generations; and commission and support new projects that integrate art, architecture, and urban planning.” Innovation Philadelphia Page (12)
  • The FPAA “acquires, interprets and maintains more than 200 works of art citywide.” – Associated Press Story (5)
  • “… the Art Association works to promote the appreciation of public art through programs and advocacy efforts that commission, interpret, and preserve public art in Philadelphia. We serve hundreds of people directly through our commissioning and educational programs, and thousands indirectly, as they benefit from the accessibility of public art that is one of Philadelphiaʼs hallmarks and a key contributor to its quality of life.” – Labor Monument Press Release (14)
  • “One of its main goals is to help create programs and initiatives that serve as models and best practices for other organizations nationally and internationally.” – Philadelphia’s Public Art: The Full Spectrum (4) pg 4
  • “The Art Association also acts as a conservation information resource, answering queries about conservation considerations for new commissions…’” – Heritage Preservation Website (11)
  • “The Fairmount Park Art Association works closely with the City’s Public Art Office, Fairmount Park, and other organizations and agencies responsible for placing and caring for outdoor sculpture in Philadelphia.” – MWW Launch Event Press Release (7)
  • The FPAA “maintains an inventory of public art in Philadelphia containing over 1,400 entries. A printed copy of the document is updated annually and is available to the public for reference in the Art Department at the Free Library.” – Heritage Preservation Website (11)

Projects and commissions[edit]

Art Association projects include masterworks such as the Cowboy on Kelly Drive and Billy in Rittenhouse Square, as well as contemporary projects such as Mark di Suvero’s Iroquois, which was recently installed on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway.” – Common Ground Press Release (22)

pre-1978[edit]

Public Art Commissions Include:

  • Stone Age in America (1887) by John J. Boyle – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 206)
  • James A. Garfield Monument (1895) by Augustus Saint-Gaudens – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 207
  • General Ulysses S. Grant (1897) by Daniel Chester French and Edward C. Potter – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 208
  • Cowboy (1908) by Frederic Remington – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 212
  • Shakespeare Memorial (1926) by Alexander Stirling Calder – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 217
  • The Spirit of Enterprise (1950-1960) by Jacques Lipchitz – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 223
  • Aero Memorial (1948) by Paul Manship – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 229

post-1977[edit]

  • Fingerspan (1987) by Jody Pinto – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 256
  • Sleeping Woman (1991) by Tom Chimes and Stephen Berg – (1) pg 259


  • The Labor Monument: Philadelphia’s Tribute to the American Worker (2011) by John Kindness Philly.com Article – NLM Commissions (18)
  • Manayunk Stoops: Heart and Home (1996) by Diane Pieri – Philly.com Article – NLM Commissions (18)
  • Embodying Thoreau: Dwelling, Sitting, Watching (2003) by Ed Levine – Philly.com Article – NLM Commissions (18)
  • I have a story to tell you…(2003) by Pepon Osario – Philly.com Article – NLM Commissions (18)
  • Common Ground (2009) by John Stone and Lonnie Graham in collaboration with Lorene Cary for -Project H.O.M.E. – Philly.com Article – NLM Commissions (18)
  • Pavilion in the Trees (1993) by Martin Puryear – Pavilion in the Trees Philly.com Article (18)

Public Art Purchases and Acquisitions Include:

  • Night (1872) by Edward Stauch – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 200
  • Hudson Bay Wolves Quarreling Over the Carcass of a Deer (1872) by Edward Kemeys – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 200
  • Joan of Arc (1890) by Emmanuel Fremiet – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg (207)
  • Dickens and Little Nell (1890) by Frank Edwin Elwell – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 206
  • Lioness Carrying to Her Young a Wild Boar (1886) by Auguste Cain – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 206
  • The Medicine Man (1899) by Cyrus E. Dallin – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 209
  • Duck Girl (1911) by Paul Manship – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 214
  • Penguins (1917) by Albert Laessle – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 215
  • Playing Angels (c. 1950, installed 1972) by Carl Milles – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 230
  • The Wedges (1970) by Robert Morris – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 237
  • Atmosphere and Environment XII (1970) by Louise Nevelson – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 236
  • Mangbusucks (c. 1695, installed 1976), Artist Unknown – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 245
  • Spheres (300-1525, installed 1976), Artist Unknown – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 244
  • Five Water Spouts, Frog, Lintel (12th-13th century, installed 1986) Artists Unknown – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 244
  • Nandi (c. 1500, installed 1976) Artist Unknown – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 244
  • Central Post (c. 1850, installed 1980) Artist Unknown – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 245

