User talk:Anticla rutila

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Anticla rutila, you are invited to the Teahouse![edit]

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History of the United States
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References[edit]

Remember that when adding content about health, please only use high-quality reliable sources as references. We typically use review articles, major textbooks and position statements of national or international organizations. WP:MEDHOW walks you through editing step by step. A list of resources to help edit health content can be found here. The edit box has a build in citation tool to easily format references based on the PMID or ISBN. We also provide style advice about the structure and content of medicine-related encyclopedia articles. The welcome page is another good place to learn about editing the encyclopedia. If you have any questions, please feel free to drop me a note. Doc James (talk · contribs · email) 10:49, 28 March 2016 (UTC)

As this is based on mostly primary sources have moved here. Also anorexia and bulimia do not need capitals. Doc James (talk · contribs · email) 10:49, 28 March 2016 (UTC)
Extended content

Stiff and rigid personalities have been consistently linked with eating disorders, especially with Anorexia Nervosa.[1][2] Divergences between different studies as to the incidence of Obsessive–compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) among anorexics and bulimics has been found, which may in part reflect differences in the methodology chosen in different studies, as well as the difficulties of diagnosing personality disorders.[2] In the table below, results are shown for the frequency of OCPD among anorexics (non-specified subtype, AN), restricting anorexics (RAN), binge/purge anorexics as well as anorexics with a history of Bulimia Nervosa (BPAN), and normal-weight bulimics (BN).

Study AN RAN BPAN BN
Arderluh et al. (2009)[3] 71.4% 46.7%—64% 40%
Halmi et al. (2005a)[4] 31% 32% 24%
Halmi et al. (2005b)[2] 6% 11-13% 0%
Anderluh et al. (2003)[3] 61% 46%
Matsunaga et al. (1999)[5] 43.8% 25% 25%

OCPD predicts including more severe anorexic symptoms,[6] worse remission rates,[6] and the presence of aggravating behaviors such as compulsive exercising.[7] Compulsive exercising in eating disordered samples, along with smaller lifetime BMI and illness duration among anorexics,[8] also correlates positively and significantly with an important OCPD trait, perfectionism.[9]

Perfectionism has been linked with Anorexia Nervosa in research for decades. Researchers in 1949 described the behavior of the average anorexic girl as being "rigid" and "hyperconscious", observing also a tendency to "[n]eatness, meticulosity, and a mulish stubbornness not amenable to reason [which] make her a rank perfectionist".[1] Perfectionism is a life enduring trait in the biographies of anorexics. It is felt before the onset of the eating disorder, generally in childhood,[3] during the illness, and also, after remission.[10] The incessant striving for thinness among anorexic women is itself a manifestation of this trait, of an insistence upon meeting unattainably high standards of performance.[11] Because of its chronicity, those with eating disorders also display perfectionistic tendencies in other domains of life than dieting and weight control. Over-achievement at school, for example, has been observed among anorexics,[11][12][13] as a result of their over-industrious behavior.[11][14][15]

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Animal welfare and rights in China
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April 2016[edit]

Please stop continuing to remove maintenance templates from pages on Wikipedia, as you did to Animal welfare in the United Kingdom, without resolving the problem that the template refers to. This may be considered disruptive editing. Further edits of this type may result in your account being blocked from editing. The paragraph I removed gave undue weight to the proposals made by a single party, using a party newsletter as a source. Writing "Repairs" in the edit summary while removing tags is highly inappropriate. Laber□T 14:27, 16 April 2016 (UTC)

Hello[edit]

Hi there, it looks like you've done a lot of work on animal welfare-related pages. If you are interested in talking more with someone who's also interested in animal welfare/rights, email me at jclifton333@gmail.com! (Sorry if this is not the appropriate way to get in touch, I'm a scrub =P) — Preceding unsigned comment added by JesseClifton (talkcontribs) 22:14, 9 May 2016 (UTC)

Thanks for that Jesse. Code: 321 Anticla rutila (talk) 12:37, 11 May 2016 (UTC)

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ArbCom Elections 2016: Voting now open![edit]

Scale of justice 2.svgHello, Anticla rutila. Voting in the 2016 Arbitration Committee elections is open from Monday, 00:00, 21 November through Sunday, 23:59, 4 December to all unblocked users who have registered an account before Wednesday, 00:00, 28 October 2016 and have made at least 150 mainspace edits before Sunday, 00:00, 1 November 2016.

