User talk:Gerda Arendt

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St.-Salvator-Kathedrale, Orgel-Detail.JPG

Did you know ...

... that in "Mein Gott, wie schön ist deine Welt",
a 1936 hymn by Georg Thurmair,
every stanza declares three times,
"How beautiful is Your world"?

see also · listen also

Tanz-Toccata "I love the colourful world"

Archive of 2009 · 2010 · 2011 · 2012 · 2013 · 2014 · 2015 · 2016 · 2017 · 2018 · 2019 · 2020 · blushing

December songs
Rombergpark, Dortmund.jpg
Die güldne Sonne voll Freud und Wonne
Die Fliege
in memoriam
Jutta Lampe als Mrs. Baines.jpg
Jutta Lampe
4 December
Gabriel Dessauer 2011.jpg
Unser lieben Frauen Traum
Advent
Böhm Advent cantata, Dreikönigskirche, Frankfurt.jpg
Dreikönigskirche, Frankfurt

2020 · illumination, enlightenment and vision[edit]

Illuminated human alphabet.jpg

Did you know ...

... that Ave Maria, an obscure piece for two men's choirs
by Franz Biebl published in 1964,
became a choral standard after Chanticleer
made it part of their holiday programs?

(1 January 2020 · listen to Chanticleer, 2015)

... that John Rutter wrote the text and music for
Angels' Carol, a choral piece for Christmas,
using the Latin "Gloria in excelsis Deo" as a refrain?

(24 December 2019 · listen to us, 2019)

A barnstar for you! - thanks in 2019, visions in 2020[edit]

Special Barnstar Hires.png The Special Barnstar
Happy New Year, Gerda Arendt! You are receiving this barnstar because, according to this Wikipedia database query, you were the #3 most thanked Wikipedian of 2019, with 1418 entries in Special:Log/thanks during 2019. Congratulations, and, well, thank you for your contributions! Face-smile.svg Cheers to 2020. Mz7 (talk) 01:12, 1 January 2020 (UTC)
Thank you, Mz7, that's nice, just a statistical number, but nice, especially concluding 2019, a year I designated to be the year of thanks. I thank those who thanked me, - it always feels good to receive this little token of one's work being noticed and even liked. I'll transfer the barnstar to project WP:QAI for which I work. We had three topics in 2019 which are ongoing, and you can help (you all, I mean, member or not) to work on them:
What really counts for me are written thanks is prose such as those from Voceditenore and Coffee.
Let's make 2020 a year of vision, together! Article for today Psalm 103. Happy editing in 2020! --Gerda Arendt (talk) 08:18, 1 January 2020 (UTC)
Awesome! Another interesting statistical number: according to a different database query, you were also last year's most thankful Wikipedian, with 4246 uses of the thank tool in 2019. If you meant for 2019 to be your year of thanks, you certainly achieved it. Face-smile.svg Mz7 (talk) 01:43, 2 January 2020 (UTC)
You read my mind that I was more interested in giving than receiving ;) - Of course it's also just a number, - I regard the clicks as a lazy expression of thanks, and count more what I do in thanking users in prose.

I hope that visions for 2020 will be as successful as the thanks in 2019:

... that missed friends return (... banned, blocked for no good reason, just given up ...)

... that edit-warring is replaced by discussion - I am on voluntary 1RR

... that people realise when they dominate a discussion too much - I try to stick to 2 comments

... that infoboxes added in good faith (now or in the past) are not regarded as vandalism

... that we'll live up to the legacy of Brian Boulton, in article creation (Percy Grainger and Lost operas by Claudio Monteverdi coming to mind), reviewing the work of others, willingness to seek compromise, and respectful attitude

... or in summary: that good faith and IAR are applied more generally, - just look at Ray's Rules and "go on with life, have a laugh, don't get too upset over this".

