User:TraceyR/MyMemos

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templates[edit]

{{cite journal
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Named references in article:

<ref name=named_ref/>
<ref name=named_ref>details of named reference</ref>

{{cite web
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example

{{cite web
  | last =Wise
  | first =JA.
  | authorlink =
  | coauthors = Morin RJ, Sanderson R, Blum K
  | title = Changes in plasma carotenoid, alpha-tocopherol, and lipid peroxide levels in response to supplementation with concentrated fruit and vegetable extracts: A pilot study
  | work =
  | publisher = Schwebebad Dresden GbR
  | date =1996
  | url = http://www.schwebebad-dresden.de/download/ctrstudie.pdf
  | format =
  | doi =
  | accessdate = 2007-02-09 }}

{{cite book
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example

{{cite book
  | last = Barnes C.H. & James D.N
  | first =
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  | title =Shorts Aircraft since 1900
  | publisher =Putnam
  | year =
  | location =London (1989)
  | pages =560
  | url =
  | doi =
  | isbn = 0-85177-819-4}} 

Barnes C.H. & James D.N. Shorts Aircraft since 1900. London (1989): Putnam. p. 560. ISBN 0-85177-819-4. 


{{cite encyclopedia
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{{cite news 
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Conversion templates[edit]

"aircraft project" extract (talk) Hello! This is to announce that several templates for automatic convertion between metric and imperial units and for displaying consistently formatted output have been created: {{km to mi}}, {{mi to km}}, {{m to ft}}, {{ft to m}}, {{km2 to mi2}}, {{mi2 to km2}}, {{m2 to ft2}}, and {{ft2 to m2}}. Hopefully, they will be useful to the participants of this WikiProject. The templates are all documented, provide parameters to fine-tune the output, and can be substituted if necessary.

Also, pounds to kilograms {{convert|number|lb|kg}}, e.g. 55 pounds (25 kg). Others at Conversion templates.

Examples:

"Two {{convert|20|ft|m}} circumference brake parachutes and 
one {{convert|20|ft|m}} anti-spin parachute were housed in 
the rear fuselage above the jet pipe."

"Two 20 feet (6.1 m) circumference brake parachutes and one 20 feet (6.1 m) anti-spin parachute were housed in the rear fuselage above the jet pipe."

"Length {{convert|2000|ft|m}}" - thousands separators added

"Length 2,000 feet (610 m)"

"{{convert|12000|lb|kg}}" - no thousands separators

"12,000 pounds (5,400 kg)"

Tools[edit]

  1. Disambig links: Dablinks
  2. WP:DEADREF: Checklinks
  3. Alt text on image: Altviewer

Notes[edit]

conversion templates not suitable for use within specifications template (see empty/loaded weight entries)

Work in (slow!) progress

Short-Kawanishi KF1 (Kawanishi H3K) sources

text H3K, Kawanishi

      Reconaissance flying boat. The prototype was built by the British Short
      Brothers company. The H3K was a big biplane with the engines in
      gondolas between the wings.
      Type: H3K1
      Function: reconaissance
      Year:   Crew: 8-9  Engines: 3 * 825hp R.R. Buzzard
      Speed: 225km/h  Ceiling:   Range: 9h
      Armament: 6*mg7.62mm


timeline April 9 The world’s largest all-metal flying boat, the Short Brothers K.F.1, undergoes trials over Osaka Bay under a secret arrangement with the Imperial Japanese Navy. Powered by three 825-hp Rolls-Royce Buzzard engines, the aircraft spans 101 ft 10 in. and stretches 74 ft 5 in. Kawanishi Aircraft of Kobe holds the construction license for Short metal flying boats. The Aeroplane, April 15, 1931, p. 660; Short Brothers, general file, National Air and Space Museum.

