User talk:GeoWriter

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Hello, GeoWriter, and welcome to Wikipedia! Thank you for your contributions. I hope you like the place and decide to stay. Here are some pages that you might find helpful:

I hope you enjoy editing here and being a Wikipedian! Please sign your name on talk pages using four tildes (~~~~); this will automatically produce your name and the date. If you need help, check out Wikipedia:Questions, ask me on my talk page, or ask your question and then place {{helpme}} after the question on your talk page. Again, welcome! --ragesoss 22:15, 1 April 2007 (UTC)

Contents

WikiProject History of Science newsletter : Issue II - May 2007[edit]

The May 2007 issue of the WikiProject History of Science newsletter has been published. You're receiving this because you are a participant in the History of Science WikiProject. You may read the newsletter or unsubscribe from this notification by following the link. Yours in discourse--ragesoss 06:36, 5 May 2007 (UTC)

Oil shale[edit]

Hi. You are listed as a participant in WikiProject Geology. Maybe you to please consider helping to improve the oil shale article. This article has developed quite well, but some more expert assistance is needed. Thank you in advance. Beagel 17:33, 31 May 2007 (UTC)

Thank you adding the age of Scotland torbanite into oil shale article. As we are in the process of splitting this article, I moved this table into oil shale geology article. Maybe you would like to take a look on this article? Beagel 12:23, 28 July 2007 (UTC)
I listed Oil shale for the new peer review and related spin-off articles (Oil shale extraction, Oil shale geology, Oil shale industry, History of the oil shale industry, Oil shale reserves, Oil shale economics, and Environmental effects of oil shale industry) for the peer review. Your comments and edits will be most welcome.Beagel 17:18, 28 August 2007 (UTC)

Wikipedia:Featured article candidates/Geology of solar terrestrial planets[edit]

Hi GeoWriter, kindly support at Wikipedia:Featured article candidates/Geology of solar terrestrial planets. thanks, Sushant gupta 12:42, 9 August 2007 (UTC)

WikiProject History of Science newsletter : Issue III - September 2007[edit]

The September 2007 issue of the WikiProject History of Science newsletter has been published. You're receiving this because you are a participant in the History of Science WikiProject. You may read the newsletter or unsubscribe from this notification by following the link. Yours in discourse--ragesoss 01:07, 14 September 2007 (UTC)

Thulean Plateau[edit]

So are you saying it should be renamed as the "North Atlantic Igneous Province"? Black Tusk 12:33, 11 November 2007 (UTC)

WikiProject History of Science newsletter : Issue IV - May 2008[edit]

A new May 2008 issue of the WikiProject History of Science newsletter is hot off the virtual presses. Please feel free to make corrections or add news about any project-related content you've been working on. You're receiving this because you are a participant in the History of Science WikiProject. You may read the newsletter or unsubscribe from this notification by following the link. Yours in discourse--ragesoss (talk) 23:35, 2 May 2008 (UTC)

Oil shale geology[edit]

Hi, GeoWriter. I am going to nominate the Oil shale geology article for the GAN. However, I think this article probably needs some more editing and improvement before the nomination. Maybe you are interested to take a look on this article? Thank you in advance. Beagel (talk) 09:53, 21 June 2008 (UTC)

Hi. I nominated the Oil shale geology article for the GAN. You are welcome to comment and improve this article. Thank you. Beagel (talk) 17:52, 11 July 2008 (UTC)

You are invited...[edit]

to join the Volcanoes Wiki! Questions can be directed to my main user page. MeldshalP (talk) 14:24, 30 July 2008 (UTC)

WikiProject History of Science newsletter : Issue V - January 2009[edit]

It's here at long last! The January 2009 issue of the WikiProject History of Science newsletter is ready, with exciting news about Darwin Day 2009. Please feel free to make corrections or add news about any project-related content you've been working on. You're receiving this because you are a participant in the History of Science WikiProject. You may read the newsletter or unsubscribe from this notification by following the link. Yours in discourse --ragesoss (talk) 03:08, 11 January 2009 (UTC)

RE:This[edit]

User:Resident Mario/Volcanism of Hawaii Workgroup Just here to say Yay for joining. I've seen you around the articles before. Currently, Loihi (me, Viriditas), Kīlauea (Ceranthor), and Hawaii hotspot (me) are in development. ResMar 16:51, 14 March 2009 (UTC)

Loihi, take two. ResMar 00:27, 30 May 2009 (UTC)

Thanks...[edit]

...for your edits to Hawaii hotspot. Sometimes a little trim is necessary, and I think the edits you have applied have improved the article. I was actually thinking of splitting "characteristics", but I'm not sure of the notability of such an article, as there is no precedence that I know of for such an article. But it is so long and wordy, I think that is what keeps people from commenting on these types of articles because they do not want to read the whole thing. The article failed FAC for this reason.

So basically, thanks for making the article shorter where it was necessary. I'm hoping to try again, if you would like to be listed as a co-nom, just let me know. You are currently 4th in contribs, if you make some more edits and catch up to us, it would be good to list you next time. --ErgoSumtalktrib 01:22, 15 July 2009 (UTC)

Concerning your recent edit to Hawaii hotspot, it was brought up at FAC that 0.02 km3 (0.0048 cu mi) was harder to visualize than 20 cubic hectometers (26,000,000 cu yd). Personally, I'm not sure which I prefer, and I don't think its a big deal, but I thought you should know this may come up again. --ErgoSumtalktrib 18:04, 18 July 2009 (UTC)

Grats[edit]

MSH82 st helens plume from harrys ridge 05-19-82.jpg The Volcanoes Barnstar

This one goes to a dedicated editor who's been quietly improving the quite part of wikipedia that is volcanoes since...<waits for Special:Contributions to load> 2007! Hard to find a volcano article without your name on it somewhere :) ResMarHohoho 00:52, 2 December 2009 (UTC)

WP Volcanoes[edit]