I may add to this list later - this is just a spontaneous wishlist. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 08:06, 2 January 2020 (UTC)
ps: The (missed) Rambling Man is with us again! --Gerda Arendt (talk) 17:16, 10 January 2020 (UTC) and the (missed) Begoon at least edited his user page. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 19:35, 12 January 2020 (UTC)
Kirsten Flagstad - Liebestod - 1936 Covent Garden
Please let me offer my best wishes to you for the year 2020. May all your whishes and aspirations be fulfilled and many thanks for being so patient with heavy cases such as me. In other terms, thanks for being here, so helpful and ready to spare you time to help other users. On my part, I'll try to advance from inept to less inept. Respectfully yours, LouisAlain (talk) 08:56, 2 January 2020 (UTC)
love-ly, thank you! - just began "your radiance consumes all darkness" on my grandparents' wedding anniversary, composed for 2 January 1735, - and more articles about light to come ;) --Gerda Arendt (talk) 19:12, 2 January 2020 (UTC)
As Wayne Newton said, "Danke Schoen". SchreiberBike | ⌨  21:35, 21 January 2020 (UTC)

DYK for Ave Maria (Biebl)[edit]

Updated DYK query.svgOn 1 January 2020, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Ave Maria (Biebl), which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that Ave Maria, an obscure piece for two men's choirs by Franz Biebl, became a choral standard after Chanticleer made it part of their holiday programs? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Ave Maria (Biebl). You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Ave Maria (Biebl)), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

Gatoclass (talk) 12:01, 1 January 2020 (UTC)

222,222[edit]

Congratulations! Jmar67 (talk) 01:31, 4 January 2020 (UTC)

in 2020, the things you see ;) - thank you for copy-editing, must be a high number of repeated mistakes! --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:18, 4 January 2020 (UTC)

DYK for Psalm 85[edit]

Updated DYK query.svg
Justitia et pax - Brescia - Pinacoteca Tosio-Martinengo - 13-4-2002.jpg
On 28 January 2020, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Psalm 85, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that a verse from Psalm 85 inspired artworks depicting the kiss of Justice and Peace (example shown)? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Psalm 85. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Psalm 85), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

 — Amakuru (talk) 12:01, 28 January 2020 (UTC)

kiss of Justice and Peace --Gerda Arendt (talk) 12:18, 28 January 2020 (UTC)
Nearly 5,000 clicks! Great job on the hook! And the image is beautiful. Yoninah (talk) 14:22, 29 January 2020 (UTC)
thank you, - you wrote the most interesting part of it: that the famous kiss may be a misunderstanding ;) --Gerda Arendt (talk) 14:24, 29 January 2020 (UTC)

You're the sweetest[edit]

Atayebasafeeri.JPG

You always make me smile, thank you for your nice words of encouragement.

I brought you some `Atayef cos baklava is too mainstream ~ Elias Z. (talkallam) 12:57, 31 January 2020 (UTC)

This is so especially sweet, thank you, ~ Elias! How did you know that I just typed a comment that said "Sad." twice? Perfect timing! --Gerda Arendt (talk) 14:10, 31 January 2020 (UTC)
I am sorry for that. Looks like I'm missing out on a lot of Wikidrama. Anyway, I hope WP treats you nicely and you don't consider quitting ever again. ~ Elias Z. (talkallam) 10:45, 1 February 2020 (UTC)
As I said there: I stubbornly stay ;) --Gerda Arendt (talk) 10:49, 1 February 2020 (UTC)

DYK for Die Himmel rühmen des Ewigen Ehre[edit]

Updated DYK query.svgOn 2 February 2020, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Die Himmel rühmen des Ewigen Ehre, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that "Die Himmel rühmen!" ('The heavens praise'), which begins an 1803 lieder collection by Beethoven setting Gellert's paraphrase of Psalm 19 to music, is also the title of a concert series by pop singer Heino? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Die Himmel rühmen des Ewigen Ehre. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Die Himmel rühmen des Ewigen Ehre), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

 — Amakuru (talk) 12:02, 2 February 2020 (UTC)

The first in 2020 topic Beethoven, and second in psalms, for a pic of the composer from that year see above. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 12:53, 2 February 2020 (UTC)

DYK for Maria, Königin des Friedens[edit]

Updated DYK query.svg
Gottfried böhm, pilgrimage church, neviges 1963-1972 01.jpg
On 10 February 2020, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Maria, Königin des Friedens, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that Maria, Königin des Friedens (pictured), a Brutalist pilgrimage church in Neviges, Germany, has become architect Gottfried Böhm's signature building? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Maria, Königin des Friedens. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Maria, Königin des Friedens), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

