User:Typhoon2013/2014 Pacific typhoon season

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Typhoon2013/2014 Pacific typhoon season
2014 Pacific typhoon season summary.png
Season summary map
Seasonal boundaries
First system formed January 10, 2014
Last system dissipated January 2, 2015
Strongest storm
Name Vongfong
 • Maximum winds 215 km/h (130 mph)
(10-minute sustained)
 • Lowest pressure 898 hPa (mbar)
Seasonal statistics
Total depressions 33
Total storms 23
Typhoons 11
Super typhoons 7 (Unofficial)
Total fatalities 411 total
Total damage $8.96 billion (2014 USD)
Pacific typhoon seasons
2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016

The 2014 Pacific typhoon season is an ongoing event in the annual cycle of tropical cyclone formation, in which tropical cyclones form in the western Pacific Ocean. The season will run throughout 2014, though most tropical cyclones typically develop between May and October. The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean to the north of the equator between 100°E and 180th meridian. Within the northwestern Pacific Ocean, there are two separate agencies that assign names to tropical cyclones which can often result in a cyclone having two names. The Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) will name a tropical cyclone should it be judged to have 10-minute sustained wind speeds of at least 65 km/h (40 mph) anywhere in the basin, whilst the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) assigns names to tropical cyclones which move into or form as a tropical depression in their area of responsibility located between 135°E and 115°E and between 5°N–25°N regardless of whether or not a tropical cyclone has already been given a name by the JMA. Tropical depressions that are monitored by the United States' Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) are given a number with a "W" suffix.

Seasonal forecasts[edit]

During each season, several national meteorological services and scientific agencies forecast how many tropical cyclones, tropical storms, and typhoons will form during a season and/or how many tropical cyclones will affect a particular country.[1] These agencies include the Tropical Storm Risk (TSR) Consortium of the University College London, Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) and the Taiwan's Central Weather Bureau.[1][2][3] During October 2013, the VNCHMF predicted that one to two tropical cyclones would develop and possibly affect Vietnam between November 2013 and April 2014.[4]

Season summary[edit]

Storms[edit]

Tropical Storm Lingling (Agaton)[edit]

Tropical storm (JMA)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Lingling 2014-01-18 0210Z.jpg Lingling 2014 track.png
Duration January 10 – January 20
Peak intensity 65 km/h (40 mph) (10-min)  994 hPa (mbar)

A broad low pressure area formed on January 3. It was then classified as a disturbance by the JTWC on January 5, with favorable conditions of forming into a tropical depression in the next few days. On January 10, the JMA reported that a tropical depression had formed southwest of Palau.[5][6] The JMA then downgraded it to a low pressure area on January 12, as it affected the Philippines.[7][8] On January 14, JMA reupgraded this system to tropical depression again.[9] The PAGASA then named the system Agaton early on January 17.[10] The next day, its circulation became a bit exposed as it intensifies into a tropical storm by the JMA, naming it Lingling.[11] The JTWC upgraded it to a tropical depression, giving the designation 01W later that day.[12]

Floods and landslides killed 42 people in the Philippines.[13]

Tropical Storm Kajiki (Basyang)[edit]

Tropical storm (JMA)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Kajiki Jan 31 2014 0440Z.jpg Kajiki 2014 track.png
Duration January 27 – February 1
Peak intensity 65 km/h (40 mph) (10-min)  999 hPa (mbar)

One week after the first storm of 2014 dissipated, the JMA reported that another tropical depression had formed east of Yap on January 29.[14][15] Due to warm waters, the system organized and strengthened into Tropical Depression 02W by the JTWC on January 30. The next day, both the JMA and PAGASA upgraded it to a tropical storm, naming it Kajiki by the JMA and Basyang by PAGASA. The JTWC upgraded this storm to a tropical storm later that day, as it slowly intensified with convection.[16][17] According to PAGASA the storm made landfall over Siargao Island on January 31.[18] Due to the unfavorable conditions in the South China Sea, Kajiki dissipated late on February 1.[19][20]

During its lifecycle, Kajiki killed 6 people in the Philippines.[21]

Typhoon Faxai[edit]

Typhoon (JMA)
Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
Faxai Mar 4 2014 0305Z.jpg Faxai 2014 track.png
Duration February 27 – March 5
Peak intensity 120 km/h (75 mph) (10-min)  976 hPa (mbar)

Late on February 15, a tropical disturbance was spotted near Chuuk, near the equator and was later designated as Invest 93W, in which is moving slowly in an area of high vertical wind shear.[22] Upon moving in an area of lower vertical wind shear, the storm was able to consolidate and organize. On February 27, the disturbance was upgraded to tropical depression status by the Japan Meteorological Agency and was given a Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center. The following day, it was upgraded by the JTWC to a tropical depression and designated as 03W.[23] Several hours later, the JMA upgraded the system to a tropical storm and named it Faxai.[24] Faxai started rapidly intensifying into a severe tropical storm, then a typhoon for a short period of time on March 4.[25] The system became extratropical on March 6,[26] before it fully dissipated several thousands of kilometers southeast of Japan, late on March 8.[citation needed]