Hello. If you haven't noticed, I've started a structural reorganization of WikiProject Volcanoes. So far, I've beutified the head page and moved a lot of the stuff to subpages of the project, so as not to bulk the main page. As an active member of the project, this is just a notice about what's going on. Comments go on the talk page. Happy holidays, ResMar 14:08, 25 December 2009 (UTC)

Shale and oil shale[edit]

Hi, GeoWriter, There is a discussion if all oil shales are shales or not. Your comments are appreciated. Beagel (talk) 07:49, 6 June 2010 (UTC)

List of 21st century earthquakes[edit]

Hi GeoWriter, thanks for helping out with List of 21st century earthquakes, it's a constant struggle against all those who want to put the earthquake that they felt into that list, or just the latest that they heard of on the news or from the USGS, no matter how insignificant. The lede is a lot clearer now, something that I'd been meaning to do for a while. Cheers, Mikenorton (talk) 19:10, 24 June 2010 (UTC)

I am glad to help. I expect it is quite big news for some people to hear about or feel an earthquake in their area, but if everyone included it on this list, the list would lose its impact. Hopefully, the guidance might steer at least some editors in the right direction. GeoWriter (talk) 19:41, 24 June 2010 (UTC)
I've opened a discussion at Talk:2010 Central Canada earthquake in which I'm trying to get views on the proposed earthquake article notability guidelines. On the basis of those guidelines the Central Canada quake article should be deleted, which probably won't win me many friends there. Maybe there is some merit in including something on population affected, but I fear that it would let too many of the little earthquakes back in and be heavily biased towards english-speaking areas. Mikenorton (talk) 19:59, 24 June 2010 (UTC)
BTW I have your talk page watched, so no need for the talkback. Mikenorton (talk) 20:01, 24 June 2010 (UTC)

Opening the discussion on the Canada quake is a good idea. I advise against "population affected" as a criterion because it is not measurable. It would require correlation of "population distribution at the exact moment of tremor" and "earthquake intensity" to absurd levels of accuracy. I'm confident such correlation data do not exist. Likewise, I doubt reliable mappings of structural damage are available either, certainly not outside the developed world. I recomend that the current criteria (magnitude >=7 or fatalities) are retained as the benchmark. GeoWriter (talk) 20:20, 24 June 2010 (UTC)

Portal talk[edit]

Re:This. Actually that was a valid question back then, I got pinged with it and wrote the article soon after :) ResMar 01:28, 6 August 2010 (UTC)

Devils Tower trachyte[edit]

Google books throws up multiple references describing Devils Tower National Monument as trachyte including [1][2][3][4]. Although there are just as many, if not more, describing it as phonolite, including all the geology books I looked at. Perhaps you can throw some light on this: has the meaning of trachyte changed over the years, is there some doubt over the classification of Devils Tower, or is it that the common use of the word is more general than the geological definition.? SpinningSpark 06:54, 13 August 2010 (UTC)

It would seem that the source for all these "trachyte" descriptions trace back to Henry Newton, the geologist with Dodge's 1875 expedition. SpinningSpark 07:04, 13 August 2010 (UTC)
Thanks for the links to the references. Phonolite was not discovered/defined as a rock type until 1877. If trachyte is being used these days for Devil's Tower, I suspect that it is most likely due to perpetuating outdated sources. Things have moved on considerably in geology in the 135 years since Dodge's expedition. The meaning of trachyte has narrowed as the classification and discovery of new rock types has progressed. Current rock classification standards are summarised in the UNESCO authoritative book on the subject : Le Maitre, R. (editor) (2002) Igneous Rocks: A Classification and Glossary of Terms, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.
Some igneous rock types are used in a concise/strict as well as a loose/general sense. Basalt is a minefield in this respect, because of its more varied mineralogy and widespread occurrence. As I mentioned in my previous comment, on the Devil's Tower talk page, there is a transition, but Devil's Tower would not be regarded as one of those transitional rock types. Devil's Tower falls into the phonolite category. Incidentally, I recently revised the Bass Rock article the other way, because it is transitional, phonolitic trachyte rather than phonolite. --GeoWriter (talk) 18:39, 14 August 2010 (UTC)
Sorry for reverting you, I thought you may have been editing based just on what was written in the article but it is now clear that you actually know what Devil's tower is made of. Perpetuating outdated sources may well be right, they all seem to have very similar, even plagiarised, wording and one of them cites verbatim a report from Dodge that sounds awfully familiar if you have read the rest. SpinningSpark 18:56, 14 August 2010 (UTC)

WikiProjects Moon and Mars activity[edit]

Hello there! As part of an effort to determine how many active editors are present in the space-related WikiProjects, some changes have been made to the lists of members of WikiProject Moon (here) and Mars (here). If you still consider yourself to be an active editor either of these projects, it would be appreciated if you would please edit the list so that your name is not struck out - thus a clearer idea of the number of active editors can be determined. Many thanks in advance!

Delivered by MessageDeliveryBot on behalf of WikiProject Solar System at 17:52, 3 December 2010 (UTC).

Teide[edit]

Hi, Yes I am active again. I will provide you withe the IAVCEI / UN list asap. Can you email me direct as I dive in and out of WP when I have time. My own email is Gerard-4-rox@hotmail.com. Thanks. — Preceding unsigned comment added by The Geologist (talkcontribs) 12:45, 11 April 2012 (UTC)

Disambiguation link notification for October 22[edit]

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Love history & culture? Get involved in WikiProject World Digital Library![edit]

World Digital Library Wikipedia Partnership - We need you!
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Hi GeoWriter! I'm the Wikipedian In Residence at the World Digital Library, a project of the Library of Congress and UNESCO. I'm recruiting Wikipedians who are passionate about history & culture to participate in improving Wikipedia using the WDL's vast free online resources. Participants can earn our awesome WDL barnstar and help to disseminate free knowledge from over 100 libraries in 7 different languages. Multilingual editors are welcome! (But being multilingual is not a requirement.) Please sign up to participate here. Thanks for editing Wikipedia and I look forward to working with you! SarahStierch (talk) 21:19, 29 May 2013 (UTC)