Gatoclass (talk) 12:03, 10 February 2020 (UTC)

The architect just celebrated 100! I took one of the images, but not the lead ... - album here --Gerda Arendt (talk) 12:14, 10 February 2020 (UTC)

A hello[edit]

Just popping in to leave a greeting. First, thanks for all your excellent work on the wiki. I appreciate all the encouragement you've given me. --LilHelpa (talk) 00:44, 16 February 2020 (UTC)

LilHelpa, thank you, great helper! I remember how you made the very beginning easy for me! --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:47, 16 February 2020 (UTC)

Beethoven[edit]

Beethoven Hornemann.jpg
Beethoven in 1803

Good morning! Other than Bach, Beethoven is my favorite classical composer. The first time I heard 'Moonlight Sonata' was when I was eight years old when my Mom played it on our piano. It touched my heart deeply. God bless. -- Gwillhickers (talk) 04:43, 22 February 2020 (UTC)

Thank you, Gwillhickers! Rather similar memories: at age 10, I began piano lessons, and one of the first records my mother bought contained that 14th sonata, performed by Friedrich Gulda. I played Für Elise rather soon, and it became my father's favourite, played on all his birthdays. I learned the first movement of the sonata in self-study, but wouldn't manage the third which impresses me the deepest. - I changed the header, - it's his year! Memories of singing Die Himmel rühmen des Ewigen Ehre and Choral Fantasy date back to age 12. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:07, 22 February 2020 (UTC)

DYK for Alte Liebe[edit]

Updated DYK query.svgOn 28 February 2020, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Alte Liebe, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that Alte Liebe (Old Love) is a novel about a couple married for 40 years, told by a couple married longer but separated, with chapters written alternately by wife and husband? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Alte Liebe. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Alte Liebe), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

Wug·a·po·des 01:24, 28 February 2020 (UTC)

ALte Liebe - old love. In the book, a couple married during the German student movement. - In memory of Käthe, married in the 1970s. Part of my February flowers. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:20, 28 February 2020 (UTC)

German authors and former spouses Elke Heidenreich and Bernd Schroeder on the Blue Sofa, 2001.
So I found this photo of the authors together. It's not very good, but is it better than none? Also for the Bernd Schroeder article? --GRuban (talk) 16:08, 28 February 2020 (UTC)
Yes!! thank you! - We have a rather good one of her but I found it unfair to use for the joint venture. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 16:14, 28 February 2020 (UTC)

Infobox book[edit]

I am helping with Sixto-Clementine Vulgate. I do not want to italicize the IB title but cannot resolve the problem. There is a parameter to force it but it doesn't seem to work. Any ideas? Otherwise I will ask on the template's talk page. The idea here is that the English title is an informal one and should not be italicized. Jmar67 (talk) 22:52, 28 February 2020 (UTC)