Tropical Depression 04W (Caloy)[edit]

Tropical depression (JMA)
Tropical depression (SSHWS)
JMA TD 5 Mar 21 2014 0220Z.jpg Caloy 2014 track.png
Duration March 19 – March 27
Peak intensity <55 km/h (35 mph) (10-min)  1005 hPa (mbar)

On March 12, a tropical disturbance formed southeast of Guam.[27] Early on March 18, the JMA reported that it had intensified to a tropical depression, which had developed about 395 km (245 mi) east-northeast of Koror, Palau.[28] Over the next few days, the system became more organised and it was named Caloy by PAGASA on March 21. Late on March 22, the system was designated as 04W by the JTWC. Due to less convection and land reaction on March 24, the system was downgraded to a disturbance and dissipated later that day. The remnants continued to move westward towards the South China Sea, before dissipating completely to the southwest of Vietnam on March 27.[citation needed]

Tropical Storm Peipah (Domeng)[edit]

Tropical storm (JMA)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Peipah Apr 05 2014 0440Z.jpg Peipah 2014 track.png
Duration April 2 – April 9
Peak intensity 65 km/h (40 mph) (10-min)  997 hPa (mbar)

On March 30, a cluster of thunderstorms formed near the equator and Papua New Guinea. The large cluster separated into Tropical Cyclone Ita and a tropical disturbance. It intensified into a tropical depression on April 2[29][30] and strengthened into 05W by the JTWC the next day.[31] The next day, convection built up and the system intensified into a tropical storm, prompting the JMA to name it Peipah.[32] Early on April 9, Peipah weakened to a tropical depression.[33] Later on April 10, the JMA declared that Peipah had dissipated as the JTWC classifies that it is still a tropical depression. The JTWC made its final warning on Peipah later that day, as the storm's remnants continued to move northwest slowly towards the eastern Philippines.[citation needed]

Severe Tropical Storm Tapah[edit]

Severe tropical storm (JMA)
Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
Tapah Apr 29 2014 0355Z.jpg Tapah 2014 track.png
Duration April 27 – May 2
Peak intensity 95 km/h (60 mph) (10-min)  982 hPa (mbar)

Early on April 27, the JMA reported that a tropical depression had formed about 515 km (320 mi) south-southeast of Hagåtña, Guam.[34][35] Later that day, the JTWC upgraded it to Tropical Depression 06W as it moved north.[36] Due to warm waters, the system rapidly intensified into a tropical storm with the JMA naming it Tapah on April 28.[37] Later that day, convection occurred and the system was upgraded to a severe tropical storm.[38] Early on April 29, the JTWC upgraded Tapah into a minimal typhoon, but the JMA upgraded it to a typhoon.[39] It weakened back to a tropical storm late on April 30.[40] On May 2, the JMA downgraded Tapah to a depression due to a very exposed circulation. Later on the same day, the remnants of Tapah were absorbed by a developing extratropical system.[41]

Tropical Storm Mitag (Ester)[edit]

Tropical storm (JMA)
Subtropical storm (SSHWS)
Mitag Jun 11 2014 0205Z.jpg Mitag 2014 track.png
Duration June 9 – June 12
Peak intensity 75 km/h (45 mph) (10-min)  997 hPa (mbar)

Late on June 6, a low-pressure area formed near the island of Guandong, China, embedded from the monsoon trough. The next day, the system slowly moved in an eastward direction.[citation needed] Early on June 9, the JMA reported that it intensified into a tropical depression which had developed about 115 km (71 mi) to the south-southeast of Hengchun, Taiwan.[42] On June 10, PAGASA named the system Ester, as it brought flooding to the Philippines.[43][44] On the night of the next day, convection increased to the system as the JMA upgraded to Tropical Storm Mitag.[45] In the same time, the JTWC classified it as subtropical.[46] Very early on June 12, the JMA issued its final advisory on Mitag, as the system was absorbed by a developing extratropical cyclone located north of Japan.[citation needed]

Due to the southwest monsoon enhanced by Tropical Storm Mitag bringing rains to the Philippines, PAGASA reported that the official rainy season started on June 10.[47][48]

Tropical Storm Hagibis[edit]

Tropical storm (JMA)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Hagibis Jun 14 2014 0240Z.jpg Hagibis 2014 track.png
Duration June 13 – June 18
Peak intensity 75 km/h (45 mph) (10-min)  993 hPa (mbar)