Disambiguation link notification for February 2[edit]

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Category:Evaporites[edit]

Hi GeoWriter
The journal title is "Carbonates and Evaporites"
Dolomites and calcites aren't evaporites, they aren't water soluble.
Plancton shells snow on the ocean floor.
See rruff.info/ima, choose the tag "Water Soluble" (321 minerals). [5]
I think that you were wrong here. Regards --Chris.urs-o (talk) 12:26, 15 March 2014 (UTC)
In a lacustrine environment, calcite is the commonest evaporite mineral - also aragonite and dolomite. See [6] & [7]. They may not be mainly evaporitic in their occurrence, but I was taught that they formed part of the Evaporite group. Mikenorton (talk) 14:14, 16 March 2014 (UTC)
Ok, I'll revert it. --Chris.urs-o (talk) 16:37, 16 March 2014 (UTC)
Thanks for your comments. I'm glad the issue seems to have been resolved.
All the books I've read about evaporites include calcite and dolomite, although I have noticed that they pay much less attention to the carbonates compared to the halides and sulphates. I think one's view of the "evaporite group" of minerals depends on whether one's focus is initial evaporation or later preservation. The classic descriptions of evaporation focus on the halides and sulphates. Study of the carbonates becomes more important when focus moves to diagenesis and preservation because e.g. calcite is often a pseudomorphic secondary replacement mineral in evaporite rock sequences. GeoWriter (talk) 23:55, 17 March 2014 (UTC)

York Museums Trust images and content[edit]

Hi Geowriter, thanks for your help tidying the Tempest Anderson and Trace fossil images I've uploaded to Commons from York Museums Trust's collections. I hope you're finding them interesting! If you feel like making any edits to the related articles and would like some support please let me know, or perhaps you know of other geologically-minded editors I should get in touch with? Cheers! PatHadley (talk) 10:35, 25 March 2014 (UTC)

Thanks for uploading the photos and also the cropped enhanced versions. I do find them very interesting. I know from my interest in volcanoes that Tempest Anderson was a major figure in the history of the science so I'm glad that some of his material can now reach a wider public.
More generally, I have seen from the Yorkshire Museum Geology Collection webpage, that the Trust has a large collection of rocks, minerals and fossils. Would it be possible to upload photos of some of the Trust's minerals, fossils and especially rocks to Wikimedia Commons, please? Wikipedia is particularly weak in its representation of rock specimens. I anticipate that such material could be very useful for improving Wikipedia's geological articles. GeoWriter (talk) 22:17, 29 March 2014 (UTC)
Hi! Glad you like Anderson's images. Sorry for the delayed reply - this must have got lost in my watchlist.... I can certainly talk to the geology curators about this! It would be great to be able to set up a partnership. Are there particular areas you'd like to see covered? I can have a look through the catalogue tomorrow and see what's available. Cheers, PatHadley (talk) 17:32, 3 April 2014 (UTC)
Hi, I replied over at my talk page. Looking forward to working together! PatHadley (talk) 08:47, 10 April 2014 (UTC)

Shield volcano[edit]

Hey there, if you have the time I could really use some hand gestures from an expert on what's still lacking in Shield volcano (also, any good sources you know)? ResMar 15:50, 27 June 2014 (UTC)

Salt surface structures[edit]

Saw you'd edited Salt tectonics and hoped you would take a look at this new article. It relies on a single source and really can't tell if it is published research (copyright?), an offshoot of tectonics, or even part of someone's original research. I changed "techtonics" to "tectonics" and tagged for resources but that was as far as I could go. Thanks. EBY (talk) 06:26, 14 November 2014 (UTC)

I've suggested at the article talk page that the name be changed to allochthonous salt structures, a term used quite widely in the literature, whereas the current one is hardly used at all. The content is OK, although the terminology introduced by Hudec and Jackson hasn't really taken off yet, although some other workers are using it. I would like to see it expanded to cover other allochthonous salt structures, like canopies, for which there are hundreds of sources available. The article was created as part of a university course (if that's not already clear). Mikenorton (talk) 19:46, 15 November 2014 (UTC)

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July 2015[edit]

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  • transitional to [[gabbro]]. The presence of significant quartz makes the rock type quartz-diorite (>5% quartz) or [[tonalite]] (>20% quartz), and if [[orthoclase]] ([[potassium]] feldspar) is present at greater than ten percent,
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In recognition of your efforts[edit]

GeologicalStoneBarnstar.png The Geology Barnstar
Thanks for all your work on improving the readability and internal links of geological articles Mikenorton (talk) 11:45, 8 August 2015 (UTC)

Thanks very much. GeoWriter (talk) 12:01, 11 August 2015 (UTC)

Invitation to comment[edit]

I started a discussion at Talk:Monadnock#Requested_move_12_September_2015 and would like to hear you opinion. -Lappspira (talk) 17:30, 15 September 2015 (UTC)

Cumbre Vieja[edit]

Hi, You commented upon items relating to tsunamis in the Cumbre Vieja page. I decided to rewrite the page - extensively as it contained many errors of fact, a lot of histrionics and an awful lot of pseudo-science presented as science. I actually work in the Canaries as a volcanologist and became increasingly annoyed at the misrepresentation that was being presented. Having discussed the issue with my colleagues it was agreed that whilst strictly not connected to the Cumbre Vieja, the media in particular present Lituya Bay, Vaijont Dam etc., as "proving" the so called mega-tsunami claims. Which is why after much deliberation I decided to leave them in. The trouble is that people watch TV and the documentaries which present pseudo-science as fact and they believe that it must be true as the producers broadcast the information - not helped by a certain insurance financed professor who insists that the claim that the Cumbre Vieja is in the initial stages of failure without any evidence to support his claims - but he shouts long and hard and has BIG bucks behind him. So on that basis I feel that the article is best served by presenting the information as it stands. Let me know how you feel. Thanks,The Geologist (talk) 16:00, 28 September 2015 (UTC)