Good idea to ask on the template talk. It should not have the title italic, when the article title is not, per the parameter. Never had that problem, sorry. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 23:22, 28 February 2020 (UTC)
Perhaps RexxS would know? - We don't talk about the article title style - which works - but the title in the infobox itself. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 23:26, 28 February 2020 (UTC)
I have a solution, but it will need consensus to change the main infobox template. --RexxS (talk) 02:41, 29 February 2020 (UTC)
Thank you, both! - see also WP:QAI/Infobox, - and once we are there can we also install a parameter Image_upright? ... which actually should be in every infobox with an image. - Rossini's birthday today, a rare thing ;) --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:14, 29 February 2020 (UTC)
RexxS and all: once in wishlist mood, for Precious anniversaries, I copy a template, and manually change the user name, the image size and the years. I like to do that, because it's moments of remembering that I/we are thankful for a user's contribs. However, for fewer typing errors and life after me - returning from a funeral ... - I could imagine to call a template with a year as the only parameter, which fetches the basepagename and adjusts the imagesize accordingly, 1 year 0.2, 2 - 0.25, 3 - 0,3 ... - so far we have eight, and need to find a way for 10 and beyond to not get much larger ;) - --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:52, 29 February 2020 (UTC)
Precious
Cornflower blue Yogo sapphire.jpg
Eight years!
I've made Template:User QAIbox/auto that you can use like this: {{User QAIbox/auto|years=Four}}. You give the number of years as a capitalised word. It scales up to ten years, but stays at upright=0.65 for anything beyond nine years. It should still accept the other parameters as well, but you shouldn't need them for Precious Anniversary. If you get a chance to test it (maybe just preview it on some pages) and it's okay, perhaps you can add a little documentation to Template:User QAIbox/auto/doc, indicating how you'd like to see it used? --RexxS (talk) 20:27, 29 February 2020 (UTC)
That's lovely, thank you! --Gerda Arendt (talk) 20:31, 29 February 2020 (UTC)
... and used, and modified here to eight, because that's what it is for me know, thanks to a friend. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 08:16, 2 March 2020 (UTC)
RexxS, I was pleased all the time, but fail to find the right id (in the list) for pablo X, - seems to be something about capital or not. - Help? --Gerda Arendt (talk) 09:03, 24 August 2020 (UTC)
I'm not really sure what problem you've run into. If you remember, we only made the sizing to go from one to nine years, and let ten and more all be at the same large size. The template works fine with sixteen years: {{User QAIbox/auto|years=Sixteen}}, but its size is no bigger than for ten years. Capitals make no difference to the template. --RexxS (talk) 16:50, 24 August 2020 (UTC)
RexxS, I tried to describe. The id in the table, for a user's entry, has to be equal to basepagename in the template, or the link from the years doesn't go to the right position. I managed for all so far since we use the template but not for pablo_X (or Pablo_X), and don't know what my mistake is. It's eight years for him, - he was recommended to me by Br'er Rabbit for his eighth anniversary of editing. I remember as if it was yesterday. and liked all encounters with pablo, from that first on, sadly becoming more and more rare. Just look at his present talk page. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 19:45, 24 August 2020 (UTC)
Okay, found it. Pablo X likes to style themselves as "pablo X". But the template uses {{BASEPAGENAME}} to pick up the name and make a link to the id in the table at Wikipedia:WikiProject Quality Article Improvement/Precious, and their BASEPAGENAME is actually "Pablo X". Because links to anchors are case-sensitive (and the id creates an anchor), the link generated (Wikipedia:WikiProject Quality Article Improvement/Precious#Pablo X) didn't have an id (anchor) in the table that matched. I've just changed the id in the table from "pablo_X" to "Pablo_X" (their real name). The anchor now matches the link and it works as intended. It looks like you need to make sure that values for id in the table match the actual BASEPAGENAME (which almost certainly begins with a capital). Cheers --RexxS (talk) 20:28, 24 August 2020 (UTC)
Thank you for confirming that. I was sure I had tried that as well, but shouldn't be too sure. Thank you! --Gerda Arendt (talk) 20:31, 24 August 2020 (UTC)
Wow, I never knew that you were such a Machiavellian mastermind. You've been behind everything, haven't you? lol ~ HAL333 15:02, 2 September 2020 (UTC)

DYK for Jessye Norman[edit]

Updated DYK query.svg
Jessye Norman- In Conversation with Tom Hall (15977754135) (cropped).jpg
On 29 March 2020, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Jessye Norman, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that soprano Jessye Norman (pictured), whose voice was described as a "grand mansion of sound", performed at U.S. presidential inaugurations and sang La Marseillaise at the French Revolution's bicentennial? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Jessye Norman. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Jessye Norman), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

— Maile (talk) 00:01, 29 March 2020 (UTC)

I feel blessed, having heard her in person at Carnegie Hall. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:14, 29 March 2020 (UTC)

Request[edit]

Detail of the Gobnait window, 1916

Planning on taking the Honan Chapel article to PR in 14 days, and would be very appreciative if you could take a look, given how helpful you have been in the past. Have a strong connection to the building; lived (in a hovel) for two years literally 2 minutes walk from it as a student, and for the last 20 years the Gobnait window works for me in about a million ways. My best friend was married there in 2005. Anyway, if you get a chance. Ceoil (talk) 21:56, 4 April 2020 (UTC)