Similar to the formation of Mitag, a small circulation started to develop in the South China Sea, late on June 8. Early on June 11, the system was upgraded to a tropical disturbance. On June 13, the JMA classified the storm as a tropical depression, as it started to move slowly towards the northeast. Early on June 14, the JTWC issued a TCFA alert on the tropical depression. Later that day, the JTWC upgraded the storm to Tropical Depression 07W, and at the same time, the JMA upgraded it to a tropical storm, naming it Hagibis.[citation needed] Early on June 15, Hagibis made landfall over southern China.[49] During the next day, both agencies stopped issuing warnings on the system, as it rapidly weakened to a tropical depression over land. Its remnants still continued to move northward, by on June 17, the remnants of Hagibis curved eastwards, as it re-generated into a tropical storm. As a result, the JMA reinitiated advisories on Hagibis. Early on June 18, Hagibis transitioned into an extratropical cyclone. On June 21, the remnants of the storm were absorbed by another developing extratropical cyclone to the north.[citation needed]

About 13,000 people were affected by the storm.[50][51] Economic losses from Hagibis reached a total of 577 million yuan ($93 million USD). Two days later, it was topped to 675 million yuan ($103.3 million USD),[52] and reached a total of $131 million as of June 20.[53][54] As of June 19, the Chinese Government had reported that there were 11 casualties in regions affected by Hagibis.[55]

Typhoon Neoguri (Florita)[edit]

Typhoon (JMA)
Category 5 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Neoguri 2014-07-07 0455Z.jpg Neoguri 2014 track.png
Duration July 2 – July 11
Peak intensity 175 km/h (110 mph) (10-min)  928 hPa (mbar)

A weak tropical disturbance formed near Guam on June 30.[56] On July 1, it further intensified due to warm sea-surface temperatures and convection, as it was upgraded to a tropical depression late on July 2. The next day, it was classified as Tropical Depression 08W by JTWC.[57] Early on July 4, it was upgraded to a tropical storm by the both agencies, with the latter naming it as Neoguri.[58] Later that day, Neoguri rapidly intensified into a minimal typhoon. Early on July 5, it once again rapidly intensified and was upgraded to Category 4 status by the JTWC as the eye developed clearly. In the same time, the storm entered the PAR, with PAGASA giving the name Florita. Late the next day, Neoguri still entered an area of very warm sea temperatures as it intensified into a super typhoon by the JTWC and reached peak intensity early on July 7[59], without the JTWC upgrading it as a Category 5 status. Early on July 8, Neoguri weakened to a Category 3 typhoon.[60] and PAGASA stated that the storm had exited their area later that day.[61] Late the next day, Neoguri further weakens to a severe tropical storm by the JMA. Due to the strong jet stream, Neoguri moved in an eastward direction instead moving towards Korea. On July 10, JMA downgraded the system to a tropical storm as the JTWC made their final warning and stopped issuing advisories. In the same time, Neoguri's circulation became totally exposed as it was affecting southern Japan. JMA made their final warning early on July 11, as Neoguri started to become extratropical.[citation needed]

After Neoguri's landfall, 7 people were reported dead and nearly 50 were injured.[62]

Typhoon Rammasun (Glenda)[edit]

Typhoon (JMA)
Category 4 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Rammasun Jul 18 2014 0535Z.jpg Rammasun 2014 track.png
Duration July 10 – July 20
Peak intensity 165 km/h (105 mph) (10-min)  939 hPa (mbar)

The ITCZ spawned a tropical disturbance late on July 9.[citation needed] Similar to its predecessor Neoguri, the system showed signs of intensification due to strong convection and warm waters.[63] The next day, both the JMA and JTWC classified it as a weak tropical depression, designating it as 09W. Early on July 11, JTWC upgraded the depression to a tropical storm, and tropical storm warnings were issued in Guam.[64][65] On the night of the same day, JTWC downgraded 09W to a tropical depression as it passed through Guam, entering an area of favorable conditions and low vertical windshear on July 12.[66] Later that day, the JMA had upgraded it to Tropical Storm Rammasun.[67] Tracking westward at over 15 knots (28 km/h; 17 mph), the system's convective banding became more persistent.[68]

As of July 17, it is reported from NDRRMC that the death toll has reached 40. Also, the total amount of damages were amounted to 1 billion ($27 million USD).[69]

Typhoon Matmo (Henry)[edit]

Typhoon (JMA)
Category 2 typhoon (SSHWS)
Matmo 2014-07-22 0510Z.jpg Matmo 2014 track.png
Duration July 15 – July 25
Peak intensity 150 km/h (90 mph) (10-min)  957 hPa (mbar)

Late on July 13, the Intertropical Convergence Zone spawned another tropical disturbance.[70] But due to Typhoon Rammasun being nearby, the disturbance started to weaken. The next day, it gathered warm waters and favorable conditions.[citation needed] Very early on July 16, the JMA upgraded the system to a weak tropical depression, as it started to show signs of intensification. At the same time, the JTWC issued a TCFA alert on the system.[71][72] The next day, the JTWC upgraded the system to Tropical Storm 10W, while the JMA named the system Matmo, after it strengthened to a tropical storm.[citation needed] Early on July 18, Matmo entered the PAR, with PAGASA giving it the name Henry.[73] On July 19, the JMA upgraded the system to a severe tropical storm. During the next day, Matmo began to slowly intensify to a typhoon. The JTWC, on the other hand, still classified the system as a tropical storm. Later that day, the JTWC upgraded it to a Category 1 typhoon. At the same time, Matmo curved towards the northwest.[74] Late on July 22, the JMA downgraded Matmo to a severe tropical storm. Early the next day, the JTWC instead upgraded Matmo to a Category 2, as the storm reintensified. With that, a small unclear eye developed in Matmo's center.[75]

