User talk:Brianann MacAmhlaidh/Archive 1

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Welcome!

Hello, Brianann MacAmhlaidh, and welcome to Wikipedia! Thank you for your contributions, especially what you did for Staffordshire hoard. I hope you like the place and decide to stay. Here are some pages that you might find helpful:

I hope you enjoy editing here and being a Wikipedian! Please sign your messages on discussion pages using four tildes (~~~~); this will automatically insert your username and the date. If you need help, check out Wikipedia:Questions, ask me on my talk page, or ask your question on this page and then place {{helpme}} before the question. Again, welcome! Nick Ottery (talk) 07:51, 25 September 2009 (UTC)


Thanks for cleaning up Hammer of Thor (monument) and adding the image. Excellent work.--Auric (talk) 20:22, 26 September 2009 (UTC)

Thanks. I noticed a photo and a blurb about it in a book; when i googled for it, i came across the article you created. It got me interested in Mowat's stuff. I started one on the Beardmore Relics. Maybe you've got a book or something that mentions this find?--Breandán MacAmhlaidh (talk) 06:44, 27 September 2009 (UTC)

DYK for Beardmore Relics

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Gatoclass 20:43, 28 September 2009 (UTC)

High Crosses template

I like this, but I wonder if it would be better to divide them by cultural group: Anglo-Saxon, Irish, Pictish. Ruthwell Cross is obviously Anglo-Saxon & Northumbrian, but Ruthwell has been in Scotland for the last 1,000 years or so. The Kildalton Cross, like the Iona ones, are really Irish; Ireland was just an hour or two away by boat, most of the Scottish mainland much less accessible. I hope the template will encourage more articles on the Irish crosses, which should by rights be the most numerous. Johnbod (talk) 12:48, 30 September 2009 (UTC)

OK, no problems. I don't have any reference that really distinguishes British/Irish crosses, so i think you ought to re-organise it. Now i just noticed i had the Ruthwell one listed in England! I was also thinking that maybe the link to 'celtic cross' could be taken off the title as well.--Breandán MacAmhlaidh (talk) 05:20, 1 October 2009 (UTC)
Done - the division, at least of those we have so far, is uncontroversial I think. I realized we needed a Cornish category too - I don't think there are many left in Wales since the reformation. Johnbod (talk) 12:54, 1 October 2009 (UTC)


File copyright problem with File:High Crosses of Ireland (map).png

File Copyright problem

Thank you for uploading File:High Crosses of Ireland (map).png. However, it currently is missing information on its copyright status. Wikipedia takes copyright very seriously. It may be deleted soon, unless we can determine the license and the source of the file. If you know this information, then you can add a copyright tag to the image description page.

If you have uploaded other files, consider checking that you have specified their license and tagged them, too. You can find a list of files you have uploaded by following this link.

If you have any questions, please feel free to ask them at the media copyright questions page. Thanks again for your cooperation. ww2censor (talk) 17:03, 1 October 2009 (UTC)

DYK nomination of Muiredach's High Cross

Symbol question.svg Hello! Your submission of Muiredach's High Cross at the Did You Know nominations page has been reviewed, and there still are some issues that may need to be clarified. Please review the comment(s) underneath your nomination's entry and respond there as soon as possible. Thank you for contributing to Did You Know! Nick Ottery (talk) 08:01, 2 October 2009 (UTC)

DYK for Muiredach's High Cross

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Mifter (talk) 00:28, 8 October 2009 (UTC)

WP:SPLIT

Hello. When you split part of an article off to create a new article, as you did with Maxwell (surname), the GFDL attribution requirements make it necessary to specify where the original text came from. I've done that for you already on this one. Happy editing! 152.16.16.75 (talk) 10:50, 25 October 2009 (UTC)

Ok, thanks. I had no idea. So every time i move something over, i have to make a mention of it in the edit summary. Got it.--Breandán MacAmhlaidh (talk) 10:58, 25 October 2009 (UTC)

Deletions

Thanks for your good faith improvements to the project. When deleting material, like here,[1] it's especially important to give an explanation in the edit summary. Otherwise we have to figure out what you're up to (good works, as now I see). Carry on, but please leave explanatory notes for other editors.   Will Beback  talk  11:13, 25 October 2009 (UTC)

OK, got it. I'll use summaries for every edit.--Breandán MacAmhlaidh (talk) 03:52, 28 October 2009 (UTC)

Name change request

There is no SUL user with the target name you requested. Do you just want a standard name change? -- Avi (talk) 05:58, 29 October 2009 (UTC)

October 2009

Information.png Welcome to Wikipedia. The recent edit you made to the page O'Neill has been reverted, as it appears to be unconstructive. Use the sandbox for testing; if you believe the edit was constructive, please ensure that you provide an informative edit summary. You may also wish to read the introduction to editing. Thank you. Shadowjams (talk) 06:38, 30 October 2009 (UTC)

Replaceing Kennedy Image

You replaced an image of the Kennedy arms with an image created by Joseph McMillan, however the person that uploaded it is not Mr. McMillin and therefore has no right to release it to the public domain. The details in the image contradict themselves, claiming the uploaded made it, but at the same time it was authored by Mr. McMillan. That image would also need to be deleted and a free one found. XANDERLIPTAK 09:43, 31 October 2009 (UTC)

I tried to talk to Mr. McMillan about releasing his images a couple months ago, but he never responded to my request. He was more interested in linking back to his articles on the AHS. That was why I made the ones I did, I figured them better then nothing for the moment. I am not familiar with marking images for any violations, so if you could do such, I would appreciate the effort. XANDERLIPTAK 09:51, 31 October 2009 (UTC)

I have talked with Mr. McMillan in heraldry forums some, and nothing on that users page matches up with that of Mr. McMillan's-from the age, to the coat of arms. I am confident that the user is not Mr. McMillan. XANDERLIPTAK 09:56, 31 October 2009 (UTC)

I have made simpler designs and released them fully 20px, but I do not like clip art to make coat of arms, it takes away from teh style and thus appeal of it all. Heraldry is an art, and I thought if I had a couple nice examples, then let those be used, even if in limited fashion. I know Wikipedia likes totally free content, and I understand the purpose and reasoning, but then there are those that could take advantage of another's work for gain, which I wished to avoid that possibility on the more time consuming efforts. I will avoid this conflict int he future and simply make the less time consuming versions for the public domain. XANDERLIPTAK 10:49, 31 October 2009 (UTC)

Hi, you have been helpful to me, so I was wondering if I could ask a couple of questions. First, if I come across an image that may have copyright issues, how do I mark that? And second, how do I mark an entry to suggest it be merged with another article? XANDERLIPTAK 00:47, 2 November 2009 (UTC)

Thank you for helping and pointing me to the right pages. I appreciate your time and efforts. [tk] XANDERLIPTAK 17:13, 2 November 2009 (UTC)

Your undoing of someone's changes in Aidan

I noticed that you undid someone's set of six inappropriate changes to Aidan by making six "undos" in a row yourself. To make things easier for yourself in the future, in an article's history you can use the radio buttons on the left side of the page to select the final state of the article and the state to which you wish to restore it, use the "Compare selected revisions" button to show a side-by-side comparison of the two, and then use the link reading "restore this version" over the earlier, good version on the left to restore the article to the pre-vandalism state. —Largo Plazo (talk) 13:27, 15 November 2009 (UTC)

DYK for Dùn an Achaidh

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Materialscientist (talk) 13:42, 25 November 2009 (UTC)

DYK nomination of McQueen (surname)

Symbol question.svg Hello! Your submission of McQueen (surname) at the Did You Know nominations page has been reviewed, and there still are some issues that may need to be clarified. Please review the comment(s) underneath your nomination's entry and respond there as soon as possible. Thank you for contributing to Did You Know! Calmer Waters 05:00, 4 December 2009 (UTC)

DYK nomination of Dunan Aula

Symbol question.svg Hello! Your submission of Dunan Aula at the Did You Know nominations page has been reviewed, and there still are some issues that may need to be clarified. Please review the comment(s) underneath your nomination's entry and respond there as soon as possible. Thank you for contributing to Did You Know! Materialscientist (talk) 11:10, 4 December 2009 (UTC)

DYK for Dùn Dubh

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Jake Wartenberg 16:07, 4 December 2009 (UTC)

DYK for Dùn Morbhaidh

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Jake Wartenberg 16:07, 4 December 2009 (UTC)

DYK for Gilli (jarl)

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Materialscientist (talk) 18:00, 6 December 2009 (UTC)

DYK for Dunan Aula

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Materialscientist (talk) 18:07, 7 December 2009 (UTC)

Coll and all

Just dropped by to say I've been admiring your efforts on Coll and environs. Congratulations on some fine work. Ben MacDui 20:35, 9 December 2009 (UTC)

Thanks for that. :) I guess the island and its history has captured my imagination.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 08:44, 11 December 2009 (UTC)

DYK for Breachacha crannog

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Materialscientist (talk) 11:42, 17 December 2009 (UTC)

DYK for Dùn Beic

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Materialscientist (talk) 11:42, 18 December 2009 (UTC)

DYK nomination of Dùn Foulag

Symbol question.svg Hello! Your submission of Dùn Foulag at the Did You Know nominations page has been reviewed, and there still are some issues that may need to be clarified. Please review the comment(s) underneath your nomination's entry and respond there as soon as possible. Thank you for contributing to Did You Know! Materialscientist (talk) 00:28, 20 December 2009 (UTC)

DYK for An Caisteall (Coll)

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Materialscientist (talk) 19:42, 21 December 2009 (UTC)

Re:Request

Would you happen to know if the crest for the older arms is the same for the crest of the newer arms? I am sure I could find it somewhere if you are uncertain, though. But thought I shoudl ask if you knew offhand. [tk] XANDERLIPTAK 08:58, 23 December 2009 (UTC)

Let me know if you find these acceptable. 65px 35px 35px [tk] XANDERLIPTAK 16:27, 23 December 2009 (UTC)
It was no problem, and thank you for the compliments. You have a good Christmas and enjoy your New Years. :-) [tk] XANDERLIPTAK 15:44, 25 December 2009 (UTC)
I wanted to take some of the pixelation off the image, the castle looked a bit ragged I thought. But, yes, I agree, they did not turn out any better. I will be reverting them later. [tk] XANDERLIPTAK 01:48, 27 December 2009 (UTC)

Talkback

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SchuminWeb (Talk) 01:43, 27 December 2009 (UTC)

House of Burke

Hi, my name is Cam, just wondering as you seem to know what you are talking about and have had dealings with the O'Neill dynasty, whether the House of Burke page should be renamed to either Burke dynasty or de Burgh dynasty? Any comments? Regards Newm30 (talk) 05:11, 27 December 2009 (UTC)

Talkback

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SchuminWeb (Talk) 15:07, 27 December 2009 (UTC)

Re:Deleted images

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-FASTILY (TALK) 21:14, 28 December 2009 (UTC)

Clan Makgill Revisited

This page has been merged into the Clan Makgill page. Thanks for the suggestion. Please delete Clan Makgill Revisited.