Cumbre Vieja[edit]

Tsunami items - I am sorry but I disagree. However if you who are not involved with the Cumbre Vieja want to do what you suggest then do it but don't be surprised if they do reappear - not by me. I did as I said think long and hard about the information and discussed it with my colleagues who are based here in the Canary Islands before deciding that the informatiom should be left in. Someone is intent on messing with the page - people who have not got the facts. The Lituya Bay incident has sat on the CV pages for several years long before I decided to rewrite it, and I feel that there has been ample opportunity to remove them. I and my colleagues are sick tired and weary of people who don't like what is written about the CV and seem to deliberately want to perpetuate the myth presented by a certain Bill McGuire, Simon Day and Stephen Ward who have been financed by the insurance industry. However not wanting to contravene Wiki's ethos etc; as far as I am concerned then they can be transferred to the tsunami page, but I still feel that they should be mentioned especially the Lituya Bay incident as that is what lead McGuire, Day etc to seek funding from the insurance companies. Incidentally which items are you referring to as not being "Peer Reviewed?" as every reference I have included is published in peer reviewed journals. I do not consider the media to be peer reviewed - unlike some people. The Geologist — Preceding unsigned comment added by 92.2.108.129 (talk) 12:40, 29 September 2015 (UTC)

Hi, Sorry if I came across as annoyed in my last post to you. Thanks for your guidance and opinions and assistance which I really do appreciate. I tried to be as detached from the information I have presented as is possible and strongly resisted any temptation to involve personal opinions about certain scientific personnel - which was done in previous editions of the page. I have just realised that I was not logged in when I sent the post above - apologies as I didn't do it deliberately.

On reflection I concur about the Lituya Bay, Voiant Dam etc., and as I state strictly they were not tsunami's in my interpretation of what a tsunami actually is. In reality they were nothing more than a big splash - similar to someone dropping a boulder in a lake. The trouble is as you are aware that the media encouraged by some scientists jump on bandwagons and then present the information as scientific proof of something. How many times are we advised that some lump of rock is on an orbit which will bring it within "X" km of Earth but then the next sentence states that the event won't happen for the next umpteen tens, hundreds etc years. People panic and perhaps a better explanation of Lituya Bay, Vaiont Dam etc is needed to help counter the argument that the CV is in imminent danger of failing.

Perhaps something like this:

"Examples of so called mega-tsunami that have been used by the media are little more than large surges of water that resulted in a large volume of rock and debris entering confining waters. Whilst these may have surged to high levels (as at Lituya Bay in 1958) and displaced large volumes of water they are not tsunamis, more importantly not mega-tsunamis." Thanks for your time.The Geologist (talk) 12:21, 30 September 2015 (UTC)

Cumbre Vieja - "mega-tsunami's"[edit]

Hi Having given this much thought I think that whilst the reference to Lituya Bay etc may not stricto senso be relevant, they do nevertheless have some purpose in the item. I will give consideration to rewording and emphasising that they only serve as models of what might happen when a large volume of material suddenly enter a body of water, but the emphasis must be that no mega - tsunami has been recorded within recorded history. As the examples indicate the sudden pulse of energy creates a large surge which rapidly dissipates. Before I put anything on the page I would be happy to let you see it and agree the wording - if you are happy to do do. Your thoughts please.The Geologist (talk) 14:53, 1 October 2015 (UTC)

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ArbCom elections are now open![edit]

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A barnstar for you![edit]

Original Barnstar Hires.png The Original Barnstar
Quality contributions! Wikiwanito (talk) 11:49, 15 December 2015 (UTC)
Thanks. GeoWriter (talk) 20:00, 15 December 2015 (UTC)

Volcanic bomb[edit]

I appreciate your edit summary comment and descriptive edits regarding this image. The only reason I called it a volcanic bomb is because that was what the on site geologist/volcanologist called it. Would it be more appropriate for the tephra article? Thank in advance.--Godot13 (talk) 20:08, 4 February 2016 (UTC)

I've renamed the image accordingly.--Godot13 (talk) 20:23, 4 February 2016 (UTC)
I'm glad that you renamed the file, because it prevents people using it incorrectly in future (at least I hope so). Just to clarify, it can't be a volcanic bomb because it shows layers of thousands of roughly thumb-sized fragments which were originally blobs of molten lava that rained down onto the ground surface. A volcanic bomb is a single blob of molten lava and does not have internal layering like this slab. There is a chance that the slab in the photo could be a volcanic block that was ripped off the volcanic vent wall and ejected as a solid block when lava and/or gas was erupting from a vent, or it could be a slab of tephra that was eroded from a volcanic cone after eruption. Without examining the surrounding area, it's not possible for me to be sure if its a volcanic block or a volcanic slab.
I'm shocked that another geologist called it a volcanic bomb!
The photo is a good example of tephra and also nice that it's from a neglected volcanic region, so it would be appropriate for the tephra article. GeoWriter (talk) 21:29, 5 February 2016 (UTC)

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Geology of Germany
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Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary[edit]

Hello, GeoWriter -- Do you have Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary on your watchlist? An editor just added a comment to Talk:Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary#Suggestions for improving this and the other article, a section in which the previous comment was in 2008. If you didn't have the article on your watchlist, I thought you might be interested. I don't know if there has been discussion on this in the intervening years.  – Corinne (talk) 02:39, 2 March 2016 (UTC)

Thanks Corinne for telling me about this. I'll take a look at the article. GeoWriter (talk) 19:51, 9 March 2016 (UTC)

Mountain, montane, alpine[edit]

Hello, GeoWriter -- You might be interested in a discussion at Talk:Mountain ecology#Renaming article. If I understand it correctly, an editor already changed the name of the article before any discussion, and another editor suggested leaving the new name until discussion was held and consensus had been reached. Also see the sub-section just below this; they're related. You have some expertise in this area, so you may be able to help.  – Corinne (talk) 23:32, 8 April 2016 (UTC)