One person was reported dead and there was some damage reported.[76] At least 48 people died in a plane crash in the Taiwan strait, the crash may have been caused by the typhoon.[77] As of July 24, according to the Yilan County Government, the agricultural damage in the county was estimated at about NT$44 million ($1.5 million USD).[78]

Severe Tropical Storm Nakri (Inday)[edit]

Severe tropical storm (JMA)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Nakri Aug 02 2014 0455Z.jpg Nakri 2014 track.png
Duration July 24 – August 4
Peak intensity 100 km/h (65 mph) (10-min)  983 hPa (mbar)

On July 19, a tropical depression formed to the southeast of Guam.[79] It slowly moved in a northwest direction over the next few days.[80] Early on July 22, the JTWC issued a TCFA Alert, but later that day, the system lost its organization, and was downgraded to a low pressure area.[81] [82] Early on July 24, the low-pressure area re-formed east of Palau.[83] JMA upgraded the system to a tropical depression early on July 26,[84] as it started to move in a northward direction. The depression continued to intensify, even though it didn't reach tropical storm strength. Due to weakening convection east of the storm's center, it started to weaken on July 28.[citation needed] Later that day, more convection increased in the western side of the storm, and it began to reintensify. On July 29, the JMA upgraded the system to Tropical Storm Nakri. The JTWC, on the other hand, still classified it as a disturbance or monsoonal depression, even while deep convection was occurring in Nakri.[85] Due to the deep pressure of Nakri, the JMA upgraded it to a severe tropical storm on July 31. Early the next day, the JTWC issued its final advisory, without upgrading the system to a tropical depression. On August 2, the JTWC re-issued some advisories of Nakri, and was reported having winds at 35 kts as a tropical storm, and was given the designation 12W.[citation needed]

Typhoon Halong (Jose)[edit]

Typhoon (JMA)
Category 5 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Halong Aug 02 2014 0145Z.jpg Halong 2014 track.png
Duration July 28 – August 11
Peak intensity 195 km/h (120 mph) (10-min)  918 hPa (mbar)

On July 26, the JMA began to monitor a low-pressure area near Chuuk. After the system stalled for a few days, it was upgraded to a tropical depression on July 27. Early on July 29, the depression showed signs of intensification and with that, the JTWC upgraded it to Tropical Storm 11W. Later that day, the JMA upgraded 11W to Tropical Storm Halong.[86][87] At the same time, Halong started developing a small, unclear eye.[88] Around this time, gale and typhoon force winds were reported over Guam.[89] For over 24 hours, Halong's intensification stalled due to unfavorable upper-level winds and strong vertical wind shear. Very late on July 30, JMA upgraded Halong to a severe tropical storm, as the storm resumed its intensification. During the next day, both agencies upgraded Halong to a minimal typhoon. At the same time, Halong started undergoing rapid deepening.[90] On August 2, Halong's developed a clearer eye, and then it intensified to a Category 2 typhoon in less than 24 hours.[91][92] At the same day, due to excellent equatorial outflow and favorable conditions, it rapidly intensified into a Category 5 super typhoon. At the same time, PAGASA had reported that Halong had entered their area of responsibility, and assigned it the the name Jose.[93] On August 4, Halong underwent an eyewall replacement cycle and consequently, it weakened to a Category 4 typhoon.[94]Cite error: A <ref> tag is missing the closing </ref> (see the help page). Later that day, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) upgraded the system to a Category 5 super typhoon.[95] Genevieve entered an area of favorable conditions and low vertical windshear, as it continued to intensify. Later on August 7, Genevieve reached its peak intensity, with winds of 110 knots (205 km/h; 125 mph)*, and with this, it became the strongest storm within the Northwest Pacific in 2014.[96] On August 9, Genevieve started to move in a northward direction, towards low to moderate vertical windshear.[97] Later that day, the JTWC downgraded the system to a category 3 typhoon.[98] Later that day, Genevieve rapidly weakened to a strong Category 2 typhoon, as it began to encounter increasing windshear and drier inflow, to the south of the system. At the same time, the eye of the typhoon began to shrink.[99][100] On August 10, Genevieve weakened to a minimal typhoon, as it began to develop a secondary eye, but the secondary eye soon disappeared, due to the storm moving over cooler waters.[101] Both agencies downgraded the system to a severe tropical storm later that day, and rapidly weakening to a minimal tropical storm on August 11. Later that day, Genevieve started to lose its identity, and showed a bit of subtropical characteristics. With this, JTWC issued their final advisory on the storm. However, JMA tracked Genevieve until August 14, as it interacted with a high-pressure area.[citation needed]

Typhoon Fengshen[edit]