Ted McGill 13:34, 2 January 2010 (UTC) Ted McGill

No need to delete, i just redirected it there [2].--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 05:24, 3 January 2010 (UTC)

DYK for Leod

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Materialscientist (talk) 18:00, 2 January 2010 (UTC)

Great stuff

Original Barnstar.png The Original Barnstar
Your contributions such as Páll, son of Bálki are much appreciated, and non modo sed etiam this article "discovered" not one but two islands hitherto unknown to WikiProject Scottish Islands! Ben MacDui 12:15, 3 January 2010 (UTC)
Haha thanks very much MacDui. I'm happy to help.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 12:34, 3 January 2010 (UTC)

The Wikipedia Signpost: 11 January 2010

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DYK for Páll, son of Bálki

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Materialscientist (talk) 00:00, 13 January 2010 (UTC)

Clan MacEacharn

Thank you for your help in editing Clan MacEacharn wiki. In Gamor could quite easily mean In Garmorwarne. It seems quite obvious. Garmorwane is Morvern Amceache (talk) 11:29, 17 January 2010 (UTC)

DYK submission of Iain_Borb_MacLeod

Hello Brianann, I left a question regarding your recent DYK nomination. Just inquiring about the wording of the hook. Thanks in advance. Kindly Calmer Waters 02:35, 18 January 2010 (UTC)

DYK for Onlafbald and Scula

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Materialscientist {{toolbar|separator=dot|talk | contribs 18:00, 18 January 2010 (UTC)

DYK for Tormod, son of Leod

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Materialscientist (talk) 06:00, 19 January 2010 (UTC)

DYK for Torquil, son of Murdoch

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Materialscientist (talk) 06:00, 19 January 2010 (UTC)

The Wikipedia Signpost: 18 January 2010

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DYK nomination of Ljótólfr

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DYK for Ljótólfr

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Materialscientist (talk) 06:00, 23 January 2010 (UTC)

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Battle of Glendale (Skye)

I like your article on the Battle of Glendale (Skye). Keep up the good work. QuintusPetillius (talk) 17:37, 26 January 2010 (UTC)

Thanks Quintus.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 06:52, 27 January 2010 (UTC)

DYK for Iain Borb MacLeod

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Materialscientist (talk) 00:00, 27 January 2010 (UTC)

DYK for Iain Ciar MacLeod

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The DYK project 12:00, 27 January 2010 (UTC)

just wanted to say this was a fascinating article, well done, Ottawa4ever (talk) 12:20, 27 January 2010 (UTC)
Thanks very much. It was fun working on it.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 08:12, 28 January 2010 (UTC)

DYK for Malcolm MacLeod (clan chief)

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Materialscientist (talk) 18:00, 31 January 2010 (UTC)

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DYK for William Dubh MacLeod

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Materialscientist (talk) 12:00, 3 February 2010 (UTC)

DYK nomination of Battle of Glendale (Skye)

Symbol question.svg Hello! Your submission of Battle of Glendale (Skye) at the Did You Know nominations page has been reviewed, and there still are some issues that may need to be clarified. Please review the comment(s) underneath your nomination's entry and respond there as soon as possible. Thank you for contributing to Did You Know! otherlleft 15:16, 6 February 2010 (UTC)

DYK for Battle of Glendale (Skye)

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The DYK project (nominate) 12:00, 8 February 2010 (UTC)

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DYK for Alasdair Crotach MacLeod

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The DYK project (nominate) 06:00, 10 February 2010 (UTC)

Template:Smith-surname

Thx for contrib and appreciation. Are there any Gaelic cooks for Template:Cook-surname on your mind? - Altenmann >t 08:05, 13 February 2010 (UTC)

DYK for Ingemund

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Materialscientist (talk) 00:01, 14 February 2010 (UTC)

Page edits

Hi Brianann

Please can you explain why you have removed parts of the information on the Surname page, I agree with some of the edits like the spaces and the categories, however do not agree on the other parts removed, it would have been nice to be consulted before hand and had discussions on why they should have been removed. I am not trying to promote any one or anything, just trying to give any one with the surname variations more information on there origins. —Preceding unsigned comment added by DjMcGeachie (talkcontribs) 15:25, 14 February 2010 (UTC)

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DYK for MS 1467

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Materialscientist (talk) 06:05, 17 February 2010 (UTC)

Romanian surnames

I noticed you removed the Romanian surnames from this article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_most_common_surnames. May I ask why and what I should do to bring them back? Thanks Calusarul (talk) 23:26, 17 February 2010 (UTC)

Leod

This article is good, and will pass GA, but you should amend the footnotes in cases where the Mcleod genealogy website is reprinting an article originally published elsewhere. It should appear as "cited in" or similar, and the original source be named. (But don't imply that you sighted the original source, assuming you did not). Cheers, hamiltonstone (talk) 01:54, 18 February 2010 (UTC)

DYK for Thomas Bassett Macaulay

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Materialscientist (talk) 12:10, 22 February 2010 (UTC)

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DYK for Peter Love

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Congrats! Ruhrfisch ><>°° 18:12, 26 February 2010 (UTC)

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Munro chiefs

Hi Brianann, I'm glad you like the article Chiefs of Clan Munro. There was a few things which needed to be said about the chiefs and the Clan Munro article had got far to big. So as the chiefs of Clan Fraser had their own article I thought I would do the same for the Munros. I might move the Mackenzie information myself at some point. Whoever wrote all the info about the Mackenzie chiefs must feel strongly about it. And it seems these days that there are always disputes as to who the rightful chief really is. All the best. QuintusPetillius (talk) 17:17, 5 March 2010 (UTC)

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de Clare

Thank you for your offer of a source on the de clare site. I have enabled my e-mail for that purpose. Incidentally, I have glanced a some of the articles you have created. Most impressive. Mugginsx (talk) 16:07, 10 March 2010 (UTC)

Have received the information. It is very interesting. Once again, thank you! Mugginsx (talk) 10:20, 11 March 2010 (UTC)

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Hi Brianann MacAmhlaidh, just wanted to let you know that I have added the autoreviewer right to your account, as you have created numerous, valid articles. This feature should have little to no effect on your editing, and is simply intended to reduce the workload on new page patrollers. For more information on the autoreviewer right, see Wikipedia:Autoreviewer. Feel free to leave me a message if you have any questions. Happy editing! Arbitrarily0 (talk) 12:19, 15 March 2010 (UTC)

Orr surname

Hi. What exactly is it that you find confusing about the information in this article? Cheers. --94.6.155.205 (talk) 16:39, 15 March 2010 (UTC)

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Your GA nomination of Fairy Flag

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Ireland 800–1169

Hi, I just noticed you made a few edits to this article today - I'm glad to see that someone is watching that page and any help is much appreciated. Even looking at the diff I wasn't able to spot exactly what your edit was however, if it's a format fix like the one you did here it would be good to know so that I could avoid doing similar mistakes in the future.

Also, since you've seem to have seen my progress so far in expanding that article, any feedback on would be much appreciated. Best regards, Finn Rindahl (talk) 12:56, 23 March 2010 (UTC)

Errr, never mind the first part, spotted it: ref-tags after the punctuation mark for refs concerning the whole sentence and not just the last word... Thanks. The second part about feedback still stands though :) Finn Rindahl (talk) 13:03, 23 March 2010 (UTC)
Nothing you need to say "sorry" for, marking such minor edits as "m" should be good enough - the only problem was me squinting at not-so-good-monitor. Best regards, Finn Rindahl (talk) 12:41, 25 March 2010 (UTC)

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Rollback

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Fairy Flag

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Amhlaeibh Mac Innaighneorach

Though Amhalgaidh and Amlaíb are different names, they seem to have been interchangeable, or at least they were to the scribes. So its hard to say which was Amhlaeibh's original form.

I don't think it would be fair to say that Muireadhach Albanach wrote the name this way. I wonder what proportion of poets back then could actually write?

Remind me what MS 1467 is. If of Hebridean origin, I'd guess good money that your name is of Norse background rather than purely Gaelic, but Gaeidhl-Gall and all that.

What of Innaighneorach? Is that a name, or a position? It is a name, and most likely a surname rather than just a patronymic. But I have no idea what the anglicised form of Mac Innaighneorach might be today. A good clue would be knowing where in Ireland he came from. Have to look up MacLysaght's invaluable The Surnames of Ireland for help. Fergananim (talk) 11:38, 27 March 2010 (UTC)

Bards and harpers

Thought you might like a look at this Maol Ruanaidh Cam Ó Cearbhaill, which I just wrote, Mac Innaighneorach been too elusive, I hope this one will give you some flavour of the times.