Of Note:

  • “In 1889, the French community in Philadelphia, with the aid of the Fairmount Park Art Association, purchased a statue of Joan of Arc from Emmanuel Fremiet, with the stipulation that there would only be three editions of the work: one in Paris, one in Philadelphia, and a third in Nancy, France.” – Fountains of Philadelphia (24) pg 26

Programs[edit]

Conservation Program

  • “In 1982 the Fairmount Park Art Association initiated a landmark conservation program with the generous support of the Pew Charitable Trusts. A select group of the city’s works of historic and artistic significance received initial treatment and continue to receive annual maintenance. Each spring, under the guidance of a professional conservator, the sculpture is inspected, grime and graffiti are removed, the work is washed, and a protective wax coating is applied.” – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg. 190
  • The FPAA organized a conservation program in 1982 to “identify those sculptures in need of conservation attention. Steps in the development of the program include: 1) A survey to assess the condition of a targeted group of artworks; 2) An evaluation of the various conservation methods then available and the controversies surrounding some of those methods; 3) The selection of the conservator who could deal sensitively with the needs of the particular work at hand; and 4) The establishment of treatment priorities.” – Going Public (13) pg 156

Museum Without Walls: AUDIO

  • “On June 10, 2010, the Fairmount Park Art Association launched Museum Without Walls™: AUDIO, a multi-platform, interactive audio experience for Philadelphia’s preeminent collection of public art and outdoor sculpture.” MWW Press Release 2 (23)
  • The program invites “passerby stop, look, listen and experience public art in a new light, through professionally produced three-minute interpretive audio segments revealing the untold histories of of 51 outdoor sculptures at 35 stops along the Benjamin Franklin Parkway and Kelly Drive. The diverse narratives are told by over 100 authentic voices with personal connections to the artwork.” MWW is available to the public for free and on the street via cell phone, audio download, mobile application, or streaming audio on the official program website at museumwithoutwallsaudio.org. – MWW Press Release 1 (15)
  • “Permanent outdoor signage located at each sculpture features dialing instructions for accessing the program by cell phone by calling (215) 399-9000.” – MWW Press Release 1 (15)
  • ”Programs explore personal and cultural connections to the art, while offering insight into the artists and their processes, what the sculptures represent, the history surrounding the works, and why the pieces were commissioned and installed at specific sites in Philadelphia.” – MWW Press Release 1 (15)
  • “The segments sound like a conversation instead of a lecture.” – Associated Press Story (5)
  • “’Museum Without Walls™: AUDIO is ultimately about discovery,’ says Penny Balkin Bach, Executive Director of the Fairmount Park Art Association. ‘The program is a gateway to a larger cultural experience – someone might walk by a sculpture hundreds of times, without ever stopping to think much about it. There is a distinctive story, civic effort, and creative expression behind every public sculpture in Philadelphia. We’ve worked with an outstanding team of professionals to develop a unique program to tell these stories – one that we hope will be a model for public art in other cities across the country.’” – MWW Press Release 1 (15)
  • “Segment producers include Peabody-award winning public radio producers and media artists Ann Heppermann and Kara Oehler; Jonathan Menjivar, Associate Producer with National Public Radio’s Fresh Air with Terry Gross; radio producer and reporter Lu Olkowski; and freelance journalist Ben Calhoun, among others.” – MWW Press Release 1 (15)
  • “The first stop is Robert Indiana's iconic "LOVE" sculpture. Others along the way include Auguste Rodin's "The Thinker" and Emmanuel Fremiet's "Joan of Arc," plus works by Henry Moore, Mark di Suvero, Alexander Calder and Augustus Saint-Gaudens.” – Associated Press Story (5)
  • “Among the 51 sculptures lining the city streets and parks included in the first phase of the program are Iroquois, the monumental steel sculpture by Mark di Suvero (1983-1999, red painted steel), the massive abstract Three-way Piece Number One: Pointsby Henry Moore (1964, bronze, on granite base), and Kopernik, Dudley Talcott’s ode tomodern astronomy (1972, stainless steel, on red granite base). There is also All Wars Memorial to Colored Soldiers and Sailors (1934, bronze and granite), J. Otto Schweizer’s memorial to the state’s African American military men, Emmanuel Fremiet’s memorial to the French heroine Joan of Arc (1890, gilded bronze, on granite base), and Jesus Breaking Bread by Walter Erlebacher (1976, bronze, on bronze plinth and marble base), commissioned for the 41st International Eucharistic Congress.” – MWW Press Release 1 (15)
  • “Museum Without Walls, which was funded by grants, is geared toward tourists as well as locals who have always wondered about particular works of art - or barely noticed them at all.” – Associated Press Story (5)
  • Museum Without Walls™: AUDIO is a program of the Fairmount Park Art Association, in partnership with Fairmount Park, and has been supported by The Pew Center for Arts and Heritage through the Heritage Philadelphia Program and, and by the National Endowment for the Humanities. – MWW Press Release 1 (15)
  • The Fairmount Park Art Association was directly involved in the acquisition and conservation of many of the 51 sculptures featured in the first phase of Museum Without Walls™: AUDIO. – MWW Press Release 1 (15)
  • The Art Association plans to expand the program in the future to include more of the city’s public art. MWW Press Release – MWW Press Release 1 (15)