Typhoon (JMA)
Category 1 typhoon (SSHWS)
Fengshen Sept 7 2014 0910Z.jpg Fengshen 2014 track.png
Duration September 2 – September 10
Peak intensity 130 km/h (80 mph) (10-min)  976 hPa (mbar)

An area of convectional cloudiness persisted near Palau on the end of August.[102] On September 1, it was dubbed into a disturbance and had entered an area of favorable environments of developing further in the next couple of days. The disturbance wandered in the west Philippine Sea and moved northwards, while intensifying. On September 5, JMA upgraded it to a tropical depression. The next day, JTWC issued a TCFA Alert, as it steadily intensifies with enough convection and still favorable conditions. During September 7, JMA upgraded it to Tropical Storm Fengshen, as JTWC designates it as 13W.[citation needed][citation needed]

Tropical Depression 14W (Karding)[edit]

Tropical depression (JMA)
Tropical depression (SSHWS)
Karding Sept 6 2014 1400Z.jpg Karding 2014 track.png
Duration September 4 – September 9
Peak intensity 55 km/h (35 mph) (10-min)  999 hPa (mbar)

A low-pressure area collided with an area of convection occurred on September 1, and was upgraded into a tropical disturbance. Although it was with convection, it stayed weak due to the other tropical depression east to it. It began affecting the Philippines on September 3, with hail reported in Compostela Valley.[103] JMA classified the system as a LPA the next day and shifted to the South China Sea. On September 5, JMA upgraded it to a minor tropical depression. The next day, JTWC issued a TCFA Alert while JMA has this as a full tropical depression in favorable conditions. Late the same day, PAGASA named the depression, Karding. JTWC classified it as Tropical Depression 14W on September 7, due to strong banding clouds surrounding the center. Although this did not continue as JMA made their final warning due to the large amount of disorganization.[104][105]

Typhoon Kalmaegi (Luis)[edit]

Typhoon (JMA)
Category 3 typhoon (SSHWS)
Kalmaegi Sept 15 2014 0515Z.jpg Kalmaegi 2014 track.png
Duration September 10 – September 17
Peak intensity 130 km/h (80 mph) (10-min)  958 hPa (mbar)

On September 10, a tropical disturbance forms northeast of Palau with a possibility of becoming a tropical cyclone in the next few days.[106] Later the same day, the JTWC had reported that it had intensified into a tropical depression, giving the designation "15W". Early on September 12, the JMA finally started to track 15W as a tropical depression. In the same time, PAGASA had issued their first advisories on the storm, naming it as Tropical Depression Luis.[107][108] As Luis entered a more conducive environment, it had steadily intensified into a tropical storm and was named Kalmaegi by the JMA later that day and the JTWC followed suit on the same day.[109] The storm entered an area of warm waters as the JMA upgraded it to a typhoon, while JTWC upgraded it to a category 1 typhoon late on September 13. Kalmaegi made landfall over Cagayan early the next day, as it start to interact with land and weakened to a tropical storm. On September 15, Kalmaegi entered the South China Sea and intensified again.[110] Although, Kalmaegi intensified with a deep pressure. The typhoon reached its peak strength, while making its second landfall over Hainan Island.[111] Kalmaegi rapidly weakened to a large tropical storm as it continued to move in a westward direction. Both agencies classified Kalmaegi as a tropical depression and had dissipated later that day.[112]

The storm's remnants moved towards the 100th meridian east and was located over Eastern India which brought landslides and flash floods. A total of 12 people were reported dead due to this.[113] It finally dissipated on September 23, as it was absorbed by a tail-end of a front.

Severe Tropical Storm Fung-wong (Mario)[edit]

Severe tropical storm (JMA)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Fung-wong Sept 20 2014 0535Z.jpg Fung-wong 2014 track.png
Duration September 17 – September 24
Peak intensity 100 km/h (65 mph) (10-min)  988 hPa (mbar)

Late on September 13, an area of convectional cloudiness persisted near the same position where Kalmaegi formed. The next day, JTWC upgraded it as a tropical disturbance. The system entered an area of moderate vertical windshear and towards warm waters, as it was upgraded into a tropical depression by the JMA on September 16. On September 17, the depression moved into the Philippine Area of Responsibility and was given the name, Mario.[114] Later the same day, JTWC classified it as Tropical Depression 16W. As vertical windshear decreased around the storm system, it gathered more strength. With this, JMA classified it as a tropical storm, naming it Fung-wong on September 18.[115] Fung-wong maintained its intensity while affecting Luzon. The storm made landfall in the night of the next day over the northern tip of Cagayan.[116] Early on September 20, JMA upgraded it to severe tropical storm strength, although it failed to intensify and reached its peak strength later that day. However, it was recorded colder cloud tops surrounding the center is still bringing heavy rainfall over northern Philippines.[117] The storm made landfall on the shores of the southeastern part of Taiwan the next day. Fung-wong later weakened due to land reaction. Late on September 22, Fung-wong encountered some moderate vertical windshear and approached Eastern China.[118] Both agencies downgraded Fung-wong to a tropical storm, just as it was making landfall over Shanghai on September 23.[119] On September 24, Fung-wong started to interact with a frontal system. Later on the same day, the JMA issued their final advisory on the system, stating that it had become extratropical.[120]