I love your line I think that the different possibilities and mystery make history interesting. Too right! Fergananim (talk) 13:58, 28 March 2010 (UTC)

Actually, from all the evidence I have seen they lived their lives exactly like The Dubliners and Thin Lizzy did generations later. Meek my arse! Read O Sullivan's book on Carolan; it gives you a pretty vivid idea of the type of life he, McCabe, O'Neill and all the others lived.
Cam I have always understood in the sence of crooked or twisted Witness placenames such as Cemais (Dyfed cantref) and Camus, County Galway use the same root word to describe the region. Also, to me it meant the same as gammy (bent, wrong, bad) in Shelta; I have always used it in this sence. Like John Clyn said, he had defective sight in one eye, but was not blind. If so, he would have been called dall.
You might be onto something with the genetic angle, as I seem to recall a later chief of the name been called Tadgh Caoch Ó Cearbhaill. There was a branch of the O Mael Sechlainn chiefs nicknamed the Gotts after one of their ancestors, who had a gott, a stammer. Also, there were several men of the O Domnhall known was Niall Garbh (garbh=rough) after an ancestor who had that nickname. In this case, it appears to have been traditional that any Niall O Domhnall would be called Garbh, wheather he was or not. Fergananim (talk) 09:31, 29 March 2010 (UTC)
Intruding into this discussion with a minor comment, if you should reach a different conclusion than 'crooked' for Cam, then that probably would be worth mentioning for instance here: Amlaíb_Cuarán#From_Dublin_to_Iona. Regards, Finn Rindahl (talk) 10:25, 29 March 2010 (UTC)
Oh cool. It almost looks like another link between cam and some sort of condition with the eyes. Sitriuc Cam is the same as Sihtric Cáech. His article says cáech means "squinty"; cáech doesn't show up here; [3], but caoch does with one meaning "blind", and another "daze". Downham mentions Sihtric had another nickname Gále. What does that mean (foreigner)?
Here's a bit of a curve, look at this 19th century book, concerning Sihtric it gives caech as "blind", and gale as "the hero". And search for caoch on the dictionary again: although the first two meanings deal with sight, the next two meanings are "(victory, defeat) overwhelming", and "(victory) resounding"! Unfortunately the English translation of the Annals of the Four Masters doesn't actually translate Gale M917.7 Anyway, one of Downham's sources is: BREEZE, Andrew, ‘The Irish Nickname of Sitric Caoch (d. 927) of York’, Saga-book of the Viking Society, 25 (1998-2001), 86-87. Maybe he covers all this in his paper?--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 04:37, 30 March 2010 (UTC)
Actually, scratch that. I was just reading up on Sitriuc Cam/Cammán, he sure doesn't seem to be the same person as Sihtric Cáech. All the Sihtrics and Óláfrs are confusing!--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 06:18, 30 March 2010 (UTC)
Throw in all the Ivars and Gofraids and the confusion is complete... ;) Breeze's article (well, note anyway) is available here, it doesn't add much besides discussion cáech vs cláen and doesn't mention either gále or the "victorious meaning" of caech. Sorry to have added to confusion here. Best regards, Finn Rindahl (talk) 09:16, 30 March 2010 (UTC)
Thanks for the link. I didn't notice the a free version when I Googled the title.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 09:42, 30 March 2010 (UTC)
Nice work on Cammán! Finn Rindahl (talk) 11:09, 30 March 2010 (UTC)

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DYK nomination of Alwyn MacArchill

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Olvir Rosta

Hi Brianann MacAmhlaidh, A fine article and now a Good Article. Congratulations. 14:53, 7 April 2010 (UTC)

Dubgaill and Findgaill

Re your comment at Early Scandinavian Dublin: it should be possible indeed to make an article on this. There's some stuff in Downhams "Viking Kings" (particularly pp xvi ff), she elaborates the Norwegian/Danish stuff in this article [4]. I don't have the extensive recent works by Dumville on this, but it is mentioned in his article in "The Viking World" (ISBN 10: 0–415–33315–6) called "Vikings in insular chronicling". If you want to try to create such an article, I'd be happy to help. Best regards, Finn Rindahl (talk) 12:04, 13 April 2010 (UTC)

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Mackenzie (surname)

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Paul Mactire

Just wanted to say well done on your Paul Mactire article. You must have worked really hard on that. I myself have written a number of articles on middle ages Scotsmen. Mostly on the chiefs of the Clan Munro. I think the best one I did was Robert Mor Munro, 15th Baron of Foulis. QuintusPetillius (talk) 16:07, 29 April 2010 (UTC)

Hi there I would be interested in the book: Alba: Celtic Scotland in the Middle Ages but theres no need to email me, just tell me the little bit about Donald Munro. I live in London and sometimes visit the British Library to read books about the Scottish clans. I usually make notes and then contribute to Wikipedia. Off the top of my head articles I have done this for are Clan Sutherland, Clan Sinclair, Clan Mackay, Clan Grant etc...QuintusPetillius (talk) 16:10, 30 April 2010 (UTC)

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Hi, would you be so kind as to give us support!

Hello, I hope you're doing fine and I sincerely apologize for this spiky intrusion. I've just read your profile and saw that you're a Scotsman proud of his origins (I went to Edinburgh not that long ago and I really appreciated the people and the wonderful place! Beautiful and really nice!), so I guess that being Scottish helps you understand what are an endangered language and culture and maybe I am not bothering you and you will help us... I'm a member of a Catalan association "Amical de la Viquipèdia" which is trying to get some recognition as a Catalan Chapter but this hasn't been approved up to that moment. We would appreciate your support, visible if you stick this on your first page: Wikimedia CAT. Supporting us will be like giving equal opportunity to minorized languages and cultures in the future! Thanks again, wishing you a great summer, take care! Keep on preserving your great culture, country and language! Mar sin leibh! Capsot (talk) 15:45, 14 June 2010 (UTC)

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Lewis Chessmen

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For locating an outstanding source on the Lewis Chessmen. This seemed the most appropriate way of thanking you. As this is my first time straying from the literary sources into Scottish archaeology, being directed to such a thorough, recent and revisionist study is much appreciated. I also had a glance at your list of articles and noticed some good work on a running Scottish/Norse-Gael theme - it's good to see a fellow medievalist dedicated to so important a topic. With gratitude, --Grimhelm (talk) 00:24, 20 June 2010 (UTC)

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Robert de Munro

Thanks for nominating my article Robert de Munro, 8th Baron of Foulis. I'm glad that someone out there thinks its woth it. Thanks. QuintusPetillius (talk) 16:17, 6 July 2010 (UTC)

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Steven L. Akins

That entry caught my eye the other day, and I noticed your exchanges with him. What an extraordinary story. I'm a bit busy these days, but I'll look into this sooner rather than later. Thanks for the informative post. MarmadukePercy (talk) 06:53, 14 July 2010 (UTC)

Thanks Marmaduke. Just moments ago, I posted about him on the Wikipedia:Reliable sources/Noticeboard. It's getting me down a bit, I want to spend my time on other articles, but I'm certain misinformation is creeping into that article.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 07:06, 14 July 2010 (UTC)
I did just find that there was a "Thomas Akins" buried at the "Steele Creek Presbyterian Church" in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina (Charlotte is the county seat).[5] No indication from this source about any 'coat-of-arms' on the stone. I'll keep looking into it. I have some nagging reservations also. ;-) MarmadukePercy (talk) 07:17, 14 July 2010 (UTC)
I don't put much faith in these sorts of websites, but this one claims that Akins's (who, incidentally, appears to have been born in Maryland) headstone at Steele Creek "bears the Akins coat-of-arms on front and on back the Scottish thistle."[6] MarmadukePercy (talk) 07:26, 14 July 2010 (UTC)
More interestingly, here is a poster on the Stormfront website claiming a connection to this same family, and citing the same gravestone.[7] The poster claims that emblazoning headstones with coats-of-arms was "a fairly common practice in the Carolinas in the 1700s." (That most certainly was not the case.) MarmadukePercy (talk) 07:31, 14 July 2010 (UTC)
Actually it was the case, at least around Charlotte and the surrounding vicinity. You might want to check the following flickr photostream of various 18th century gravestones, many of which bear full heraldic achievements: http://www.flickr.com/search/?q=bigham&w=71753167%40N00 --Wyvren (talk) 22:42, 29 July 2010 (UTC)
Look at that Master Baphomet's earlier comments. He introduces Akins book, claiming to have just acquired it [8]. And talks of Akins in the third person. But later, [9] reveals that his is Akins himself! So he is a liar to his racist friends.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 07:37, 14 July 2010 (UTC)
I think there very well could be a stone of the Thomas, engraved with a coat of arms. But I think the illustrated arms of "Akins of that Ilk" is imaginary. I think he made up the colours, and turned the birds to ravens to make it more Norse/Heathen. Thomas' stone is supposedly verified in two printed sources, but Wyvren refuses to quote what those sources actually say of it. Search on rec.heraldry [10] for "Steele Creek", or Akins related things. The cemetery apparently has many engravings with supporters; one tombstone even has the coat of arms of the Duke of Argyll! I suspect reliable sources mentioning the cemetery would be of the opinion that the arms were made up, and the supporters mean nothing.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 07:37, 14 July 2010 (UTC)
Here is the website for the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Historic Landmark Commission for the Steele Creek Presbyterian Church and Cemetery.[11] I'm not familiar with the church, but it is apparently an early one in the region. I suspect you're right. The tombstone obviously exists. Much of the rest, including various quotes attributed to places like The Oxford University Dictionary of American Family Names, are fabricated. I figured when I saw the Stormfront connection that something was up. ;-) I'll look into it a bit more: I'm familiar with that part of the world. MarmadukePercy (talk) 08:12, 14 July 2010 (UTC)
If you haven't seen this particular thread, take a look at the post of April 22, 2004, which begins: "The question of Steven Lewis Akins is a vexed topic for many of us here. He used to be an occasional particpant here before he was exposed as a fraud, and besides his fraudulent claims to be the chief of a non-existent clan, he was an outspoken racial bigot. Sean Murphy exposed him as a crude forger of wills and he appears further to be a forger of tombstone photographs." [12] MarmadukePercy (talk) 08:39, 14 July 2010 (UTC)
In response to the request for verification of the Akins coat of arms, I went to the library and photographed the pages from the book A History of Steele Creek Presbyterian Church 1745-1978 that pertain to the tombstone of Thomas Akins who is buried in the cemetery. I have uploaded photographs of the pages from the book onto photobucket, they can be viewed at: http://s1038.photobucket.com/albums/a470/the_scotsman1745/Genealogical%20records/?action=view&current=steele_creek_01.jpg and http://s1038.photobucket.com/albums/a470/the_scotsman1745/Genealogical%20records/?action=view&current=008.jpg I have also been in contact with a Mr. John Cox in Charlotte, N.C. who is a photographer that posts photos on Flickr. He has a photograph of the back of Thomas Akins' tombstone on his photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/johnncox/4061843066/ and has agreed to take a new photograph of the front of the monument showing the coat of arms in better detail.
In addition there is a court record relating to Thomas Akins death that is recorded in the Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, Minutes of the Probate Court, which reads as follows: 1785. September Session "Ordered that Letters of Administration on the Estate of Thomas Akins, Decd., issue to William Akins who produces Hugh Parks as Security, bound in £600, Administrators Sworn."--Wyvren (talk) 17:19, 29 July 2010 (UTC)


