Beets!

User:Tom harrison/gravelpit

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainEaston, Matthew George (1897). "Psalms". Easton's Bible Dictionary (New and revised ed.). T. Nelson and Sons. 




This is a secret.

Possible references[edit]

Delacroix Liberty painting defaced in French museum - "French media quoted unnamed legal sources as saying the graffito was a clear reference to a 9/11 conspiracy theory."

Health effects[edit]

Survivors were covered in dust after the collapse of the towers

The hundreds of thousands of tons of toxic debris resulting from the collapse of the Twin Towers contained more than 2,500 contaminants, including known carcinogens.[1][2] Subsequent debilitating illnesses among rescue and recovery workers are said to be linked to exposure to these carcinogens.[3][4] The Bush administration ordered the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to issue reassuring statements regarding air quality in the aftermath of the attacks, citing national security, but the EPA did not determine that air quality had returned to pre-September 11 levels until June 2002.[5]

Health effects extended to residents, students, and office workers of Lower Manhattan and nearby Chinatown.[6] Several deaths have been linked to the toxic dust, and the victims' names were included in the World Trade Center memorial.[7] Approximately 18,000 people have been estimated to have developed illnesses as a result of the toxic dust.[8] There is also scientific speculation that exposure to various toxic products in the air may have negative effects on fetal development. A notable children's environmental health center is currently analyzing the children whose mothers were pregnant during the WTC collapse, and were living or working nearby.[9] A study of rescue workers released in April 2010 found that all those studied had impaired lung functions, and that 30–40% were reporting little or no improvement in persistent symptoms that started within the first year of the attack.[10]

Years after the attacks, legal disputes over the costs of illnesses related to the attacks were still in the court system. On October 17, 2006, a federal judge rejected New York City's refusal to pay for health costs for rescue workers, allowing for the possibility of numerous suits against the city.[11] Government officials have been faulted for urging the public to return to lower Manhattan in the weeks shortly after the attacks. Christine Todd Whitman, administrator of the EPA in the aftermath of the attacks, was heavily criticized by a U.S. District Judge for incorrectly saying that the area was environmentally safe.[12] Mayor Giuliani was criticized for urging financial industry personnel to return quickly to the greater Wall Street area.[13]

On December 22, 2010, the United States Congress passed the James L. Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act, which President Barack Obama signed into law on January 2, 2011. This act allocated $4.2 billion to create the World Trade Center Health Program, which provides testing and treatment for people suffering from long-term health problems related to the 9/11 attacks.[14][15] The WTC Health Program replaced preexisting 9/11-related health programs such as the Medical Monitoring and Treatment Program and the WTC Environmental Health Center program.[15]


[16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gates, Anita (September 11, 2006). "Buildings Rise from Rubble while Health Crumbles". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-09-04. 
  2. ^ "What was Found in the Dust". New York Times. September 5, 2006. Retrieved 2011-09-04. 
  3. ^ "New York: 9/11 toxins caused death". CNN.com. May 24, 2007. Archived from the original on June 18, 2007. Retrieved 2011-09-04. 
  4. ^ DePalma, Anthony (May 13, 2006). "Tracing Lung Ailments That Rose With 9/11 Dust". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-09-04. 
  5. ^ Heilprin, John (June 23, 2003). "White House edited EPA's 9/11 reports". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Retrieved 2011-09-04. 
  6. ^ "Updated Ground Zero Report Examines Failure of Government to Protect Citizens". Sierra Club. 2006. Retrieved 2011-09-04. 
  7. ^ Smith, Stephen (April 28, 2008). "9/11 "Wall Of Heroes" To Include Sick Cops". CBS News. Retrieved 2011-09-04. 
  8. ^ Shukman, David (September 1, 2011). "Toxic dust legacy of 9/11 plagues thousands of people". BBC News. Retrieved September 11, 2011. 
  9. ^ "CCCEH Study of the Effects of 9/11 on Pregnant Women and Newborns" (PDF). World Trade Center Pregnancy Study. Columbia University. 2006. Retrieved 2011-09-04. 
  10. ^ Grady, Denise (April 7, 2010). "Lung Function of 9/11 Rescuers Fell, Study Finds". New York Times. Retrieved 2011-09-04. 
  11. ^ DePalma, Anthony (October 18, 2006). "Many Ground Zero Workers Gain Chance at Lawsuits". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-09-04. 
  12. ^ Neumeister, Larry (February 2, 2006). "Judge Slams Ex-EPA Chief Over Sept. 11". San Francisco Chronicle. Associated Press. Archived from the original on May 24, 2008. Retrieved 2011-09-04. 
  13. ^ Smith, Ben (September 18, 2006). "Rudy's black cloud. WTC health risks may hurt Prez bid". Daily News (New York). Retrieved 2015-04-04. 
  14. ^ "Bloomberg urges passage of 9/11 health bill". CNN. December 20, 2010. 
  15. ^ a b "World Trade Center Health Program FAQ". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 2 July 2012. 
  16. ^ "James Zadroga 9/11 Health & Compensation Act set signed by President Obama in quiet ceremony". New York Daily News. Retrieved 2012-08-09.