The Arbitration Committee is the panel of editors responsible for conducting the Wikipedia arbitration process. It has the authority to impose binding solutions to disputes between editors, primarily for serious conduct disputes the community has been unable to resolve. This includes the authority to impose site bans, topic bans, editing restrictions, and other measures needed to maintain our editing environment. The arbitration policy describes the Committee's roles and responsibilities in greater detail.

If you wish to participate in the 2016 election, please review the candidates' statements and submit your choices on the voting page. MediaWiki message delivery (talk) 22:08, 21 November 2016 (UTC)

  1. ^ a b DuBois, F.S. (1949). "Compulsion neurosis with cachexia (Anorexia Nervosa)". American Journal of Psychiatry. 106: 107–115. doi:10.1176/ajp.106.2.107.
  2. ^ a b c Halmi, Katherin A (2005). "Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder and Eating Disorders" (PDF). Eating Disorders. 13 (1): 85–92. doi:10.1080/10640260590893683. PMID 16864333.
  3. ^ a b c Anderluh, Marija Brecelj (2009). "Lifetime course of eating disorders: design and validity testing of a new strategy to define the eating disorders phenotype" (PDF). Psychological Medicine. 39: 105–114. doi:10.1017/S0033291708003292. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "Anderluh" defined multiple times with different content (see the help page).
  4. ^ Halmi, Katherin A (2005). "The Relation among Perfectionism, Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder in Individuals with Eating Disorders". Int J Eat Disord. 38 (4): 371–374. doi:10.1002/eat.20190. PMID 16231356.
  5. ^ Hisato Matsunaga; et al. (1999). "A Comparison of Clinical Features Among Japanese Eating-Disordered Women With Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder". Comprehensive Psychiatry. 40 (5): 337–342. doi:10.1016/s0010-440x(99)90137-2.
  6. ^ a b Crane, Anna (2007). "Are Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Traits Associated with a Poor Outcome in Anorexia Nervosa? A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials and Naturalistic Outcome Studies". International Journal of Eating Disorders. 40: 581–8. doi:10.1002/eat.20419. PMID 17607713.
  7. ^ Davis, Caroline (1998). "Obsessionality in Anorexia Nervosa: The Moderating Influence of Exercise". Psychosomatic Medicine. 60 (2): 192–7. doi:10.1097/00006842-199803000-00015. PMID 9560869.
  8. ^ Halmi, Katherine A. (2000). "Perfectionism in Anorexia Nervosa: Variation by Clinical Subtype, Obsessionality, and Pathological Eating Behavior". Am J Psychiatry. 157: 1799–1805. doi:10.1176/appi.ajp.157.11.1799.
  9. ^ Shroff, Hemal (2006). "Features Associated With Excessive Exercise in Women with Eating Disorders" (PDF). International Journal of Eating Disorders. 39 (6): 454–461. doi:10.1002/eat.20247.
  10. ^ Srinivasagam (1995). "Persistent perfectionism, symmetry, and exactness after long-term recovery from anorexia nervosa". Am J Psychiatry. 152 (11): 1630–4. doi:10.1176/ajp.152.11.1630. PMID 7485626.
  11. ^ a b c JR Dura; et al. (1989). "Differences between IQ and school achievement in anorexia nervosa". Journal of Clinical Psychology. 45 (3): 433–5. doi:10.1002/1097-4679(198905)45:3<433::aid-jclp2270450313>3.0.co;2-x. PMID 2745732.
  12. ^ Michael Strober (1981). "The Significance of Bulimia in Juvenile Anorexia Nervosa: An Exploration of Possible Etiologic Factors". International Journal of Eating Disorders. 1 (1): 28–43. doi:10.1002/1098-108X(198123).
  13. ^ D. L. NORRIS (1979). "Clinical Diagnostic Criteria for Primary Anorexia Nervosa". South African Medical Journal: 987–93.
  14. ^ Hilde Bruch (2001). The Golden Cage: The Enigma of Anorexia Nervosa. First Harvard University Press. p. 46.
  15. ^ Bernard Viallettes (2001). L'anorexie mentale, une déraison philosophique. L'Harmattan. p. 89. ISBN 2-7475-0876-5. ...even in the category of young women with low IQs, some had brilliant school records. This probably is the result of the persistence in work that characterizes anorexic patients.