At this point this whole fabrication business is so outlandish as to be amusing – except that it apparently is now being perpetrated on wikipedia. On the thread I posted to you, one of the longtime posters points out that he exposed this document as fraudulent.[13] (Post by Sean Murphy, March 22, 2004, 5:39 p.m.) I've never seen anything quite like this. Czar Brodie will certainly have something to say, and the appropriate admins should be alerted, I think. This is pushing things a bit too far. MarmadukePercy (talk) 21:17, 14 July 2010 (UTC)

I found one legitimate academic website which has a few photographs of gravestones from the church at Steele Creek. Two are certainly heraldic. There's no photograph of the Akins headstone, unfortunately. [14] MarmadukePercy (talk) 00:38, 15 July 2010 (UTC)
This just gets more stunning the more I learn. Apparently many of the graves in the Steele Creek cemetery were the creative efforts of a family of headstone carvers named Bigham, who, I suppose, must have had an armorial text handy.[15] In any event, the gentleman who apparently concocted 'the Akins Clan' has an actual street address in Jasper, Alabama. I have a feeling that a checkuser search on a certain poster on wikipedia might match up with that. ;-) MarmadukePercy (talk) 02:16, 15 July 2010 (UTC)
Look at this [16], and here's a bit of discussion about a suspected sock [17]. Google the first part of the email address in the first link (not the @blah.com part) in quotes, plus a certain city with an abbreviated state (all in quotes like the email): the first link on Google is an old Ebay auction click it, look at the username and location that pops up [18]. Surely a coincidence. Which admin should I got to, or what board should I take this too? My post on the reliable sources noticeboard posting doesn't seem to be getting the point across. It's a hard case to describe clearly! The talkpage of the article is hard to digest, someone has to wade through all that. He just puts up walls of words about things not even related to my questions, like the latest reply concerning chiefs and Lyon. There is one findagrave pic of the front of the tombstone that doesn't look edited [19], but it is really hard to see much of the engraving. I don't see any evidence of hatching. I can see a bit of the 'lion'; but the surrounding shield is flat, there are no lines to represent 'gules'.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 04:41, 15 July 2010 (UTC)
Hello again. I was just about to write a response to you when I noticed your message to Doug. (His talk page is on my watch list.) I agree with what you said to him. There is little question what's going on here, and the longer this nonsense stays on wikipedia, the dumber we'll all look. I hope this is resolved soon, as it leaves a bad taste in the mouth. Thanks again for your initial post on the message board. I'd been watching your conversations with him and the editing on that page and something just didn't smell right. MarmadukePercy (talk) 05:22, 15 July 2010 (UTC)
It looks like Doug is on this, and I trust him to get it fully resolved. Thanks again for bringing this to the attention of the community. Hopefully now you can get back to what you were doing before this nonsense started. :-) MarmadukePercy (talk) 22:05, 15 July 2010 (UTC)
I hope so, thanks Marmaduke. No sign of Wyvren slowing down though: the etymologies are skewed again. Now he's referencing something called: The Clan Akins: A History of the Clan Akins published by the Clan Akins Society, 1996. Why am I not surprised.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 04:31, 16 July 2010 (UTC)
Obviously, this promises to be an on-going problem. I have noticed unexplained reversions by Wyvren, blanking of his own talk page, and removal of the comments of other editors without explanation. MarmadukePercy (talk) 20:58, 18 July 2010 (UTC)
Yep, it's not encouraging. I think the next step is taking it to Wikipedia:Third opinion.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 06:50, 19 July 2010 (UTC)
At the very least, I should say. Also, I was encouraged to see that Czar Brodie is now involved. He knows this stuff backwards and forwards, to put it mildly, and I suspect we'll soon see some resolution. MarmadukePercy (talk) 20:48, 20 July 2010 (UTC)
The third opinion went well too. I guess it's always better to keep things as simple as possible: as a matter of reliable sources. Funny how even HelloAnnyong suspects Wyvren may have a COI!--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 07:28, 22 July 2010 (UTC)
I just Googled one of the recently added sentences added by Wyvren: "Other instances of its use occur in the early records of Scotland where the surname is seen to have undergone a variety of transformations in spelling, accounting for the many variant forms of the name still seen today". It turned up a crest badge for sale on Ebay by a user called "master_baphomet" from Jasper, Alabama [20]. The photo is the exact one uploaded by Wyvren, whose IP address is from Jasper, Alabama [21].--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 06:02, 26 July 2010 (UTC)
Bingo. MarmadukePercy (talk) 17:29, 27 July 2010 (UTC)
Further bingo: the user Wyvren has now taken to editing the Stormfront (website) piece [22]. MarmadukePercy (talk) 03:08, 29 July 2010 (UTC)
Sherlock! Congradulations on mastering the Google search feature. So, what does my position as a White Rights advocate and an anti Semitic Supremacy activist have to do with editing here on Wikipedia? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Wyvren (talkcontribs) 16:19, 29 July 2010 (UTC)
Asks the man who removed 21 references from an article about a white supremacist website, without a single comment or edit summary in explanation.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 08:04, 30 July 2010 (UTC)

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Donald Gregory

Many thanks for your kind comments and also for the most interesting article, which looks as if it will indeed be a valuable further source of reference. 45ossington (talk) 19:36, 20 July 2010 (UTC)

Akins

Hey. I've started a thread on ANI about Wyvren on Talk:Akins. The conversation is at Wikipedia:Administrators' noticeboard/Incidents#Tendentiousness on Akins if you'd like to contribute. — HelloAnnyong (say whaaat?!) 15:05, 22 July 2010 (UTC)

Thanks! It is totally disheartening having to deal with an editor like that, all alone. I think Ncmvocalist is probably right, it's not over yet. I'm gonna try and get Black's surname book out of the library, and scan the relevant names, so I know exactly what is said. Thanks for taking up the third opinion. I was worried that whoever volunteered to do it would have their eyes glaze over while reading all the bluster on the talkpage. You re-added the Dictionary of American Family Names. According to Wyvren, it says something like "Akins, Akin - variant of Aiken; dweller near Akin, a strait in Scotland named after King Hakon of Norway" (that's the quote he gave). But Ancestry.com has a surname-lookup page that cites that exact book, and it does not give the 'Haakon/strait' etymology for any of those names [23].--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 07:33, 23 July 2010 (UTC)
The page on Ancestry gives excerpts from the Oxford Dictionary of American Family Names. The page cited by Wyvern is apparently made up out of whole cloth – as it appears, is most of the rest of the piece. MarmadukePercy (talk) 18:55, 24 July 2010 (UTC)

The book I cited as a reference is The Dictionary of American Family Names by Elsdon C. Smith, published by Harper & Row, 1956. It is a completely different book from the one that you refer to. Your accusation that I am making anything up is completely unfounded - check my sources. --Wyvren (talk) 02:44, 29 July 2010 (UTC)

The problem is that you cited: Dictionary of American Family Names, published by Oxford University Press, with the ISBN 0-19-508137-4. Here's your edit [24].--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 04:40, 30 July 2010 (UTC)

Followup

Since you previously offered an opinion at Akins, I would appreciate it if you could continue to contribute to the discussion. The Wikipedia:Dispute resolution process relies on editors such as yourself offering their opinions, and any help you can give would be much appreciated. As an administrator who's attempting to ensure that all parties follow policy, I will not be involving myself in content discussions other than to discuss policy. Thanks in advance, SHEFFIELDSTEELTALK 15:58, 25 July 2010 (UTC)

I haven't given up, I was just away for a bit.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 05:49, 26 July 2010 (UTC)

Cotters

Hi there. I wanted to draw your attention to a family that has been neglected and is immensely lonely. They are the Cotter Baronets and their relations and the family is definitely of some Norse extraction. I have only just discovered them and written the section on their origins. Enough people know about my people the O'Donovans but in our case we're still really Gaels, more or less. Most of the other Norse families in Ireland are extinct or nearly so. The Cotters are also a proud family of true substance and heroism which must make it even harder out there. They have no one to belong to. You cannot imagine how isolated this region of Ireland was until only recently and it is truly, truly amazing they're still there, and in good health. Wow. DinDraithou (talk) 02:40, 23 July 2010 (UTC)