Just like Karding, it was reported hail in Makati on September 18, due to the western outflow and thunderstorms of Fung-wong.[121] Severe flooding has occurred in many places in Luzon, especially Manila following the aftermath of Typhoon Kalmaegi.[122]

Severe Tropical Storm Kammuri[edit]

Severe tropical storm (JMA)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Kammuri Sept 26 2014 0320Z.jpg Kammuri 2014 track.png
Duration September 22 – September 30
Peak intensity 100 km/h (65 mph) (10-min)  984 hPa (mbar)

Similar to the formation of Fung-wong, an area of convectional cloudiness persisted on September 19. On September 22, both the JMA and JTWC starts to monitor a tropical disturbance over the Mariana Islands within that area or convection. The JMA had upgraded it to a tropical depression, as it starts to show signs of intensification early on September 23. This continued until on September 24, when the JMA upgraded the storm to Tropical Storm Kammuri, while the JTWC designated the system as 17W.[123] As the low-level circulation improved, Kammuri became more organized. With this, a large eye started to develop.[124] On September 26, the JMA upgraded the system to a severe tropical storm.[125] Later that day, Kammuri reached its peak intensity.[126] On September 27, Kammuri started to interact with the outflow of the extratropical remnants of Fung-wong, as well as vertical windshear, which caused Kammuri to weaken.[127][128] On the next day, the JMA downgraded Kammuri to a tropical storm, as the system continued to weaken.[129] On September 30, Kammuri transitioned into an extratropical cyclone, prompting the JMA to issue its final advisory on the storm.

Typhoon Phanfone (Neneng)[edit]

Typhoon (JMA)
Category 4 typhoon (SSHWS)
Phanfone 2014-10-03 0155Z.jpg Phanfone 2014 track.png
Duration September 27 – October 6
Peak intensity 175 km/h (110 mph) (10-min)  932 hPa (mbar)

On September 26, a large area of convection persisted well west of the International Dateline.[130] In the same time, JTWC had classified it as a tropical disturbance.[131] The JMA classified this to a tropical depression on September 28, while the JTWC designated it as 18W the next day. On September 29, 18W intensified into Tropical Storm Phanfone, due to very favorable conditions and intense thunderstorms rich with convection surrounding the storm's center. Due to these factors, Phanfone continued displaying signs of intensification later that day.[132][133] Phanfone strengthened into a minimal typhoon late on September 30. But due to warm sea-surface temperatures and very favorable environments, Phanfone underwent rapid deepening on October 1.[134] The next day, Phanfone strengthened into a category 4 typhoon. However, the storm then weakened to a category 3. This is due to its eye replacing the old one and undergoing a minor eyewall replacement cycle,[135] although the JTWC upgraded Phanfone to a category 4 again late on October 3. In the same time, Phanfone entered the PAR, with PAGASA assigning the name Neneng,[136] although the storm exited the basin several hours later.[137] On October 4, Phanfone reached its peak intensity, with the JTWC classifying it as a super typhoon.[138] After it affected Japan, the JTWC issued its last advisory on the system, as it tracked noreastward and extremely affected by a strong vertical wind shear.[139]

Typhoon Vongfong (Ompong)[edit]

Typhoon (JMA)
Category 5 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Vongfong Oct 07 2014 0135Z.jpg Vongfong 2014 track.png
Duration October 2 – October 14
Peak intensity 215 km/h (130 mph) (10-min)  898 hPa (mbar)

On September 30, the JTWC had been monitoring a weak tropical disturbance which formed from the Intertropical Convergence Zone. The system steadily intensified as it moved towards favorable environments and warm waters.[140][141] On October 2, the JMA upgraded the system to a tropical depression. Later that day, the JTWC classified it as Tropical Storm 19W. 19W soon intensified into a tropical storm, with the JMA naming it Vongfong upon its intensification into a tropical storm.[142] Due to a strong outflow, Vongfong intensified into a minimal typhoon, even as it affected the Mariana Islands. Warnings were canceled in the area, as Vongfong moved in a westward direction.[143] The next day, Vongfong entered an area of warm waters. This allowed the system to enter a rapid deepening phase, and as a result, it was upgraded to a Category 3 typhoon by the JTWC later that day. Late on October 7, PAGASA declared that Vongfong had entered their area of responsibility, and named it Ompong.[144] Early on October 8, Vongfong intensified from a Category 3 to a Category 5 super typhoon.[145] This also made Vongfong the most powerful tropical cyclone of 2014,[146] and the most intense since Typhoon Haiyan.[147] Although Vongfong maintained its intensity, the typhoon undergo an eyewall replacement cycle and this made Vongfong to weaken late the next day.[148] On October 10, the JTWC downgraded Vongfong to a category 3 typhoon, as its convection started to weakened slightly.[149] This also made the system weakened to a category 2 typhoon early on October 11, and passed by the island of Okinawa.[150] Due to drier inflow, Vongfong weakened to a weak typhoon. Vongfong made landfall over southwestern Japan on October 13, just as both agencies downgraded it to a strong tropical storm.[151][152] Dry air surrounded to southern periphery of Vongfong as the JMA issued its final advisory. The JTWC followed suit as the system became fully extratropical on October 14. The extratropical remnants of Vongfong exited the West Pacific basin three days later.