Orogeny[edit]

I took my rewrite from [8] (yes, in spite of WP:NOTADICTIONARY). Do you really think my revision created an inaccuracy?? Also, I was trying to implement a Manual of Style policy with regard to ledes that discourages the use of things like "means" or "refers to" or "is a word for". KDS4444 (talk) 12:41, 2 June 2016 (UTC)

I agree that the lede section should be rewritten and I welcome your intention of trying to implement the Manual of Style point about definitions and, as I indicated when I reverted your edit, I appreciate that your edit was made in good faith with the intention of improving the article. Orogeny is a set of processes that may include mountain formation. Unfortunately, I think your edit put too much emphasis on mountains, and on balance, I felt that the previous version was a bit more accurate, although there is much scope for improvement. I hope it will be possible for us to eventually create a better lede section if a discussion is started on this in the article's talk page. GeoWriter (talk) 13:17, 2 June 2016 (UTC)

(shorter) content for Olympus Mons, Impact Origin Hypothesis section[edit]

Taking your comments to heart regarding undue length of the Impact Origin Hypothesis section I added earlier to theOlympus Mons page, but also thinking that this section needs content to make any sense, I have proposed a much shorter version (reduced from 670 to 278 words, and from 4 references to 3). The text frames this clearly as a hypothesis, which seems appropriate for Wikipedia -- countless other pages on planetary and other topics present hypotheses as well. This particular hypothesis is new (first published November 2015), but peer-reviewed and carefully built from evidence. It addresses major anomalies facing the volcanic hypothesis (e.g., circularity, concentric structure, no isostatic depression, and debris flows that traveled up to 750 km down a pre-Olympus slope of 0.2 degrees). These points are made compactly; interested readers can pursue on their own. IChiloe (talk) 16:58, 28 July 2016 (UTC)

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Antillanca[edit]

Noting here that Antillanca Group actually exists but Antillanca redirects to the ski resort. I also wonder what the standard for one volcano vs. group of volcanoes is, my impression has always been that it's a "degree" sort of thing that everybody and every source will disagree on. Jo-Jo Eumerus (talk, contributions) 19:21, 8 August 2016 (UTC)

Thanks for finding Antillanca Group. I don't know why my search for that failed earlier.
There are two types of volcanic groups as far as naming is concerned. One type of group includes a volcano after which the group is named. For example the Olkhovy Volcanic Group comprises a shield volcano named Olkhovy and one other lower cone (called Plosky), so it would often be valid to refer to Olkhovy (meaning the individual volcano) or Olkhovy (meaning the wider group). The other type of group, including the Antillanca Group, is not named after any of its constituent volcanoes and in this case it's better to avoid giving the impression that Antillanca is an individual volcano. Of course, that still leaves the option of taking individual volcanoes of the Antillanca Group as examples/an example, but using their individual names. GeoWriter (talk) 19:52, 8 August 2016 (UTC)
As far as the list of volcanoes in the Laguna del Maule article is concerned (from which I removed Antillanca), I think it was an incomplete list anyway, which I think is still good enough without Antillanca. GeoWriter (talk) 20:02, 8 August 2016 (UTC)
Laguna del Maule (volcano), actually. Laguna del Maule is the article on the lake. These title collisions are a nuisance. The selection was mostly arbitrary anyway; I took it from the source but I don't think they had a specific inclusion criterium. Jo-Jo Eumerus (talk, contributions) 20:37, 8 August 2016 (UTC)

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Mineralogy[edit]

Dear,GeoWriter,

I have noticed, that you took part in contributing to the article Mineralogy - a fascinating field of science, which I’m considering, as a very important and endlessly interesting one, which deserves to the nth degree, as I think, to have its own Wikipedia Mineralogy Barnstar, and if you agree with this statement and will find the design of the Mineralogy Barnstar as a good one, please, give your support in the section Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Wikipedia Awards. This section not visited very often by Wikipedians, and the authors of new Barnstars usually invite for discussion those Editors, who are interested in the related fields of science, art, etc. This Sunday morning (30/10) I’ll upload Mineralogy Barnstar to the following section: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia_talk:WikiProject_Wikipedia_Awards Complete description of this Barnstar will be possible to find tomorrow (30/10) morning on https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Mineralogy

Regards, Chris Oxford.Chris Oxford (talk) 19:55, 29 October 2016 (UTC)


Good evening, GeoWriter. Great thanks for your support! It was very good to see, that this Barnstar has found your appreciation. I think, that one day the article Mineralogy will be a good articles nominee anew, this time — successfully and, I hope, that during this, gradually approaching nice day, the contributors will be awarded by the, belonging precisely to this field of science, genuine Mineralogy Barnstar.

Thank you very much again.

Regards, Chris.Chris Oxford (talk) 22:51, 30 October 2016 (UTC)

Scandinavian Mountains[edit]

Thanks for your edits in Scandinavian_Mountains#Geology. The uplift question seems a bit tricky and I have tried avoid name-bombing the article (yes, I don't think Wikipedia is expected to look like a review paper). Your inline remarks were quite useful and I hope I have addressed all of your concerns. If not I would be glad you added new remarks. I have tried to limit the scope of the geology section to avoid turning it into a geology of Norway article. Perhaps it also time for a specific article on the Scandinavian Caledonides? What do you think? Lappspira (talk) 13:06, 4 November 2016 (UTC)

Hematite[edit]

I wonder what that long Persian phrase actually meant. Pretty sure it wasn't hematite! RockMagnetist(talk) 22:22, 19 November 2016 (UTC)

I checked the words in Google Translate and I think the Arabic and Persian text may have been correct translations for hematite. The Persian version is long because it lists several synonyms. That's why I opted for the "not a dictionary" reason for my deletion. GeoWriter (talk) 12:14, 20 November 2016 (UTC)

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Permian Basin (North America)[edit]