Ah, I was going to mention something to you the other day, but i thought it too silly. Oh well, here goes. I saw what you wrote on the talkpage, about the good Cork source you came across. That actually sparked my interest. Sometimes I fiddle around on ysearch, and I've noticed that some of the Lewis Macaulays seem to related to numerous O'Learys [25]. Just the sheer numbers that pop up. Other Munster names pop up too, like McCarthy, McAuliffe, and Sullivan caught my eye (a few with Kelly too). Just the other day, when you mentioned Auliffe O'Leary, I immediately thought of that. Could it be that a Munsterman with the name Auliffe founded the Lewis clan and left his name? Or is the Auliffe thing just a coincidence, and the relation way to far in the past to be meaningful? The article on the O'Leary's says that they were a professional family. One of the main families on Lewis were the Lewis Morrisons, who were the breives on the island (the Morrisons are first recorded in the 1500s, I think). I've read that chief breives of the Lords of the Isles are thought to have been based on Lewis as well. Anyway, I wonder if there is any evidence of some sort of Munster-Hebridean connection, concerning learned families, or something like that. Obviously Auliffe was an mediaeval name of the McCarthys, hence the McAuliffes, but do you know if it used in the O'Leary family before the 1600s? I think that the only thing I've read of the Cotters, is what MacLysaght said of the name. He didn't go into the family at all, I don't think; he just noted the name, and said that a name doesn't necessarily show a families ancestry. I quite like the name though. I've read of a MacCotter in Hebridean tradition, who was the flag bearer for either the MacLeans or MacLeods; there was something about him and a duel, I think. I'll have to check that. I wonder if he was related to the Cork family.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 08:20, 23 July 2010 (UTC)
That is fascinating. I don't know about any links of that kind, but the O'Learys were the wardens of an ancient monastery until maybe 1300. Between maybe 1200 and 1550 we have absolutely no idea of what they were doing besides moving north to Muskerry and building several castles, and apparently making decent money as landlords. One of their pedigrees is printed by O'Hart,[26] and in it there does appear to be another Auliffe seven generations back. I think we can disregard the spelling because his descendant's name was anglicized Auliffe, not Aulay. On the ancient connections between Munster and Scotland, they are rumored to be extensive. Not only did the Dál Riata claim to come from Munster and be related to the Corcu Duibne (great seafarers) among others, but the later House of Óengus, or whatever it's called, claimed kinship with the Eóganachta! So there was something going on early and the matches could derive from that. Finally the O'Learys did belong to the Corcu Loígde, who were distantly related to the Corcu Duibne and were also great seafarers. DinDraithou (talk) 22:21, 23 July 2010 (UTC)
Found it: The Hebridean Connection: Accounts and Stories of the Uist Sennachies (1984), p.106 (a really good book, if you've got Hebridean roots). It mentions a sennachie's account of a Hebridean expedition to Orkney, that supposedly place in the late 1400s. "At first they came on furiously, but being as bravely resisted, they fell back in confusion, on which a great slaughrer ensued, for rhe common people there are said to be no great warriors, whatever their gentry are. One of their best soldiers, called Gibbon, was killed. The Earl of Orkney himself was killed, single hand, by one of William MacLeod of Harris's men, called Murdo MacCotter, who was afterwards MacLean's ensignbearer. Having routed the enemy, Austin and his party began to ravage the country, that being the only reward they had for their pains and fatigue; with which having loaded their galleys, returned home." However, I'm not sure that MacCotter actually killed the Earl of Orkney, because I can't find any evidence that one from that period was killed by Hebrideans! Here's the MacLeod mentioned: William Dubh MacLeod. Maybe the dead earl refers to this one: Henry I Sinclair, Earl of Orkney, but that would be before the time William Dubh and Hugh (yet William Dubh had a predecessor of the same name). Garbled traditions... but I think they can be more interesting that way. More fun to think about.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 09:48, 23 July 2010 (UTC)
Wow. You are brilliant and this could not be more perfect. The family claim to descend from Óttar of Dublin, who was King of Dublin from 1142 to 1148. This gives them both a warlike quality and a Hebridean connection. I think we have a winner. Oh wonderful. DinDraithou (talk) 22:01, 23 July 2010 (UTC)

Found him

See my masterpiece in User_talk:Urselius#Looking_forward_to_it. DinDraithou (talk) 16:20, 24 July 2010 (UTC)

Haha. I'm not an expert. I'm just having fun, the Norse-Gaelic families are interesting to me as well. I'm glad to be able to help! When I worked on Olvir Rosta, one of the refs I used was:
  • Williams, Gareth (2007), "'These people were high-born and thought a lot of themselves': A family of Moddan of Dale", in Smith, Beverley Ballin; Taylor, Simon; Williams, Gareth, West Over the Sea: Studies in Scandinavian Sea-Borne Expansion and Settlement Before 1300. (the last one listed)
Williams tries to connect Olvir's great-uncle Óttar of Thurso to the Óttar of Dublin. Williams, notes that while Óttar was fairly common Norse name, it was clearly a dynastic name within the Irish Sea family. So it's something I think you'll be interested in. If you Google hard enough you can probably find West Over the Sea (like I did); if not I can email you the pdf (8mb). The first half of the paper is about Olvir and his family, the second half gets into Óttars of the Irish Sea zone.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 07:13, 26 July 2010 (UTC)
That is great! But I can't find it with Google! I would love to read it and do a little more for the Cotters at Wikipedia. They won't be kings again but it can't hurt their pride.
What's silly about all this is that Ottir Iarla was so easy to connect to the Cotters it has almost certainly been done before privately, but remains unpublished. CGG is an extremely well known work, and can be relied upon in this case, for the association with Cork. I agree with you and Williams we are looking at a dynastic name, like Ímar or Ragnall. Why the family have not demanded more recognition is beyond me, but maybe they are trapped in the baronetcy and aren't sure what to do, but want to keep some "title". Understandable. But most people don't realize that's a non-title, meant for nameless gentry. Originally baronetcies were for purchase, may still be secretly. They should lose it and style themselves like proper chiefs. A Norse family should be able to do that too, don't you think? With the available evidence they can prove their ancient nobility, I think. Plus they're popular. A notable example of a popular chief who has effectively dropped his continental titles is Hugo Ricciardi O'Neill, Prince of Clanaboy. Really they're not good enough for ancient immemorial nobility, who are able to style themselves counts or earls if they choose to. "Count" Randal MacDonnell of the Glens (Clan Donald) is currently doing that, just so people get that he can do that apparently. I read he's miffed some of his family for styling himself chief but nobody is stopping him. That's the attitude. Anyway you probably have no interest in any of my venting about the Irish situation. Doesn't concern me either but I made the mistake of learning something about it. And I genuinely feel sorry for the Cotters. Munster was nice until the middle of the tenth century. Hell ever since. Perpetual large scale war and famine destroyed most of it. Single most devastated and isolated and lawless region in the two big islands. Occasional cannibalism. Those people deserve something special for surviving that epoch as a family, and prospering. For example see Desmond Rebellions#Aftermath. They could not have picked a worse place to live in. DinDraithou (talk) 18:35, 26 July 2010 (UTC)
I emailed the thing to you. In the popular books I've read on Irish families, I've noticed that there is a bias against the 'incomers'. Like the Anglo-Norman families are still today somehow less 'Irish' than Gaelic families. A total contrast to how the Anglo-Norman/Flemish families of Scotland are perceived. The Bruces and Stewarts, Douglas etc., are about as 'Scottish' as a family can be, yet they only crossed the border in about the 12th century (or whatever). I guess the incomers to Scotland helped support the kingdom, while the incomers in Ireland originally took lands from the kingdoms; but still ... the bias is silly today. I guess the Cotters are a little unlucky, in that their original name has taken the form of an uninspiring English name (no disrespect to the English Cotters! haha).--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 08:11, 27 July 2010 (UTC)
I feel sorry for them partly because their ancestry was maligned for so long, and still sometimes is popularly. There were a couple epics written in the early twelfth century by Irish dynasties for political purposes, these being the Cogad Gáedel re Gallaib of the O'Briens and the Caithréim Chellacháin Chaisil of the MacCarthys. The first was propaganda intended to show the O'Briens as victorious as possible against a "foreign" foe because their political position was not the best at the time. The second was the MacCarthy answer to the O'Briens. However the result was that the fearsomeness of the Norse was exaggerated to an exceptional degree... but then again it was still only in literature and it's not like everyone read in those times. A few decades later came the Norman invasion of Ireland. While before that there was actually a fair amount of intermarriage between the Irish and Norse, with plenty of Norse names appearing in (some) Irish dynasties, after that event there is almost none. The Norse towns and settlements were occupied by the Normans and the people were eventually destroyed utterly as a cultural entity, even if not harassed so much as were the Gaels. Many probably just sailed out but the existence of others is noted for quite some time. At some point their memories of earlier times were all lost because they did not form into proper clans, and were not in a position to if they wanted. Some may have tried, for all we know now. Clans have their own historians and other methods for preserving some of their history through the ages. But clans need lands to thrive on and those were virtually all taken. DinDraithou (talk) 03:05, 28 July 2010 (UTC)
Thanks for all the help with the Ottar/Cotter story. Apparently Cotter/Cottier (from MacCottier) is also a Manx name http://www.isle-of-man.com/manxnotebook/manxnb/v10p053.htm which fits in to the Ottar "sagas" very nicely.Urselius (talk) 20:25, 27 July 2010 (UTC)
No problem, I'm glad to help.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 06:06, 30 July 2010 (UTC)

Óttar the Black

Ottir Iarla. DinDraithou (talk) 05:51, 25 July 2010 (UTC)

Óttar of Dublin

Hello again. We have a fine new article by User:Urselius and there are a few questions about Óttar's successors. I have done some research, which can be found in Talk:Óttar of Dublin. Would greatly appreciate your help. DinDraithou (talk) 15:51, 1 August 2010 (UTC)

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Akins at RS

Hello again. Wasn't sure whether you are around or not, but you will want to see this. Wikipedia:Reliable sources/Noticeboard‎#Akins coat of arms MarmadukePercy (talk) 18:40, 1 August 2010 (UTC)

Thanks Marmaduke. I left a note there.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 07:22, 2 August 2010 (UTC)

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DYK for Gofraid Donn

The DYK project (nominate) 12:03, 4 August 2010 (UTC)

Ímar Ua Donnubáin

I still do not have Collins' pedigree of the family, but I now have a wonderful new source, the account of an old storyteller! I hope you are still following the article! DinDraithou (talk) 17:47, 7 August 2010 (UTC)