Thank you, Ceoil, for an irresistible invitation. Once someone said to me "whatever works for you" and how true that is. The Opera house pictured was 2 minutes away from where I lived as a student, and I visited frequently. Back then, we sang St. Matthew Passion one year, and St. John Passion the other. This year, It would have been Matthew again, see above. What works for me is the song of defiance, also see above, which I sang even before, in Bach's incredible version. GA nom failed. Lyrics so suitable to these times: "weg mit allen Schätzen" - away with all treasures - and he composes weg, weg, weg, weg ... - but "ich steh hier und singe" - here I stand and sing. (I used it in defiance of arbcom already, as you probably know, and I was recently reminded.) - What keeps me busy is making articles decent of people who recently died - many. I haven't looked today yet. Then, I'll turn to that wonderful image, please be patient. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 05:54, 5 April 2020 (UTC)
I looked now - only looked, and it's another one with many pictures which make placement tricky. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 09:25, 5 April 2020 (UTC)

(more in the archive)

DYK for Three Latin Motets[edit]

Updated DYK query.svgOn 7 April 2020, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Three Latin Motets, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that Three Latin Motets, Charles Villiers Stanford's only church music not in English, was dedicated to Alan Gray, who succeeded him as organist at Trinity College, Cambridge, and the college's choir? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Three Latin Motets. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Three Latin Motets), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

--valereee (talk) 00:01, 7 April 2020 (UTC)

One of them is Beati quorum via integra est. - Difficult to translate, the tricky word being "integra" which is not easy in both English and German, - looking for an adjective related to integrity, for the way, which is the way of living, not just walking. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 06:18, 7 April 2020 (UTC)
We sang it last on 8 March. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 08:46, 7 April 2020 (UTC)
I found this about it: “I am always delighted when I hear sung the words from a psalm, “Beati quorum via integra est” – blessed are they whose way is “whole”. “Integra” is full of resonances: uncorrupt, integrated, wholesome, complete. Yet perhaps our splendour, if humanity has any, ultimately lies in the split in our nature, and how we handle it...“ [Chris Clarke, “Wholeness”, in Knowing, Doing, and Being: New Foundations for Consciousness Studies (2015), p. 157]. His Latin may be better than his wisdom, but if I were you I should use his translation. Moonraker (talk) 02:30, 8 April 2020 (UTC)
Thank you, taken. Now I'd also be interested in the meaning in Hebrew. Yoninah? --Gerda Arendt (talk) 05:51, 8 April 2020 (UTC)
The Hebrew word, תְמִֽימֵי־דָ֑רֶךְ, can be literally read as "pure in the way." El_C 23:57, 8 April 2020 (UTC)
That sounds great, but would need some explanation for me. I like a positive word like "pure", compared to "blameless", "undefiled", and also to the frequent "perfect", because nobody is ... - The recordings sounds pure ;) - Yoninah, I think some of this should go to Psalm 119, even if we can't quote the whole long thing. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 06:19, 9 April 2020 (UTC)
The Hebrew word תְמִֽימֵי means as Moonraker says "wholesome", also "straightforward", "sincere". "Purehearted" would work. Yoninah (talk) 18:16, 9 April 2020 (UTC)
I had better add that the word “via” has most of the meanings of “way”, and in this psalm it plainly doesn’t mean something you stand on! So the word way might as well be kept. It’s a matter of which other word to use for the metaphor, and wholesome may be better than whole. Moonraker (talk) 19:21, 9 April 2020 (UTC)

On infoboxes[edit]

Gerda, are you not still limited to two comments per infobox discussion? (I'm thinking of here). I should not like to see you getting into any trouble. Best--Smerus (talk) 12:23, 10 April 2020 (UTC)

That provision has now expired (although I hope I don't need to remind you all that arguing about infoboxes is never going to end well for anyone). ‑ Iridescent 12:46, 10 April 2020 (UTC)

Gerda's dream[edit]

... has expired in 2015 - I wonder when the new times begin when those boxes are treated nothing special, like tables and images, - it could be now, imagine ;) ... imagine how much editors' time could go to something more useful than debate if something meant to help readers (and could be opted out if not wanted) is permitted to help or not. - ps, and see my New year's intentions on top: I normally try to stick to 2 comments voluntarily, in ANY discussion, because it's more polite to other participants (and - selfish - it limits my waste of time). - Today's topic: Psalm 31, DYK? --Gerda Arendt (talk) 12:51, 10 April 2020 (UTC)
I think you are wise - I will try in future to limit myself to two comments as well. Hope you are keeping well - I am finding lockdown very tedious. Best--Smerus (talk) 15:20, 10 April 2020 (UTC)
I answered below. and gave it a Passion header. For the infoboxes, I began hoping in 2013. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 06:08, 11 April 2020 (UTC)