Full list of sculptures featured in MWW:AUDIO Phase 1 – MWW Launch Event Press Release (7):

  1. LOVE (1976) – Robert Indiana
  2. Three Way Piece Number 1: Points (1964) – Henry Moore
  3. . Three Discs, One Lacking (1968) – Alexander Calder
  4. . Monument to Six Million Jewish Martyrs (1964) – Nathan Rapoport
  5. . General Tadeusz Kosciusko (1978) – Marian Konieszny
  6. . Kopernik (c. 1972) – Dudley Talcott
  7. . Jesus Breaking Bread (1976) – Walter Erlebacher
  8. . Swann Memorial Fountain (1924) – Alexander Stirling Calder
  9. . General Galusha Pennypacker Memorial (1934) – Albert Laessle, initial concept – Charles Grafly
  10. . Shakespeare Memorial (1926) – Alexander Stirling Calder Logan Square between 19th and 20th Streets
  11. . Joseph Leidy (1907) – Samuel Murray and Deinonychus (1987) – Kent Ullberg
  12. . All Wars Memorial to Colored Soldiers and Sailors (1934) – J. Otto Schweizer
  13. . Aero Memorial (1948) – Paul Manship
  14. . Civil War Soldiers and Sailors Memorial (1927) – Hermon Atkins MacNeil
  15. . The Thinker (1902-1904) – Auguste Rodin Rodin Museum
  16. . Iroquois (1983-1999) – Mark di Suvero
  17. . The Washington Monument (1897) – Rudolph Siemering
  18. . Rocky (1980) – Thomas Schomberg
  19. . The Lion Fighter (1858) – Albert Wolf and Mounted Amazon Attacked – a Panther (1837) – August Kiss
  20. . Charioteer of Delphi (5th century B.C., cast c. 1977) Artist Unknown
  21. . Joan of Arc (1890) – Emmanual Frémiet
  22. . The Wedges (1970) – Robert Morris
  23. . Abraham Lincoln (1871) – Randolph Rogers
  24. . The Pilgrim (1904) – Augustus Saint-Gaudens
  25. . Thorfinn Karlsefni (c. 1918) – Einar Jonsson
  26. . Stone Age in America (1887) – John J. Boyle
  27. . Ellen Phillips Samuel Memorial – South Terrace (1933-61) Six sculptures by artists Erwin Frey, Henry Kreis, Harry Rosin and Wheeler Williams
  28. Ellen Phillips Samuel Memorial – Central Terrace (1933-61) Seven sculptures by artists John B. Flannagan, J. Wallace Kelly, Robert Laurent, Jacques Lipchitz, Helene Sardeau, Maurice Sterne and Heinz Warneke
  29. . Ellen Phillips Samuel Memorial – North Terrace (1933-61) Four sculptures by artists Ahron Ben-Shmuel, José de Creft, Koren der Harootian and Waldemar Raemisch
  30. James A. Garfield Monument (1895) – Augustus Saint-Gaudens
  31. . Cowboy (1908) – Frederic Remington
  32. . Playing Angels and Sleeping Woman (See #33 or #34 for individual programs)
  33. Playing Angels (c. 1950) – Carl Milles
  34. . Sleeping Woman (1991) – Stephen Berg and Tom Chimes
  35. . General Ulysses S. Grant (1897) – Daniel Chester French and Edward C. Potter
  36. . John B. Kelly (1965) – Harry Rosin