I tried searching for a photo of the castle at http://www.geograph.org.uk, but had no luck. Unfortunately the Irish coverage on that site is pretty sparse.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 06:53, 9 August 2010 (UTC)
Thank you for trying! What I am doing is trying to resurrect an old legend nearly everyone has forgotten about today, but which appears to have still been popular in the 19th century. I don't know what happened and why he has nearly been forgotten. The O'Donovans are still propertied and numerous in the area, but have done a poor job of writing about themselves, or getting written about. But there is plenty out there. I'm finding material everywhere which no one else seems to be using. So it finally happens in Wikipedia.
I think it's because we still have a Chief and properties and plenty of noble progeny (not including me, sadly) and for this reason are dismissed and locally disliked. We don't belong to club of the mighty who have fallen. If you are interested our superstar Donnubán mac Cathail now has an article. I'm surprised he didn't acquire the name "Donovan of the Longphorts" since he appears to have spent more time there than anywhere else. I'll bet you there are 100,000 people descended from him and half of them speak Scandinavian. So far as I know I am writing his first biography.
Btw I love what you have written about Olvir Rosta. Because of its length and complexity I have delayed reading it but have just now read the beginning and now background section. You might note in it now that the family of Óttar of Dublin were related! DinDraithou (talk) 20:56, 9 August 2010 (UTC)
That's kinda how the article on Olvir started. I thought it would be fun to write about him, because of a possibility, raised by a lone Victorian antiquarian, about how Olvir could be the founder of a clan or two on Lewis. So the character and setting captured my imagination, but I didn't think the article would be much more than the clan-thing, yet the whole thing blossomed, and I learned that the clan stuff is really only a small piece of Olvir's story. But no one seems to care about the guy, Matheson isn't around any more, Olvir has almost no presence on the net, so maybe I'm the only one interested! I think it's too bad that the MacLeods and their clan society still cling to the mistaken belief that they come from Olaf the Black [27], when the man they ought to be looking for is, if not Olvir Rosta, then a someone who shared the same name and possibly the same 'aura'. Matheson summed it up perfectly: "On the one hand, the MacLeods cannot be lineally descended from Olaf the Black. His name (in Gaelic Amhlaoibh) is conspicously absent from the old Gaelic genealogies, and was never mentioned until the seventeenth century, who, as a result of reading Camden’s Britannia, Olaf (in Latin Olavus) was wrongly taken to be the same as Olbhar, a name that does appear in these genealogies. On the other hand, there is good evidence, of the circumstantial kind, that this Olbhar, always acknowledged by the MacLeods as an ancestor of reknown, is to be identified as Olvir Rósta, described in the saga as “the tallest of men, and strong of limb, exceedingly overbearing, and a great fighter;” a man in the heroic mould, long to be celebrated by poets as fit progenitor of a warrior race."
So it was a lot of fun working on that one. I guess some of the topics that some of us happen to be interested in are considered to be merely cruft to others. But, that's the awesome thing about Wikipedia, people can easily find those obscure articles once you make them. Way back I made an article about a hushed-up Viking hoax/controversy in Canada (Beardmore Relics), and just the other day an IP posted a thanks for telling the real story behind the thing, saying he is descended from on of the guys involved [28][29]! I left a note on his talkpage, but the guy's IP address appears to be dynamic, so it switches and I doubt he will have gotten the message. But I got a kick out of that! Haha. Archive.org is an amazing resource. Not too long ago it was possible to easily search all their books for words or phrases, here: [30]. But since they recently revamped the website that search function hasn't been available! That was the most powerful and useful feature! A blog posting from July says they are planning on bringing that back in the "next 4 months" [31].--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 08:27, 10 August 2010 (UTC)
Shortly after reading your reply I discovered the tragedy that the Clan MacLeod no longer have a genuine chief, but a Lord Lyon approved nobody who has changed his name to MacLeod. What is allowed to go on in Scotland now is appalling. The same has happened to Clan Mackenzie, Clan Maclachlan, Clan Munro, and most awfully to Clan MacDougall, who are of royal extraction. I'm sure there are others.
If I may join in, I think it is a bit hard to describe the present Macleod as a "Lord Lyon approved nobody". He is the great grandson of Dame Flora Macleod, he owns Dunvegan and about 40,000 acres of ancient Macleod territory on Skye and he is generally accepted by the world (and not just by Lord Lyon, whose opinion in these matters I agree counts for little) as chief of the clan. His great fault may be that he has inherited through the female line, but is that really to be considered "appalling" in the 21st century?45ossington (talk) 07:18, 11 August 2010 (UTC)
The Mackeznie situation seems so ridiculous. Maybe the Lord Lyon is right, and that by the Law of Arms, the new line are the rightful holders of the chiefly arms, but the societies should never have recognised someone whose most recent Mackenzie ancestor lived in the 1700s. How can someone be considered to be in the same family after so long, with such a jumbled up ancestry. I think I tried connecting the same dots, the same twists and turns in my own family tree, and it came out to one of my mom's Palatine German ancestors who were settled in New York! Crazy! The Macleod/Maclachlan thing is different because the first of the new lines knew and loved the last of the old lines. So it is still within the family. Totally agree with you on that point 45ossington.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 07:41, 11 August 2010 (UTC)
In Ireland and Europe they would not be recognized. A Gaelic chiefship is not something that can be inherited that way. There is no descent through the female line. These may be so-called chiefs in the modern United Kingdom but nowhere else do they have any standing. Those arms are not theirs and can easily be reclaimed by an aggressive male line descendant, and might be in the future. They are not noble persons and can be pushed out. That they currently own the estates is meaningless. The women from whom they inherited had no authority to grant them chiefly status. DinDraithou (talk) 13:12, 11 August 2010 (UTC)
"These may be so-called chiefs in the modern United Kingdom but nowhere else do they have any standing." That raises what seems to me an interesting question. If an individual is generally regarded in the modern UK as a chief despite inheritance through the female line, to what extent is it sensible to regard mediaeval Gaelic law (about which I do not pretend to know much) as determinative against that individual's status? I can see that it might make sense to adopt the position that "chiefship" is a meaningless notion in the modern world, but if chiefship does have a significance in the modern world, why should it be wrong to recognise modern developments in identifying a chief? How about the following analogy? Assume for present purposes that the present-day heir to Henry Benedict Stuart is someone other than Elizabeth II. A Jacobite fanatic might argue that the Jacobite heir should be king, but why should an appeal to the law of England prior to 1689 trump what is now the universally recognised fact of Queen Elizabeth's sovereignty? If a chief is a chief "in the modern United Kingdom", does it matter if he would have no standing, either elsewhere in Europe, or indeed in 16th century Scotland? An interesting example at one end of the spectrum is the present chief of Clan Mackinnon, who is descended from an Antiguan with no proven link to the chiefly family of Mackinnon at all. At the other end of the spectrum, it would be bizarre to identify the chief of Macleod as the innocent and unsuspecting occupant of, say, a small terraced house in Auckland, NZ, rather than the present incumbent of Dunvegan. Anyway, apologies for droning on, but I do think that the questions of legitimacy raised by your post are difficult as well as interesting.45ossington (talk) 14:22, 11 August 2010 (UTC)
I have only just discovered Chiefs of Clan MacLeod from the post below and did not realize there was a legitimate chief. I thought you were making that up. The article is corrected and this noble person now has an important defender here. DinDraithou (talk) 16:44, 11 August 2010 (UTC)
In order to avoid trespassing further on your patience with this uninvited discussion, I am continuing it at User talk:DinDraithou. Many thanks anyway.45ossington (talk) 17:45, 11 August 2010 (UTC)
I think the case for Olvir Rosta or the figure who inspired that character is good. Here you have someone with quite a career, whatever it actually was in truth, perfectly suited to leave his seed with a substantial number of women and perhaps even start a proper family. Naturally he is less attractive than a son of Olaf the Black because of his non-royal lineage but Olvir can still be regarded as a person of warlike quality and probably some substance. That much is clear enough, or we wouldn't know about him or be discovering his name anywhere. His portrayal in the saga could be better. Finally I love archive.org and look there when I can't find anything in Google books, which I am more used to. I didn't even know about that search function but hope it comes back! DinDraithou (talk) 02:30, 11 August 2010 (UTC)

Barnstar

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The Defender of the Wiki Barnstar
For working hard to make sure editors follow wiki guidelines about veracity. MarmadukePercy (talk) 05:28, 8 August 2010 (UTC)
The whole situation wouldn't have got sorted out if it wasn't for you, HelloAnnyong, Doug, and Brodie. When you first left me a message here I was so frustrated because I was pretty much certain what that guy was up to, and what his motives were, but I didn't know how to make others aware it. Like you said before, the whole back-story is so odd and somewhat amusing, but actually dealing with it here on Wikipedia is another thing. So thanks for the support here. I'd better thank HelloAnnyong too, because he really got the gears in motion, and took the the article like a pitbull. hehe--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 06:53, 9 August 2010 (UTC)
You're welcome. It's a pleasure when editors can work together in something like this and it validates some of the [higher] aims of wikipedia. MarmadukePercy (talk) 08:36, 10 August 2010 (UTC)

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Norman 'the Red Man'

Hi you seem to have done alot of work on the Chiefs of Clan MacLeod. I am trying to find information on chief Norman 'the Red Man' 1705 - 1772. I would like to know what he got up to during the Jacobite risings and that sort of era. It would be great if someone could do an article on him. QuintusPetillius (talk) 16:20, 11 August 2010 (UTC)

OK I'll work on an article for him, it shouldn't be a problem, it might not be very thorough though. Funny how the society completely ignores his part in the '45 [32]. One of John L. Robert's books on that period says that he originally said he was going to support the Jacobites, but as soon as Charlie landed in Scotland he was working for the Government. Apparently he ravaged Raasay in the aftermath of rebellion (the MacLeods of Raasay were the ones that took part in Culloden).--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 07:43, 12 August 2010 (UTC)

Peace offering!

Although we were never really at war. What a strange episode. But I just realized you might not have this tract

It contains an interesting MacLeod pedigree, for which see pp. 5-6, 11-12, then read the text. Then do not skip the notes! Much of this Irish material seems unknown in Scotland even today. DinDraithou (talk) 18:33, 12 August 2010 (UTC)