St John Passion 2020, in defiance[edit]

Thank you ;) - Normally, we would have sung St Matthew Passion, instead, I sang along in the St John Passion from Bach's burial place in the Thomaskirche, and sometimes cried. Exceptional tenor who took ALL roles, with keyboard (switching harpsichord and organ) and percussion. They left out some arias. Great moments! (... such as "kreuzige" hissed to drums, and "es ist vollbracht" first as Jesus, then an octave lower than in the alto aria, and at its end high, as if uplifted ...) - link Carus bachfest --Gerda Arendt (talk) 18:09, 10 April 2020 (UTC)
A header for it: Passion trotz(t) Pandemie, which is hard to translate. Suggestions welcome. Trotz (defiance) is a key word in Jesu, meine Freude (which I quoted after the arb case, to connect to the beginning). --Gerda Arendt (talk) 06:08, 11 April 2020 (UTC)

DYK for Thou knowest, Lord, the secrets of our hearts (Purcell)[edit]

Updated DYK query.svgOn 17 April 2020, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Thou knowest, Lord, the secrets of our hearts (Purcell), which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that the second of Henry Purcell's two settings of Thou knowest, Lord, the secrets of our hearts was composed in an earlier style for the funeral of Queen Mary II of England? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Thou knowest, Lord, the secrets of our hearts (Purcell). You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Thou knowest, Lord, the secrets of our hearts (Purcell)), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

--valereee (talk) 00:01, 17 April 2020 (UTC)

Finally. We sang it on 8 March, and put the secrets of our hearts into it, "spare us, Lord!" ... --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:02, 17 April 2020 (UTC)
Henry Purcell Closterman.jpg

Did you know ... that Henry Purcell
composed basically two settings of
Thou knowest, Lord, the secrets of our hearts,
a complex one early,
and a simple one for the burial of Queen Mary?

(in memory of B.W.)

Precious[edit]

Barnstar of Diligence.png The Barnstar of Diligence
I'm back from a really long Wikibreak, and I am absolutely astounded at how you single-handedly continued the tradition of recognizing fellow Wikipedians for their great work at Wikipedia:WikiProject Quality Article Improvement/Precious for the past eight years. Absolutely stunning. I truly wish you could have met Phaedriel; you really inherited her spirit of fostering WikiLove! bibliomaniac15 23:34, 17 April 2020 (UTC)
Thank you, Bibliomaniac15, blushing to a colour like the strawberries below, and mostly: welcome back!! - You may have noticed (look for the Yogo above) that I try to prepare the award for a time after me, and you are most welcome - as some others do already, and everybody is invited to - to pass the award. We sometimes have two one day, and miss days, - doesn't matter ;) - It's good for me to do first thing in the morning: to look around for the many reasons to be thankful. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 06:28, 18 April 2020 (UTC)

Thank you![edit]

BWV 232 Incipit Nr. 7 Gratias.svg Thank you!
Your untiring work to let people know that they have been seen and appreciated makes this place better. Thank you. bonadea contributions talk 22:51, 2 May 2020 (UTC)
Thank you, blushing. I took the liberty of enlarging the pic, because while I recognized it, it may have been too small for others. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 22:58, 2 May 2020 (UTC)
Good idea. I did think that the image was a bit small, but it was almost 1am when I posted it and I was too tired to think of doing that! In my opinion, the Mass in B Minor is one of the most wonderful pieces of music in the world (if you can call that huge work a "piece of music"!). I have been privileged to perform it twice with my choir, and I think our choir director is considering it for the spring of 2022 again. I am very much an amateur chorist, but am fortunate to be part of a rather good choir. I hope we'll get back to rehearsing and performing again in August, but who knows... --bonadea contributions talk 13:11, 3 May 2020 (UTC)
bonadea, I agree about it's magnificence. Sung unforgettably in a concert for Peace here, at the Wiesbadener Bachwochen, again unforgettably here the day before the Iraq war ultimatum (you should have heard us sing Dona nobis pacem!!!), and last in 2013, my perspective pictured in my work of love, here, promised. Dona nobis pacem, - same music as Gratias, very meaningful. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 22:10, 3 May 2020 (UTC)