New Land Marks: public art, community, and the meaning of place

  • “New•Land•Marks: public art, community, and the meaning of place is a project of Philadelphia’s Fairmount Park Art Association that joins artists and the city’s diverse communities in developing proposals for outdoor works of art.” – Heritage Preservation Page 2 (21)
  • New Land Marks is an ongoing program of the FPAA – Manayunk Stoop Press Release (16)
  • ”A nationally recognized model that brings together artists and community organizations to plan new works of public art in conjunction with ongoing community development, urban greening, public amenities, and other revitalization initiatives. These efforts celebrate community identity, commemorate ‘untold’ histories, and offer visionary, yet reasonable, ways to invigorate public spaces” – New Land Marks Exhibition Press Release (17)
  • “New Land Marks works with artists and communities to plan and create new works of public art. The program was conceived as a ‘public art laboratory’ to develop best practices for the field of public art and to support the work of artists in community contexts. It was selected for a 2002 Place Planning Award by the Environmental Design Research Association and Public Art Network’s 2004 Year in Review, a guide to the best U.S. public Art projects.” – Manayunk Stoops Press Release (16)
  • “…artists and communities were invited to respond to a novel ‘request to participate.’ Afterwards, they were matched with each other and given a year and the full backing of the association to create proposals. The process involved a tripartite contract between communities, artists and the association. Artists were obliged to engage in a serious dialogue with the communities they agreed to work with. In return, communities needed to commit to speaking through three official representatives who would advocate the artists’ ideas to other community members and city boards. For its part, the association promised to facilitate the entire process by providing resources, arranging professional consultations and eventually working to fund all projects which emerged from the development process.” – New Land Marks PDF (9)
  • “Eventually, sixteen projects did emerge and were chronicled in a book and an exhibition that was put up in community buildings throughout the city” – New Land Marks PDF (9)
  • “The Labor Monument: Philadelphiaʼs Tribute to the American Worker is the fifth project to be commissioned through this groundbreaking program.” – Labor Monument Press Release (14)
  • Sixteen proposals emerged – New Land Marks PDF (9). Five commissioned ones include: 1) Manyunk Stoops: Heart and Home (2006) by Diane Pieri, 2) I have a story to tell you…(2003) by Pepon Osario, 3) Common Ground (2009) by John Stone and Lonnie Graham in collaboration with Lorene Cary for Project H.O.M.E., 4) The Labor Monument: Philadelphia’s Tribute to the American Worker (2010) by John Kindness , and 5) Embodying Thoreau: Dwelling, Sitting, Watching (2003) by Ed Levine – Philly.com Article – NLM Commissions (18)

Form and Function

  • “In response to the apparent separation of public art from those it was intended to benefit, in 1980 the art association initiated the program Form and Function, inviting artists to propose public art projects that would be utilitarian, site-specific, and integral to community life” – Heritage Handbook (24) – adapted from Form and Function Book (8)
  • Form and Function was the FPAA’s “response to the gap between public art and ordinary life” – New Land Marks Book (2) pg 16
  • Form and Function is a landmark program and exhibition – Going Public (13) pg 26
  • The Art Association invited artists to propose projects that would be “utilitarian, site specific, and integral to community life – works that would be integrated into the public context through use as well as placement.” Artists were asked to “give meaning and identity to a place, to probe for its genius loci, or ‘spirit of the place.’ – New Land Marks Book (2) pg 16
  • Form and Function was also the FPAA’s contribution to Philadelphia’s Century IV celebration. – Form and Function Book (8) Intro
  • Form and Function was a program designed to commemorate the Tricentennial of the founding of Philadelphia in 1982. – Form and Function Book (8) pg 8
  • “Fourteen well-known contemporary artists were invited to submit proposals for specific sites throughout Philadelphia.” A selection of the proposed works were commissioned and installed. – Form and Function Book (8) Intro
  • The Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts participated by “mounting an exhibition of the models, drawings and photographs of what Theodore Newbold, in his Foreward, called “works in progress” – Form and Function Book (8) Intro
  • Form and Function Projects include: 1) Fingerspan (1987) by Jody Pinto 2) Pavilion in the Trees (1993) by Martin Puryear 3) El Gran Teatro de la Luna (1982) by Rafael Ferrer 4) Louis Kahn Lecture Room (1982) by Siah Armajani *** <- Need a reference for this list