Thanks for that. Is the book/link viewable for you on GoogleBook? For some reason it isn't for me. I've come across that book before on Archive.org, I'll look up those pages there. I have a feeling the MacLeod pedigree isn't actually a MacLeod for some reason, I think I've read somewhere that it may actually be a MacCabe pedigree. I might have confused things though, at least one Irish 'MacLeod' pedigree may be a MacCabe or something like that. I'll look into it more though, so thanks for that! I think I'll try working on the whole slew of MacLeod chiefs. I know many weblinks make Flora the first female chief, but I think the 17th century Mary was the first [33]. The ordering of the chiefs has flopped around in years, and different books/websites have them at different numbers. Mary's will be an interesting article to work on. It fits in with the Talisker thing a bit. I think a real apology to Brodie would help everyone. He never attacked you in the slightest, and he is one of the most polite editors around. I think that when someone gives a halfassed apology, only because they think the other side has given way, it can still be taken as an insult. I don't think he really conceded to you, he just took it to the talkpage so everyone could give their input. Anyway this might help Wikipedia:Personal_attacks#Why_personal_attacks_are_harmful.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 07:43, 14 August 2010 (UTC)
While my opinion wasn't asked for, I would like to say that I agree with Brianann that an apology to Czar Brodie would be a nice step, Din. While I can understand your points about the MacLeods – and admire your determination and grit on the subject – there are few users here more polite and knowledgeable than Czar B. He is a real asset to wikipedia. I'm sure you'll be working alongside him again, and for that reason, I think an apology might go a long way. Just my opinion, but you seem like a nice guy, Din, and I think you should offer a peace branch to Czar. MarmadukePercy (talk) 18:01, 14 August 2010 (UTC)
He made himself a part of the club dismissing MacLeod of Talisker by adding those sources, and it came across rather badly to me. It's easy to go out and find a thousand sources all saying exactly the same little thing and have it not be true. Try following Lady Gaga (it's the stupidest fun you'll have ever). The only article to be found anywhere discussing the succession in any detail happens to be the one about MacLeod of Talisker, and it is little more than three years old. It even quotes specialists. Thus Czar Brodie was intentionally dismissing him with a mess of trivial WP:RECENT sources really saying nothing at all, behavior I don't care for. The only half good one is the website of the Standing Council, but that is not exactly an organization of any consequence and is conveniently located in Scotland. Talisker lives in Australia and I doubt knows a single chief belonging to it. A number of prominent chiefs would appear to refuse to belong to it anyway so its value as a source and reliability are very questionable. If Czar Brodie is genuinely knowledgeable as you say then he actually did something which was rather mean spirited, as have a couple others here. So he ended up being the one. Tough. Also see below about new developments concerning the connections of the Talisker branch. DinDraithou (talk) 00:21, 15 August 2010 (UTC)
Czar Brodie was citing a legion of unsuitable sources, none of which confirmed Hugh Magnus, just puffed him up, and it was genuinely annoying. So I blew up at him, and nothing I said was false. The point is your chief has no lineage and Talisker does not appear to have conceded.
Others seem to have trouble with Google books as well, perhaps because they are less familiar with it. But you can choose to either read the book right there or just download the pdf, like at archive.org. It is a MacLeod pedigree and you should be able to use some of the information in Bugge's notes in the article Leod. DinDraithou (talk) 17:44, 14 August 2010 (UTC)
I think it must be some locational thing. Because for me atleast, that particular link/book says "No preview available". There's no option to view/download like others. Some of the preview books have my IP locked out from reading through them so much, but since this is a free book, I think it must have something to do with my location locking me out. I have no idea what else it could be. I found the refs which cast some doubt on the pedigree. Here Andrew MacLeod says Another, in Duald MacFirbis’s collection of genealogies made in 1650 (the manuscript of which is in University College, Dublin), is also irrelevant: although said to be a genealogy of the MacLeods it is rather a genealogy for the MacCabes. In a footnotes he says: It does have one or two MacLeod touches to it but it has long been recognised as historically worthless for the MacLeods. William F. Skene, “The MacLeods of Scotland”, being pp. 317-320 in Ulster Journal of Archaeology, 1st Series, IX (1861-1862), p. 319, described it as “more like a jeu d’esprit of some Senachaidhe than a pedigree seriously inteded to be taken as authentic.”[34] Here's Sellar: A further pedigree, nominally MacLeod, not shown on Table 2, is also given by MacFirbis, and comes from the tract “On the Fomorians and the Norsemen”. This is a highly inventive genealogy, mostly gobbledygook, which includes Malcolm Canmore, Alpin and Loarn in the generations below Leod, and Scandlain Sgainde (who also appears in pedigree C as Sgoinne Sganlain); Arthur and Alexander, and man others, in the generations above Leod. It finishes in fine style with “Old Ivar the Great of the Judgments, from whom descent the race of Old Ivar in Scotland, Ireland and Scandinavia.” The reference to “Old Ivar” is significant, as emphasizing the general belief in the Scandinavian origins of the MacLeods. [35] Here's the book on Archive.org [36].--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 08:54, 22 August 2010 (UTC)
Barclay of that Ilk
A medieval case of chiefship of a clan passing through a female is Eva heiress of Clan Chattan. Our article on the clan isn't very good, but if you Google it you'll find bits about her. In the 13th or 14th century the heiress of the clan married a Mackintosh, and to this day a Mackintosh is the chief. I don't know anything about it though other than that. A funny one is Clan Barclay, a prominent Scottish scholar, G. W. S. Barrow says that clan scholars never point out that the line of Barclays daughtered out in the 12th century! Since then they've been carrying around an assumed surname. (It has to be said that the Barclays of that Ilk have a really cool coat of arms).--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 09:36, 14 August 2010 (UTC)
Daughtering out is one thing. This is not a case of it. If the Wolriges were Mackintoshes they wouldn't be claiming the chiefship when heirs male still exist. This is a patent case of something else. Apparently they have always been aware of the existence of the Taliskers and are guilty today of trying to bury them. I wish you would stop following their example here at Wikipedia, but I understand because you're connected to them in some way and cannot help experiencing their world. You may view them as aristocracy but I can assure that is not what they are. They only head a modern corporation, not the Clan MacLeod, who live in Australia. The Taliskers are all who are left of the real thing. I hope to get you to see that eventually. DinDraithou (talk) 17:44, 14 August 2010 (UTC)
I think I've read that the Talisker branch has been an unwanted pain in the side of the main line for a long time now. A small example is that in the early 1700s the main line almost died out, when the chief died and left two infant sons. This section, about the Fairy Flag, mentions a Dunvegan tradition regarding the dastardly Taliskers during this period: Fairy Flag#Other episodes. Din, aristocracy and nobility mean absolutely nothing to me. I'm not interested in those things. History and traditional history is what interests me. You hinted that you thought I edit out of a bias, but I have absolutely no connection to the clan or society. I'm not a Lewis Macaulay. I haven't got one MacLeod in my (smallish) family tree. The only man I consider my chief is my dad. ;)--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 08:54, 22 August 2010 (UTC)
It would appear that the 16th Earl of Caithness married one the Taliskers just a century and a half ago,[37] so this family is hardly dead yet. Follow the links. She would appear to have a mess of descendants in the genuine aristocracy. So they are theoretically way more connected than the Wolriges. You just don't see where this is going. Janet MacLeod, great-granddaughter of the 3rd Talisker [recte, 6th],[38] is the great-grandmother of the current Earl, Malcolm Sinclair, 20th Earl of Caithness, PC, and Chief of Clan Sinclair, whom it might be worth contacting. I wonder if they actually know what has gone on. In any case the 3rd/6th of Talisker's 3rd son appears to be the ancestor of the current ones.[39] He and others of the family died in Tasmania. Follow the links and you will eventually find the current rightful chief, Evan Guy,[40] eldest surviving son of Donald Ian Guy, 12th of Talisker. It looks like there are lots of these nobles down there in Australia, or down under, and they won't forget their dismissal by the "Associated Clan MacLeod Societies", I don't think. I can't wait to hear about them. DinDraithou (talk) 00:21, 15 August 2010 (UTC)

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Gleanings in Family History from the Antrim Coast

[41] Concerns your MacAulays. DinDraithou (talk) 19:00, 21 August 2010 (UTC)

Thanks! I've come across that before. The thing is I'm of the Uist MacAulays. We're supposedly independent of the Ardincaple and Lewis clans. AFAIK, oral tradition on Uist is that a couple of MacAulay brothers, from the "Athwart Isles", arrived on Uist with their MacLellan wives sometime in the 1500s, and that is as far back as the clan goes!--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 09:16, 22 August 2010 (UTC)

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Running for admin

Hi, after our work on the Akins entry, I wanted you to know that HelloAnnyong is running for admin. I'm not canvassing in any way, but just thought you'd want to know. Best, MarmadukePercy (talk) 06:58, 1 September 2010 (UTC)

Thanks, I had no idea.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 07:25, 1 September 2010 (UTC)

DYK for Norman MacLeod (The Wicked Man)

The DYK project (nominate) 18:03, 2 September 2010 (UTC)

Lords of the Isles

Talk:John_of_Islay,_Earl_of_Ross#Titles. DinDraithou (talk) 22:16, 4 September 2010 (UTC)

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Douglas of Mains

Arms of Stewart of Stewart
Undifferenced arms of Stewart
Arms of Douglas of Mains
Douglas of Mains
Arms of MacAulay of Ardincaple
MacAulay of Ardincaple
Arms of MacAulay of Ardincaple
MacAulay of Ardincaple

Please consider reviewing a DYK nomination for Douglas of Mains; I think you have the appropriate expertise to verify the hook. Wikiwayman (talk) 12:55, 10 September 2010 (UTC)