Hello, GeoWriter -- I was just looking at the latest edit to Permian Basin (North America), and I saw a red link in the section Permian Basin (North America)#The Delaware Basin: the Ouachita–Marathon thrust belt. I changed the hyphen between "Ouachita" and "Marathon" to an en-dash, but it didn't turn the link blue. I did a little searching to see if there were an article with a slightly different title, but the only thing I could find was Ouachita Mountains. In that article I found a link to Ouachita orogeny. I wonder if one of those two articles is close enough to "Ouachita–Marathon thrust belt" so that it could be a blue link. If not, then there is an article to be written when someone has time. ;)  – Corinne (talk) 00:40, 26 November 2016 (UTC)

Thanks for raising this point. As the paragraph is describing the structural feature, the Delaware Basin, I think the emphasis is more on the surface topography than the geological history, so I favour linking to the Ouachita Mountains (a landform feature, of course) rather than the Ouachita orogeny (a set of events and processes that produced the landforms). I added a piped wiki link in the Permian Basin (North America) article. I hope my edit was helpful.
By the way, the Ouachita Mountains article links to the Ouachita orogeny article anyway, so that base is also covered indirectly. GeoWriter (talk) 13:21, 26 November 2016 (UTC)
Great! Thanks!  – Corinne (talk) 14:55, 26 November 2016 (UTC)

Boso Triple Junction[edit]

Hello, GeoWriter - I just stumbled across the article Boso Triple Junction. I made a few copy-edits as I was reading, but there was one word that I thought was a little unclear. I added a "clarification needed" tag and a hidden note to editors (visible in edit mode). I also noticed that there has been a tag at the top of the article saying "This article does not cite any sources" since 2009. If you have time, I wonder if you could clarify that one spot where I placed the "clarification needed" tag, and, if you feel like working on the article, maybe you could find some sources. I wonder if you think this article is worth nominating for improvement at WP:TAFINOM.  – Corinne (talk) 02:09, 10 February 2017 (UTC)

Hello Corinne. Thanks for your message. I made some changes to the article, added a source reference etc. I hope my edits have improved the article. I'll need to think about the clarification issue that your raised about the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami paragraph. GeoWriter (talk) 15:37, 10 February 2017 (UTC)
I'm sure your edits have improved the article! Thanks for spending time on it.  – Corinne (talk) 15:42, 10 February 2017 (UTC)
I noticed some tags at the top of Triple junction. Is this an article you might consider working on in the near future? If not, should I nominate it as an article to be improved at WP:TAFINOM? Do you think additional material and sources exist that could be added to it?  – Corinne (talk) 15:48, 10 February 2017 (UTC) Actually, it probably wouldn't be selected because it gets only 91 daily page views.  – Corinne (talk) 15:49, 10 February 2017 (UTC)

Calthemite[edit]

Hi GeoWriter,

I am quite puzzled by your removal of the sentence as below, from the Calthemite page.

"The chemistry related to dissolution of dolomite rock and deposition of calthemites (secondary deposits) in mines and tunnels within dolomite rock, is not covered on this page."

Dolomite is CaMg(CO3)2 and the chemistry which dissolves and then the secondary precipitation can be as calcium carbonate, calcite, Mg-calcite, aragonite, huntite and hydromagnesite. Obviously calcium carbonate and aragonite are the same chemical composition, with a different morphology. The point is that to detail the different chemical reactions to fully cover dolomite dissolution and precipitation possibilities as these other minerals (Calcium Carbonate, Mg-calcite, huntite, hydromagnesite) would take a lengthy wiki page on its own. Hence my sentence above as previously added to the wikipage on calthemite.

Regarding your comment of a limitation, I have changed the sentence to read as follows in the calthemite page.

"The chemistry related to dissolution of dolomite rock and deposition of calthemites (secondary deposits) in mines and tunnels within dolomite rock, is not detailed on this page." The word "covered" is changed to detailed. I am sure that if someone has the time to spend fully detailing the chemistry for the above then they can easily remove the sentence above. RegardsNewcaves (talk) 06:18, 12 February 2017 (UTC)

If particular content is not yet on Wikipedia or is too detailed to be covered in an article, editors do not usually explicitly state "X is not covered on this page". I think this is because such a statement discourages further editing. I think that too many editors are likely to interpret this as a limitation on the scope of the article and treat it as effectively meaning "do not add content about X to this article". If your restriction was not there, I think that editors would more likely to add content. These are the reasons why I removed your "is not covered on this page" text.
The Wikipedia best practice guideline for encouraging editors to add new content on specific topics is to create red links. Therefore, in your case, I suggest a red link of something along the lines of Dolomite dissolution and precipitation to encourage creation of a new article, or a red link to a potential new section in the Dolomite mineral article, would be a better solution to this issue, along with removal of any references in the Calthemite article as to what is not (yet) included, covered or detailed in the article. GeoWriter (talk) 12:40, 12 February 2017 (UTC)

Hi GeoWriter

Much appreciate your comments and words of wisdom. I think that is a good idea regarding a potential new page. It certainly would be the chemistry which occurs far more frequently in natural caves in Dolomite rock as a "Speleothem", hence I am reluctant to add this to the calthemite section which only covers secondary deposits in man-made mines and tunnels excavated into dolomite rock. Not convinced that this would fit directly into any existing Wikipedia page. Hence the idea of a red link to a possible new page sounds great. I will chew this over a little more and alter the sentence in the next day or so. Thanks again for your valued comments and wisdom. Kind regardsNewcaves (talk) 14:05, 12 February 2017 (UTC)

Seabed topography[edit]

This is a minor point, but would you mind clarifying the point of your refinement to the seabed topography links? They still link to the same place, but now bypass the redirect created specifically for that purpose. --Epipelagic (talk) 14:48, 15 February 2017 (UTC)

I was not aware of the redirect. I'll revert my edits. GeoWriter (talk) 14:56, 15 February 2017 (UTC)