Typhoon Nuri (Paeng)[edit]

Typhoon (JMA)
Category 5 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Nuri Nov 02 2014 2314Z.png Nuri 2014 track.png
Duration October 30 – November 7
Peak intensity 185 km/h (115 mph) (10-min)  923 hPa (mbar)

Late on October 28, the JTWC spotted a weak tropical disturbance east of Guam.[153][154] The next day, it had consolidated over favorable environments,[155] whereas the JMA classified the disturbance as a tropical depression on October 30.[156] On the following day, the JTWC issued warnings on the tropical depression, which was designated as 20W.[157] Later that day, the JMA upgraded 20W to Tropical Storm Nuri, as the JTWC had later followed suit.[158] Early on November 1, Nuri gradually intensified as it entered the PAR, with PAGASA naming it Paeng.[159][160] Later that day, the JMA upgraded the storm to a severe tropical storm.[161][162] Due to an increase of convective activity, Nuri had intensified into a typhoon.[163] On November 2, Nuri had undergone a phase of rapid deepening and dropped 55 millibars in one day.[164][165] This also made the JTWC upgrade Nuri to a Category 4 typhoon. On November 3, Nuri continued to intensify and reached Category 5 strength, as it started to move in a northward direction.[165] Later that day, Nuri reached its peak intensity, with maximum sustained winds of 285km/h (180 mph) and tied with Vongfong.[165] Some shear and cool sea-surface temperatures caused Nuri to weaken early on November 3.[166] The next day, both the JMA and the JTWC downgraded Nuri to a category 3 typhoon.[167][168] Around that time, the storm underwent an eyewall replacement cycle.[169]

Severe Tropical Storm Sinlaku (Queenie)[edit]

Severe tropical storm (JMA)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Sinlaku 2014-11-29 0330Z.jpg Sinlaku 2014 track.png
Duration November 25 – December 1
Peak intensity 100 km/h (65 mph) (10-min)  987 hPa (mbar)

On November 23, a cluster of thunderstorms was located near the equator. Late on November 24, a broad area of low-pressure develops well east of Mindanao, Philippines. On November 26, the area gradually developed convection near its center and PAGASA had upgraded it to Tropical Depression Queenie.[170] Later the same day, both the JMA and the JTWC classified Queenie as a tropical depression, with the JTWC also designating it as 21W.[171][172] On November 28, the JMA upgraded the system to a tropical storm, assigning the name Sinlaku,[173] while the JTWC followed suit. Due to low vertical windshear, Sinlaku gathered strength while it was on the South China Sea. The next day, convective activity increased near the storm's center. In the same time, the JMA upgraded Sinlaku to a severe tropical storm. Later that day, Sinlaku made landfall over Vietnam as it started to weaken. Both agencies downgraded the system to a tropical depression early on November 30. The JTWC and the JMA both made their final advisory on Sinlaku later the same day until it dissipated few hours before December 1.

Typhoon Hagupit (Ruby)[edit]

Typhoon (JMA)
Category 5 super typhoon (SSHWS)
Hagupit 2014-12-04 0438Z.jpg Hagupit 2014 track.png
Duration December 1 – December 12
Peak intensity 220 km/h (140 mph) (10-min)  900 hPa (mbar)

Late on November 29, a tropical disturbance was located just north of the equator near Chuuk.[174] The next day, the system entered an area of favorable environment and it had rapidly developed even further. With this, the JTWC issued a Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert on the disturbance.[175] On December 1, both the JMA and the JTWC upgraded it to a tropical depression and was given the designation 22W by the JTWC.[176][177] It was later upgraded into a tropical storm by the JTWC, and was later named Hagupit by the JMA as they followed suit.[178][179] During the same time, Hagupit rapidly deepened by 50 mbars, from a minimal typhoon to a Category 5 super typhoon early on December 4 as a clear and well-defined eye developed.[180][181] Later the same day, Hagupit entered the PAR, with PAGASA giving the name Ruby. Very early on December 6, Hagupit reached its maximum intensity with a pressure down to 905 millibars and 1-min sustained winds of 285 km/h (180 mph), which was the same as Vongfong's intensity.[182] Later that day, Hagupit encountered moderate vertical windshear from the east and started an eyewall replacement cycle as it weakened to a Category 4 super typhoon intensity.[183][184] The JTWC downgraded Hagupit to a Category 3 typhoon just before December 7.[185][186] Moreover, a slight break in the steering and the zonal flow along the southern periphery of the mid-latitude trough lacked the dynamics to influence Hagupit, making the typhoon move in a slow westward direction.[187] Nearly the same time, Hagupit made landfall over Eastern Samar and encountered land reaction, as it further weakened to a Category 2 typhoon.[188][189] Hours later, the system moved in a northwestward direction and made its second landfall over Masbate.[190] The next day, both agencies downgraded Hagupit to a strong tropical storm, due to its continued slow movement and land reaction.[191][192] During the same time it weakened to a tropical storm, Hagupit made its third landfall over the island of Marinduque.[193] During its fourth landfall over Batangas, the JMA downgraded it to a tropical storm.[194][195]