OK, I took a crack at it, and left some comments over at DYK. One of the refs might be messed up, I think it is linking to another book. I added a couple refs, one has the verdict and sentencing, written in period Scots. Kinda interesting.
The heraldry is interesting to me too. It's bright and cheery, and it seems like the kind of thing that can be recognised from far away. Is the pictured coat the one that was registered in 1672? Any idea why it features the fess chequy? Is there a Stewart connection somewhere? The MacAulays of Ardincaple were another Dunbartonshire clan that used it as well. The MacAulays are thought to derive their name, and possibly descend, from the old line of Lennox earls, but I wonder if the heraldry may mean they were related to the later Stewart line, the buckles are supposed to be from the Stewarts at least. Thanks for looking over Scottish surnames, BTW.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 08:14, 11 September 2010 (UTC)
Thanks for looking over the article - I wasn't originally sure about "hanged, drawn and quartered" (I'd seen the reference myself) as many contemporary sources are quite over-egged, and didn't know how respected Pitcairns was.
Interesting point about the fess chequy gules on the arms. I don't know where it originated, but I'll look out for any clues. Wikiwayman (talk) 19:12, 12 September 2010 (UTC)
Pitcairn just transcribed the official records, and bundled them all up for the general public. He's used as a source in many books. It's either that or go transcribe the records yourself. The National Archives of Scotland mentions his work here: [42]. So that is the actual verdict and sentencing of Malcolm. It's fun reading some of the cases just for the language of the times and the names. Though, yeah, just because a sentence was given doesn't have to mean the sentence was actually carried out! Though it was high treason he was found guilty of, during a time when Scots were burning witches at the stake, so it doesn't seem unlikely. Browsing through the trials sometime you even come across witch trials! About the Stewarts, seems like the 6th laird married a daughter of Matthew Stewart, 2nd Earl of Lennox [43]. Maybe that has something to do with it, who knows.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 05:51, 13 September 2010 (UTC)
Check out the following family arms - Boyd of Kilmarnock. Of all the arms I've been able to check, this is the best fit. The Stewart check is blue and silver, whereas the Boyd check is red and silver. A daughter of Boyd of Kilmarnock did marry into the Douglas family, but to Lochleven, not Mains, which was already separate by then. The next question is whether there was subsequent intermarriage that brought the "red tablecloth check" to Mains.
There is some intermarriage between Mains and Stewart (as above), but the colours are wrong, and we'd need to explain the change from blue to red. Going the other way, some early Douglasses married with the Clan Crawford in Ayrshire (maybe a Kilmarnock connection there?), but this looks too early; before the family lines separate.
The Houston coat of arms (marriage to 4th Laird) has a check pattern, but again is blue and silver, not red and is formed into a chevron, not a fess. I suspect that I'm coming to a dead end on this! One issue is that it is difficult to find early versions of arms before they were all being registered. If we could do that, we'd be able to link the tablecloth to a wife! Wikiwayman (talk) 12:24, 13 September 2010 (UTC)
I don't think the difference in colours has to be all that big of a deal. I can think of an example from the MacAulays, how another form of the Ardincaple arms (an older form, I think) was yellow and sported a black check. In the case of the Douglases of Mains, I think it might be possible that red was chosen because the upper third of the shield was already blue, the fess checky wouldn't be anywhere near as distinct. It's a great design! Look at this webpage discussing the Stewart fess checky [44][45]. Apparently the Boyds got it from the Stewarts, and the name-father of the Boyds differenced his arms from the basic Stewart coat by changing colours. I noticed that the the colours of the checkys seem to be always [in most cases] different from those of the surrounding shield; so I think that this might be why the heraldry of the Douglases of Mains feature a red one.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 07:44, 14 September 2010 (UTC)
Look at this [46]. I think I was right, according to this author it is from the Stewarts. Also, the seal of the first Douglas of Mains didn't feature the fess checky, but had a saltire instead, and the author thinks that this was gained from his Galbraith wife. The saltire was used by a number of Dumbartonshire clans, the Lennoxes themselves, their cadets the Macfarlanes, also the Colqhuouns, that's all I can think of now. I think it'll be possible to get a bigger picture of the seal, I'll look. So maybe it wasn't a dead end after all.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 07:44, 14 September 2010 (UTC)
One thing though i just noted, when talking about the taking up the Stewart fess checky he says "the Mains family changed the tincture to gules-the old Lennox colour-and or". So, are there different forms of the arms - one with a red and white checky, and one with a red and gold one? Or has the author made a slight boo-boo?--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 08:10, 14 September 2010 (UTC)
Not a mistake, here's an illustration of the arms here: [47]. It's a funeral escutcheon, though I'm not sure who it belonged to, or its date.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 08:31, 14 September 2010 (UTC)
I couldn't access the illustration, but the ref from "The parish of Strathblane...." is good enough for me. I've added the appropriate information to the article. Wikiwayman (talk) 10:30, 14 September 2010 (UTC)

DYK for Scottish surnames

TheDYKUpdateBot 12:03, 12 September 2010 (UTC)

MacDonnell of the Glens

Remember heraldry isn't concerned about how things are drawn, only what they are, and which of... about 8 basic colours they are. For heraldic purposes, the two images are the same. The blue and green are slightly more pastel in the Dunluce image - however, that is permitted - and the basic elements are the same. Ignoring the heraldic language, we have:

Upper left: Red lion on white. Upper right: white fist emerging from clouds, clutching a red cross, on blue. Lower left: black ship on a field with the upper yellow, lower blue. Lower right: Fish [colour a bit small to tell on website, blue and white on the plaque - may be given as whatever the mediaeval French for "natural colouring" is, which gives a bit of leeway] on a field white and green.

Heraldry allows a great deal of artistic interpretation of the elements shown, and all such changes as are seen between the two are perfectly acceptable variations in presentation.

The website image has various things around the shield. These are supporters; their use is decorative, and, while I believe they must be granted to allow them to be used, using them is never required. Adam Cuerden (talk) 17:07, 12 September 2010 (UTC)

Hmm. Good points. DinDraithou said that the MacDonnells who lived at Dunluce are a different branch of the MacDonnells who now live at Glenarm - perhaps the similarities and differences reflect that? I do have the guidebook to Dunluce; I could look it up later (it's currently in the room my father's staying in for a couple more days) to see if it's mentioned. (I also have nearly a thousand pictures of Northern Ireland, mainly Co. Antrim, which I'll need some time to go through. I'm not a bad photographer (though my equipment could be better); given the state of Northern Ireland photography here, I'll bet a lot of them will be better than what we have - and I know Dunluce will be. =) Adam Cuerden (talk) 20:10, 12 September 2010 (UTC)


Maybe the photo shows the arms that were borne by members of the family prior to the title passing through the female line? - I think you have it there. The best thing to do is probably just to mark this one as "historical coat of arms" in the article and add the SVG back in as "modern coat of arms", noting the differences. Adam Cuerden (talk) 00:52, 14 September 2010 (UTC)

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Clan MacAuley of the Glens

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Hello, Brianann MacAmhlaidh. You have new messages at Newm30's talk page.
Message added 14:13, 18 September 2010 (UTC). You can remove this notice at any time by removing the {{Talkback}} or {{Tb}} template.

your edit List of crest badges used by Scottish clan member

I agree with your removal of possil. I was surprised by User:Craigenputtock's edit. This matter has already been disused with Craigenputtock at my talk page and with other editors at Wikipedia_talk:WikiProject_Clans_of_Scotland. My understanding was that there was consensus to not list branch crest badges. Yours ever, Czar Brodie (talk) 12:04, 20 September 2010 (UTC)

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DYK nomination of San Juan de Silicia

Symbol question.svg Hello! Your submission of San Juan de Silicia at the Did You Know nominations page has been reviewed, and there still are some issues that may need to be clarified. Please review the comment(s) underneath your nomination's entry and respond there as soon as possible. Thank you for contributing to Did You Know! Yoninah (talk) 11:08, 27 September 2010 (UTC)

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Chiefs of Clan Mackay

Hi, I have checked my "Book of Mackay" which is really considered the ruling authority on everything Clan Mackay and it lists chief Uistean Mackay (d.1614) as Huistean. So I guess if you add the "H" at the begining then that would be more accurate. As for chief Aodh Mackay (d,1572), the Book of Mackay lists him as Iye Du Mackay which I think is the more accurate name. I will update the list as per the "Book of Mackay" which is the best book on Mackay history as it calls on many previous books including "The House and Clan of Mackay" by Robert Mackay. Cheers. QuintusPetillius (talk) 18:16, 28 September 2010 (UTC)

DYK for San Juan de Silicia

RlevseTalk 18:03, 30 September 2010 (UTC)

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Clann Lugain: mcgorry from maguire

Hi i noticed your addition to the List of Irish clans in Ulster article, however could you please add a source cite to the entry for verifiability? I know the rest don't have one but they all derive from the same sources which are defined at the end of the article. Mabuska (talk) 14:45, 8 October 2010 (UTC)

I didn't add any new content, there was no addition. I just moved the McGorrys into Clann Lugain since the article says they descend from a Maguire. I think you must have been the one who actually wrote that into the article in the first place! I have no idea which source supports this, or if it even has a reliable source, because there is no in-line citation. None of the clans have an citation beside them. If an editor can't remember which source he used when he wrote a specific part of an article, there's no way anyone else will ever know. Some footnotes would really help, I think.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 08:38, 9 October 2010 (UTC)
Ah i see where i went wrong now - i didn't notice you cut it from a previous edit and then did a new edit pasting it in. I assumed you added it as the edit summary comparison didn't make it clear to me. I don't forget what sources i used as the information on each clan etc. derives primarily from the one source, with the information before the tables of each clan deriving from another. A few footnotes wouldn't hurt i suppose. Mabuska (talk) 15:35, 9 October 2010 (UTC)

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Something nice

You are on my list! Check your email. DinDraithou (talk) 09:47, 13 October 2010 (UTC)

Thanks Din. Have you got From Pictland to Alba in pdf form? I can easily send it to you.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 10:37, 13 October 2010 (UTC)
I did not know it comes in pdf. I would love it! Thank you. It's one of those on my list. DinDraithou (talk) 19:47, 13 October 2010 (UTC)
(talk page stalker) Do you mean this book? I would love it myself in PDF form :-) Mabuska (talk) 23:27, 13 October 2010 (UTC)
Send me an email here and I'll send it back as an attachment.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 05:35, 14 October 2010 (UTC)

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Last speaker??

Irish_language_in_Northern_Ireland - second sentence from last in the history section. Any relation? Mabuska (talk) 21:30, 19 October 2010 (UTC)

Haha, not as far as I know. But maybe way back, who knows. I suppose he may be of the this bunch . My people were from the Hebrides.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 09:05, 20 October 2010 (UTC)
Possibility both stem from the same ancester? lol. Thanks for the Pictland to Alba PDF by the way! Mabuska (talk) 10:33, 20 October 2010 (UTC)
I think almost anything is possible if you don't know someone's genealogy, the whole story. Maybe it was only an assumed name! You're welcome.--Brianann MacAmhlaidh (talk) 11:03, 20 October 2010 (UTC)

King of Mumhain

Talk:Ivar of Limerick#King of Munster. Your participation is welcome, and also I give a little review of a new book! See also User talk:Finnrind#Article for my intentions. DinDraithou (talk) 23:30, 20 October 2010 (UTC)

Wikipedia:Requests for comment/Xanderliptak

I have opened an RfC/U on Xanderliptak. Since you have attempted to deal with the concerns that I raise, I have mentioned you in the RfC. The RfC is not yet certified and may not be; currently I am the sole signatory, and any RfC not accompanied by evidence showing that two users tried and failed to resolve the same dispute will be deleted after 48 hours as "uncertified". But I thought you should be made aware. Any feedback will, of course, be most welcome. --Moonriddengirl (talk) 20:28, 24 October 2010 (UTC)

DYK for Randal (given name)

RlevseTalk 00:04, 25 October 2010 (UTC)

The Signpost: 25 October 2010

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