Dolostone - Dolomite (rock)[edit]

Hi Geowriter,

Some time back you added a Globalisation Note

to the "Dolostone" page. I thought your note was very appropriate and was disappointed to see that another editor had removed this note. Until recently I had never heard of the word "dolostone" despite being a serious caver/speleologist for over 50 years (and still active in speleology). I have caved in karst areas of dolomite rock on numerous occasions and studied much literature regarding dolomite and limestone karst as well as speleothems within. Anyway in that time I had never come across the term "dolostone" because the international speleological community call the rock "dolomite" or "dolomite rock". This lead to lengthy discussion with Vsmith, which you can view on his talk page, and I am hoping that he will change the title of the page to "Dolomite (rock)" which is more widely accepted by the international "geological" and "speleological" communities. I do personally think that the dolomite mineral page and the dolomite rock page should be combined, but there appears to be some staunch supporters intent on keeping the pages separate. Anyway if the "dolostone" page title was changed to "Dolomite (rock)" then I would be prepared to add more to the page. I note that you have been a regular contributor to the dolostone page and wanted to say that I agree with you, that the page should have a more global structure, terms, recognised name. This may then lead the way to chemistry relating to speleothem deposition in Dolomite caves (speleothems) and Dolomite mines (calthemites) being added. Kind regards Newcaves (talk) 07:05, 19 February 2017 (UTC)

I added the globalize template back in October 2016 because the text (i.e. the article's perspective) was too US-centric. The text was dominated by an American debate focusing on the opinions of the US Geological Survey and the American Geological Institute on whether they preferred the term dolomote, dolomite rock or dolostone. Unfortunately, the hard-coded message displayed by the globalize template refers to examples and perspective. I presume V. Smith ignored my point about the text's perspective and assumed instead that it was an issue connected to 3 of the 4 photos being of American examples. I have no problem with V.Smith's good faith edit because I think the dolostone article will probably become less US-biased anyway, as the text is expanded and improved. GeoWriter (talk) 15:39, 19 February 2017 (UTC)
I could support the renaming of the dolostone article to become dolomite (rock). I think it is really unfortunate that dolomite rock and dolomite mineral seem to have been made "confusable" probably since the day that dolomite rock was first discovered. If only dolostone had caught on as a popular term...
I do not support merging the dolostone/dolomite rock and the dolomite (mineral) articles. GeoWriter (talk) 15:53, 19 February 2017 (UTC)

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Karst[edit]

Hello, GeoWriter – I was just looking at the latest edits to Karst, and I saw that an editor had made quite a few changes to the article. While I am not an expert, it seemed to me that the edits were all made in good faith and most seemed all right, but I wondered about a few things:

1) The editor removed mention of several karst formations such as those in the U.S. and the Philippines, as unsourced. I thought perhaps the information was pertinent enough that perhaps sources could be found.

2) The editor added some material. While I cannot judge the accuracy of the content, I felt the wording could be improved, so I did some re-wording in this edit. If you feel further changes need to be made, please feel free to make them.

3) The editor re-arranged some material and made new section headings. I am not an expert in writing articles, but I have edited so many articles that I felt something was not right. For example, in most articles – for example, as in Cliff – Etymology is one of the first sections after the lead, and usually, though not always (see Basalt), is a section unto itself. It seems to me that "Etymology" does not belong within a section headed "History of karst studies". Also, that new section now has only two sub-sections: "Etymology" and "Early karst studies". There is no mention of later karst studies, so I wonder if that new section heading, "History of karst studies", is even necessary.

You are more of the expert in both the subject matter and writing articles, so I'll let you sort this out.  – Corinne (talk) 01:54, 18 June 2017 (UTC)

Thanks Corinne for your comments about the karst article. I checked the recent edits by User:Lappspira (who does good work on Wikipedia geology articles), and I made some changes to the section hierarchy and also the section titles. I hope my edits have improved the article. I think the removal of karst formations in e.g. the US seems reasonable to me because they are still included in the main article: List of notable karst areas anyway. GeoWriter (talk) 12:10, 22 June 2017 (UTC)

Pyromorphite[edit]

You left a comment on Wikipedia's "Pyromorphite" page, requesting non-primary sources for the citations of Klaproth and Hausmann that I posted.

Would a non-primary source in German be acceptable?

My source is: http://tw.strahlen.org/typloc/pyromorphit.html

This Web page was created by and is maintained by Dr. Thomas Witzke, as stated on his home page: http://tw.strahlen.org/index.html

Witzke is a German mineralogist and geochemist, as stated in the German Wikipedia article about him: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Witzke

Would it be okay to cite Dr. Witzke's Web page on pyromorphite as a non-primary source ?

VexorAbVikipædia (talk) 11:52, 31 August 2017 (UTC)


Mount Tambora[edit]

I have nominated Mount Tambora for a featured article review here. Please join the discussion on whether this article meets featured article criteria. Articles are typically reviewed for two weeks. If substantial concerns are not addressed during the review period, the article will be moved to the Featured Article Removal Candidates list for a further period, where editors may declare "Keep" or "Delist" the article's featured status. The instructions for the review process are here. Jo-Jo Eumerus (talk, contributions) 10:14, 15 October 2017 (UTC)

Wikipedia-integrated academic journal[edit]

Hi,

I'm messaging to ask whether you might be interested in being an editor for the WikiJournal of Science (www.WikiJSci.org)? It's a journal modelled on the successful Wikipedia-integrated medical journal (www.WikiJMed.org). The editorial board is covers a range of fields and expertise.

It couples the rigour of academic peer review with the extreme reach of the encyclopedia. It is therefore an excellent way to achieve public engagement, outreach and impact public understanding of science (articles often get >100,000 views per year).

Peer-reviewed articles are dual-published both as standard academic PDFs, as well as directly into Wikipedia. This improves the scientific accuracy of the encyclopedia, and rewards academics with citable, indexed publications. It also provides much greater reach than is normally achieved through traditional scholarly publishing.