On December 9, Hagupit entered the South China Sea, retaining its tropical storm intensity.[196] Although due to an increase of deep convection near the center,[197] the JMA upgraded Hagupit again to a severe tropical storm early on December 10.[198][199] Later that day, the JMA downgraded it again to a minimal tropical storm.[200] The next day, both agencies downgraded the storm to a tropical depression, as it started to do a southwestward direction towards Vietnam. On December 12, the JTWC issued its final warning on Hagupit.[201] The JMA tracked it until it dissipated just southeast of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam later the same day.[202][203]

Tropical Storm Jangmi (Seniang)[edit]

Tropical storm (JMA)
Tropical storm (SSHWS)
Jangmi 2014-12-29 0505Z.jpg Jangmi 2014 track.png
Duration December 26, 2014 – January 2, 2015
Peak intensity 75 km/h (45 mph) (10-min)  993 hPa (mbar)

Names[edit]

International names[edit]

Tropical cyclones are named from a set of five naming lists set by the JMA's Regional Specialized Meteorological Centre in Tokyo, Japan, once they reach tropical storm strength.[204] Names are contributed by members of the ESCAP/WMO Typhoon Committee. Each of the 14 nations and territories submitted ten names, which are used in alphabetical order, by the official English name of the country.[205] The next 25 names on the naming list are listed here along with their international numeric designation, if they are used.

  • Lingling (1401)
  • Kajiki (1402)
  • Faxai (1403)
  • Peipah (1404)
  • Tapah (1405)
  • Mitag (1406)
  • Hagibis (1407)
  • Neoguri (1408)
  • Rammasun (1409)
  • Matmo (1410)
  • Halong (1411)
  • Nakri (1412)
  • Genevieve (1413)
  • Fensghen (1414)
  • Kalmaegi (1415)
  • Fung-wong (1416)
  • Kammuri (1417)
  • Phanfone (1418)
  • Vongfong (1419)
  • Nuri (1420)
  • Sinlaku (1421)
  • Hagupit (1422)
  • Jangmi (1423)

Philippines[edit]

The PAGASA uses its own naming scheme for tropical cyclones in their area of responsibility. PAGASA assigns names to tropical depressions that form within their area of responsibility and any tropical cyclone that might move into their area of responsibility. Should the list of names for a given year be exhausted, names will be taken from an auxiliary list, the first ten of which are published each year before the season starts. Names not retired from this list will be used again in the 2018 season. This is the same list used in the 2010 season, with the exception of Jose which replaced Juan respectively. Names that were not assigned/going to use are marked in gray.[206]

  • Agaton (1401)
  • Basyang (1402)
  • Caloy
  • Domeng (1404)
  • Ester (1406)
  • Florita (1408)
  • Glenda (1409)
  • Henry (1410)
  • Inday (1412)
  • Jose (1411)
  • Karding
  • Luis (1415)
  • Mario (1416)
  • Neneng (1418)
  • Ompong (1419)
  • Paeng (1420)
  • Queenie (1421)
  • Ruby (1422)
  • Seniang (1423)
  • Tomas (unused)
  • Usman (unused)
  • Venus (unused)
  • Waldo (unused)
  • Yayang (unused)
  • Zeny (unused)

Auxiliary list

  • Agila (unused)
  • Bagwis (unused)
  • Chito (unused)
  • Diego (unused)
  • Elena (unused)
  • Felino (unused)
  • Gunding (unused)
  • Harriet (unused)
  • Indang (unused)
  • Jessa (unused)

Season effects[edit]

This table will list all the storms that developed in the northwestern Pacific Ocean west of the International Date Line and north of the equator during 2014. It will include their intensity, duration, name, areas affected, deaths, and damage totals. Classification and intensity values will be based on estimations conducted by the JMA. All damage figures will be in 2014 USD. Damages and deaths from a storm will include when the storm was a precursor wave or an extratropical low.


Name Dates active Peak classification Sustained
wind speeds
Pressure Areas affected Damage
(USD)
Deaths Refs
Lingling (Agaton) January 10 – January 19 Tropical storm 65 km/h (40 mph) 1002 hPa (29.59 inHg) Palau, Philippines $7.29 million 42 [13]
Season aggregates
1 system January 10 – Currently active 65 km/h (40 mph) 1002 hPa (29.59 inHg) $7.29 million 42


See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

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