Friedrich Files The FriedrichFiles - Kawanishi H3K2: licence built Short S.15; first & second in service in 1932, third and fourth in service 1933 Also: S.15: 8x0,762 MG; 1000 kg bombs; maritime reconnaissance 1930 in service with IJN; as Kawanishi K.F.1 Navy Type 90-2

Rangoon? K.F.1: 1 - Short Brothers, 4 - Kawanishi, Japan


[1] Kawanishi (Navy Type 90-2 Flying Boat) H3K (Japan) Reconaissance flying boat. The prototype was built by the British Short Brothers company, and was based on the Calcutta and Rangoon series. The H3K was a big biplane with the engines in gondolas between the wings. Type: H3K1 Function: reconaissance Year: Crew: 8-9 Engines: 3 * 825hp R.R. Buzzard Speed: 225km/h Ceiling: Range: 9h Armament: 6*mg7.62mm


with picture Designed in the early 1930s, the H3K1 was already phased out of service by the mid-1930s. Five examples were built under license from an English design, using components mostly acquired from England, including the three imported 825hp Rolls-Royce Buzzard engines that each aircraft used. Experience with this design helped Kawanishi in later years when they manufactured the large H6K and H8K flying boats that were used extensively during the war. At the beginning of the war, however, lack of intelligence on the H3K led the Allies to believe that it was still in service, and so it was assigned the codename "Belle".

Kawanishi H3K1 Type 90-2

Type: Flying Boat Service: Japanese Naval Air Force (JNAF) Reference: Mikesh: 32

Specifications: n/a


more text H3K, Kawanishi 'Belle' (Navy Type 90-2 Flying Boat)

      Reconaissance flying boat, a big biplane with the engines
      in gondolas between the wings. The prototype was built by
      the British Short Brothers company, and was based on the
      {Calcutta} and {Rangoon} series. H3Ks were powered by imported
      engines. They were retired before the outbreak of
      WWII.
      Type: H3K1
      Function: reconaissance
      Year:   Crew: 8-9  Engines: 3 * 825hp R.R. Buzzard
      Speed: 225km/h  Ceiling:   Range: 9h
      Armament: 6*mg7.62mm




Misc[edit]

  • "Highball" 25 Oct '45 MAEE Helensburgh, Duns


  • Symbol support vote.svg Support

Also this year... The Short No.3 becomes the first aeroplane to be designed with a retractable undercarriage.

18 September The Short S39 Triple Twin aircraft, flown by Francis McClean in Kent, becomes the first aeroplane to fly with three propellers.

11 October The first 'safe' aeroplane, the Short Tandem Twin or Gnome Sandwich, is flown for the first time. Either of its two engines could be switched off during flight.

British Military Aviation in 1912 Service Aircraft 10 January Lieutenant Charles Rumney Samson makes the first take-off from a ship when he pilots a Short S38 from a specially built wooden platform on board the battleship HMS Africa on the River Medway in Kent (first from 'moving' ship?)

Also this year... Gordon Bell becomes the first professional test pilot for the Short Brothers at Eastchurch.

17 July The Royal Navy accepts the Short brothers' Folder seaplane and assigns it to HMS Hermes at Sheerness.

9 May Using a bombsight developed by Bourdillon and Tizard, a British Short 184 seaplane hits a target in with a 500 pound bomb from a height of 4,000 feet.

  • first torpedo lauch (trial)
  • first ship torpedoed (see 184?)

Specifications[edit]

General characteristics

Performance

External links[edit]

KG 200[edit]

This novel, contains an appendix (p.314 in the Pan Books edition) listing "aircraft known to have been regularly flown by" KG 200. These are:

  1. Boeing B-17s (Flying Fortresses)
  2. B-24 Liberators
  3. Vickers Wellingtons
  4. Short Stirlings
  5. Supermarine Spitfires
  6. De Havilland Mosquitos
  7. Bristol Beaufighters
  8. P-51 Mustangs
  9. Lockheed P-38 Lightnings
  10. Lockheed Hudsons
  11. Douglas DC-3s

This aircraft is listed in the appendix to the novel ''KG 200'' as one flown by the German secret operations unit [[Kampfgeschwader 200|KG 200]], which tested, evaluated and sometimes clandestinely operated captured enemy aircraft during [[World War II]]. <ref>Gilman and Clive 1978, p.314.</ref> *Gilman J.D. and J. Clive. ''KG 200''. London: Pan Books Ltd., 1978. ISBN 0-85177-819-4. ;{{flag|Germany|Nazi}} * [[Kampfgeschwader 200|KG 200]]<ref name= "Gilman and Clive 1978, p. 314"/>

 Germany



References[edit]