THE ELLEN PHILLIPS SAMUEL MEMORIAL:

  • “The Ellen Phillips Samuel Memorial, located on Kelly Drive between Boat House Row and the Girard Avenue Bridge, was commissioned between 1933 and 1961 by the Fairmount Park Art Association through the bequest of philanthropist Ellen Phillip Samuel. Samuel’s wish was to create a series of sculptures along the Schuylkill River to commemorate the history of America and the people and aspirations that have formed it. The Memorial consists of three terraces and seventeen sculptures; the architectural terraces are constructed of Pennsylvania sandstone and Indiana limestone.” – Ellen Phillips Samuel Memorial PDF (Phila.gov link) (6)
  • “Ellen Phillips Samuel, a Philadelphian, had been a generous supporter of cultural matters throughout her life, and for many years an active member of the Fairmount Park Art Association. She died on October 1, 1913, leaving her estate, subject to a life interest in her husband, J. Bunford Samuel, and after substantial legacies to friends and Philadelphia institutions, to the Art Association, to apply the income in creating, on a 2,000-foot strip bordering the Schuylkill River, statuary ‘emblematical of the history of America – ranging in time from the earliest settlers of America to the present era. Following the death of his wife, Mr. Samuel expressed great interest in her project and during his life commissioned and had instated at the south end of the strip the standing figure of Thorfinn Karlsefni by the Icelandic sculptor Einar Jonsson. On his death in 1929 the generous fund totaling approximately $700,000, came into the possession of the Association to carry out the directions of Mrs. Samuel’s will. Under the administration of the Association, this bequest increased substantially. – Sculpture of a City (3)
  • “…Fairmount Park Art Association did not receive the monies, totaling about $700,000, until his death in 1929. Shortly thereafter, a committee made up of trustees of the association was formed and entrusted with the responsibility of carrying out the terms of Ellen Phillips Samuel’s will. After several years of planning and deliberation, the memorial committee approved a design for the site by the architect, Paul P. Cret. It called for the construction of three terraces, each containing two exedras, respectively. It was decided that six sculptures were required for the terrace, two large central pieces and four flanking figures to be placed on the exedras. In order to select six sculptors for the work, the Fairmount Park Art Association organized an international sculpture exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 1933. Heinz Warneke Book (10) pg 94
  • “In her will, the, Mrs. Samuel had requested that notices be placed in newspapers around the world, asking for designs and offering to pay shipping costs. In that spirit, the Art Association organized three international exhibitions to permit the Samuel Committee to review the field of contemporary sculpture and select artist who would represent the spirit of the times.” Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 95
  • “…the Art Association embarked on the ambitious program that would result in the commissioning of works by 16 artists over a period of almost thirty years.” Public Art in America (1) pg 5
  • “Hundreds of works were exhibited, examined, admired, and ridiculed at the three Sculpture Internationals sponsored by the Fairmount Park Art Association in 1933, 1940, and 1949. These exhibitions came about because Ellen Phillips Samuel (1849-1913) left her residuary estate in trust to the Art Association, specifying that the income be used to create a series of sculptures along the Schuylkill River “emblematical of the history of America – ranging in time from the earliest settlers of America to the present era.” – Public Art in America (1) pg 94
  • “In 1949, the third international exhibition was held to select artists for the third (and last) terrace. Attendance was extraordinary: over 250,000 people came to see the 252 works on exhibition. The event was widely covered in the national press, the caption accompanying a double-page photograph in Life magazine calling it ‘the world’s biggest sculpture show.’ Seventy visiting artists were photographed seated on the grand staircase of the Philadelphia Museum of Art” including Alexander Calder and Jacques Lipchitz. – Public Art in Philadelphia (1) pg 99

THE INTERNATIONAL SCULPTURE GARDEN:

  • “In the 1960s, the Fairmount Park Art Association conceived the idea of an International Sculpture Garden that would celebrate the impact of other cultures on the American experience. ‘Each individual piece,’ the Art Association noted, ‘should not only be typical of that nation’s heritage but should also be of the highest quality.’” – Public Art Philadelphia (1) pg 244
  • The International Sculpture Garden, located at Penn’s Landing (Delaware Avenue between Chestnut and Spruce Streets) was dedicated in 1976, and pieces in the garden include: 1) Spheres (300-1525, installed 1976), from Costa Rica, Artist unknown, 2) Five Water Spouts, Frog, and Lintel (12th-13th century, installed 1968), from Java, Indonesia, Artists unknown, 3) Nandi (c. 1500, installed 1976), from Madras, India, Artist unknown 4) Mangbusucks (c 1695, installed 1976), from Yangjoo-kun, kyunggi Province, Korea, Artist unknown, and 5) Central Post (c. 1850, installed 1980), from Alert Bay, Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Artist unknown – Public Art Philadelphia (1) pgs 244-245

Awards[edit]

  • FPAA named one of top ten places to see art enhance nature by USA TODAY
  • FPAA received AASLH Award of Merit in 2011
  • FPAA received the 2011 PNC Arts Alive Award for Arts Innovation in Honor of Peggy Amsterdam presented by the Arts and Business Council of Greater Philadelphia
  • FPAA received 2000 Award for Outstanding Commitment to the Preservation and Care of Collections from The American Institute for the Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works and Heritage Preservation

Sources[edit]


  1. Penny Balkin Bach Public Art in Philadelphia, Temple University Press, Philadelphia, 1992.
  2. Penny Balkin Bach, Editor New•Land•Marks: public art, community, and the meaning of place Grayson Publishing, Washington, DC, 2001.
  3. ) Fairmount Park Art Association Sculpture of a City: Philadelphia‘s Treasures in Bronze and Stone Walker Publisher Co., New York, 1974.
  4. ) PennPraxis for the William Penn Foundation Philadelphia’s Public Art: The Full Spectrum University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 2008.
  5. Associated Press Story (Museum Without Walls) [1] 2010
  6. Ellen Phillips Samuel Memorial PDF (Phila.gov link) [2] condition report only
  7. MWW Launch Event Press Release
  8. ) Fairmount Park Art Association Form and Function: Proposals for Public Art in Philadelphia The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and the Fairmount Park Art Association, Philadelphia, 1982.
  9. New Land Marks PDF – not sure about journal source [3] Places, October 2002, Design Observer
  10. Mary Mullen Cunningham Heinz Warneke, 1895-1983: a sculptor first and last
  11. Heritage Preservation Page 1 [4] good for basics
  12. ) Innovation Philadelphia blurb
  13. ) Jeffrey L. Cruikshank and Pam Korza Going Public: A Field Guide to Developments in Art in Public Places Arts Extension Service, Amherst, MA, 1988.
  14. ) Labor Monument Press Release
  15. ) MWW Press Release 1
  16. ) Manayunk Stoop Press Release
  17. ) New Land Marks Exhibition Press Release
  18. ) Philly.com Article – NLM Commissions [5] 5 projects 2000
  19. ) USA Today Article - "said to have more public art than any other city" 10/27/2011 [6]
  20. ) Pavilion in the Trees Philly.com Article treehouse 1993
  21. ) Heritage Preservation Page 2 [7]
  22. ) Common Ground Press Release
  23. ) MWW Press Release 2
  24. ) Heritage Handbook [8] SOS Handbook

“The Integrity of the Artist-Citizen” Penny Balkin Bach

Artworks[edit]

Puma by William Zorach, 1954. In the Azalea Garden, Fairmount Park.
FPAA medallion on back of the statue Puma.
Preacher by Waldemar Raemisch, 1952, at the Samuel Memorial.
Pegasus by Vincent Pilz at Memorial Hall.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Webster, Richard (1981). Philadelphia Preserved. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press. p. 226. ISBN 0877222150. 
  2. ^ "Board and Staff". FPAA official web site. Fairmount Park Art Alliance. 2010-05-23. Retrieved 2010-05-23. 
  3. ^ New Land Marks Book (2) pg 7
  4. ^ New Land Marks Book (2) pg 7
  5. ^ "Fairmount Park Art Association". Canary Promotion + Design. Archived from the original on 2010-05-23. Retrieved 2010-05-23. 
  6. ^ Salisbury, Stephan (2010-05-01). "$1.7 million for regional cultural organizations". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Philadelphia Media Holdings, LLC. Archived from the original on 2010-05-23. Retrieved 2010-05-23. "'...the Fairmount Park Art Association, $75,000, for a public-art marketing program.'" 

Category:Arts organizations based in the United States Category:Organizations based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Category:Public art in the United States