Based on my experiences, time commitment is pretty flexible. An editor would generally devote 2-10 hours per month to inviting suitable submissions and organise their external peer review:

  • Identify fully missing Wikipedia topics and invite academics to write broad review articles on them (e.g. this)
  • Identify important, but poorly covered topics and invite experts to update or overhaul them (e.g. this)
  • Invite authors of good Wikipedia pages to put their articles through external peer review (like this)
  • Possibly implement some figure or gallery review articles (e.g this and this)

Hopefully it will help to get experts, academics and professionals to contribute content to the encyclopedia via a more familiar and cv-rewarding academic journal format.

Anyway, let me know if it's the sort of thing that might interest you. PS. A relevant article in Science.

T.Shafee(Evo&Evo)talk 04:17, 25 November 2017 (UTC), edited 11:04, 27 November 2017 (UTC)

Note: I realised I missed out some links in the message above, so I've taken the liberty of editing the previous message. T.Shafee(Evo&Evo)talk 11:04, 27 November 2017 (UTC)
T.Shafee(Evo&Evo), thanks for the invitation, but I am not interested in participating. I wish you good luck with the journal. GeoWriter (talk) 00:53, 4 December 2017 (UTC)
No worries. Good luck with your various wiki endeavours! T.Shafee(Evo&Evo)talk 01:55, 4 December 2017 (UTC)

ArbCom 2017 election voter message[edit]

Scale of justice 2.svg Hello, GeoWriter. Voting in the 2017 Arbitration Committee elections is now open until 23.59 on Sunday, 10 December. All users who registered an account before Saturday, 28 October 2017, made at least 150 mainspace edits before Wednesday, 1 November 2017 and are not currently blocked are eligible to vote. Users with alternate accounts may only vote once.

The Arbitration Committee is the panel of editors responsible for conducting the Wikipedia arbitration process. It has the authority to impose binding solutions to disputes between editors, primarily for serious conduct disputes the community has been unable to resolve. This includes the authority to impose site bans, topic bans, editing restrictions, and other measures needed to maintain our editing environment. The arbitration policy describes the Committee's roles and responsibilities in greater detail.

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Non-existing user[edit]

Regarding the discussion at Talk:Moldavite, please don't add confusion by referring to an ip by a non-existing username. That only adds confusion. If the ip creates an account and starts using it, that will be fine - but it is up to that ip to do so and to make the connection on the talk page. If i have missed something and there is such a registered user - please enlighten me :) Vsmith (talk) 14:27, 9 December 2017 (UTC)

Ah - there is such a user ... but the discussion on talk is from an ip - my apologies. However, we still don't need to refer to the ip as the user ... that just adds confusion ... and yeah my confusion - sorry 'bout that. Vsmith (talk) 14:35, 9 December 2017 (UTC)

Geology of Finland[edit]

I have begun to write the article geology of Finland, you are welcome to take a look. –Lappspira (talk) 21:13, 1 January 2018 (UTC)

Cryptodepression[edit]

Dear GeoWriter

I saw your contributions for the article "Cryptodepression". Now: My English is not so good... and I wanted to ask you for a favour

Could you make a correction? a cryptodepression is not simply a LAKE... A cryptodepression is only the PART of the lake which lies UNDER 0 meter altitude....

Greetings, --Marie de France (talk) 12:15, 19 February 2018 (UTC)

Thanks for your message. I have changed the article. Is it correct now? GeoWriter (talk) 14:20, 19 February 2018 (UTC)

Geology of Malta[edit]

Thank you so much for your help on Geology of Malta - really makes a difference to have expert input. It's a great joy translating pieces like this as I learn so much along the way! :) Beckettnoti (talk) 16:12, 22 February 2018 (UTC)

Thanks for the translation. It's good to include information translated into English from other language Wikipedias. GeoWriter (talk) 16:48, 22 February 2018 (UTC)

Opinion request on geology categories[edit]

GeoWriter, I see you have edited many geology articles so I would like to have your opinion on this renaming proposal: Wikipedia:Categories_for_discussion/Log/2018_April_17#Magmatism_not_igneous_petrolog. Thank you! Mamayuco (talk) 21:23, 17 April 2018 (UTC)

Gracias![edit]

Hey, thanks for adding the photos to Nevado del Ruiz. Only now I see that the journal of the UNAL is CC licensed, so that means I have hundreds of images to upload to go with the many articles I've written already and many more in the pipeline.

Oh even better, also the journal of the UIS is CC 4.0. Amazing, cool. That will boost the articles greatly. Good weekend, Tisquesusa (talk) 23:22, 2 June 2018 (UTC)

Tisquesusa, I'm glad that the photos that I found and added to the Nevado del Ruiz article may improve that article, and that they alerted you to the journals of UNAL (and UIS) being CC-BY. I want to warn you to be very careful about using images from these journals. It is very important to remember that even though the journal and articles are CC-BY, many of the images may not be CC-BY. If an image in a CC-BY article has been copied from another previously published article (which is not also CC-BY), or if the creator of an image is not one of the authors of the article, then that image is not CC-BY. The copyright of the image overrides the copyright of the article and journal. I'm sure that you will be able to find some images that are CC-BY, and which are therefore allowed on Wikipedia, but perhaps not as many as you want. I'm looking forward to seeing what you find. GeoWriter (talk) 12:13, 3 June 2018 (UTC)
Ah, thanks for the warning. That makes sense. So for instance the author of an article uses a geological map, puts some lines on it and attributes it as "based on map X published by [non CC] author Y", then that image cannot be used. Got it. It all boils down to the author then, if they properly attribute the images. But I have seen many diagrams and some maps already created by the authors themselves, so that is good. My policy in using refs has always been focused on open access journals, but especially on CC journals, reasoning that if we promote using the open and free access model and CC licensing, we should help promote those that use the same model. I have limited access to subscription journals anyway. Cheers. Tisquesusa (talk) 13:58, 3 June 2018 (UTC)