DYK for Hans Herbert Jöris[edit]

Updated DYK query.svgOn 15 May 2020, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Hans Herbert Jöris, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that Hans Herbert Jöris conducted the world premiere of Giselher Klebe's one-act opera Das Rendezvous, composed for the 125th anniversary of the Staatsoper Hannover? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Hans Herbert Jöris. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Hans Herbert Jöris), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

— Maile (talk) 00:02, 15 May 2020 (UTC)

Did you know that Hans Herbert Jöris conducted the first church concert I ever heard, with a Bach cantata? - 15 May is his birthday, and Monteverdi's. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 06:47, 15 May 2020 (UTC)

ITN recognition for Anna and Bernhard Blume[edit]

Ambox current red.svgOn 23 June 2020, In the news was updated with an item that involved the article Anna and Bernhard Blume, which you nominated and updated. If you know of another recently created or updated article suitable for inclusion in ITN, please suggest it on the candidates page. Stephen 02:26, 23 June 2020 (UTC)
Bazon Brock - Der Tod muss abgeschafft werden - Prägeschild in Berlin Hackesche Höfe.jpg

Did you know ...

... that the art photographers Anna and Bernhard Blume
created Kitchen Frenzy and Pure Reason?

... that in 1968, the German artist Bazon Brock created
a sign in the style of a high voltage warning saying
that "death must be abolished ..."?

A birthday[edit]

Happy birthday? El_C 05:13, 27 June 2020 (UTC)

not mine today (but close) - want to add? - Today is the birthday of one with the river Rhine. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 05:20, 27 June 2020 (UTC)
Cool, sounds primordial. El_C 05:42, 27 June 2020 (UTC)
What can you do in restricted times? I'm on my way to make the meetings real, in portions, a hike to that meadow, another around the rose town, a bike tour along the Rhine from Oppenheim and another to the Kreuzkapelle, a lunch overlooking the Rhine in Mainz, and church services happened already, more hikes and even organ concerts are planned, and for me, that's even better than seeing them all the same day as 2 decades ago. It helps to live in a blessed area where others come for vacation. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 06:23, 27 June 2020 (UTC)
(Belated apologies.) That sounds absolutely serene. Petting a chipmunk is also nice. Anyway, A very merry Unbirthday to you! To you! El_C 01:30, 29 June 2020 (UTC)
Happy petting that happy chipmunk! - Thank you for the wishes, coming a good day, 20 years OTD that the Chanticleer sang at Unionskirche, Idstein, as part the Rheingau Musik Festival, and I was permitted to take photos during their rehearsal, - such wonderful and still vivid memories of walking around in a great building filled with unbelievable harmony. I wanted to make a box above but perhaps better to keep it down here, modestly. What I did was begin the years with their sounds, DYK? Look above for Chanticleer. - This year, a cellist - subject of my first article here, and I never wanted to write any other, only there was this red link ... - wants to play for me and my guests, as many birthdays before, which is more tricky to arrange. My favourite church (pictured above) is too small (36 people right now), the next holding 100 but too resonant (looking forward to an organ concert there on Saturday, which was planned for March), - perhaps I'll ask Unionskirche ... - Would you like to tell me a place and a song for my virtual sing-along? --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:11, 29 June 2020 (UTC)
I found the 2000 program, - first half sacred music by William Cornysh, Tomás Luis de Victoria, Vasily Polikarpovich Titov and John Taverner, and then music by Alberto Ginastera, Benitez Valencia, Astor Piazzolla, George Gershwin, Nacio Herb Brown, and spirituals. We were taken by the black voice of Eric Alatorre, who retired only last year, as I found out today. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 18:45, 29 June 2020 (UTC)

DYK for Meine engen Grenzen[edit]

Updated DYK query.svgOn 12 July 2020, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Meine engen Grenzen, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that "Meine engen Grenzen" ("My narrow limits"), a new hymn with text by Eugen Eckert and a melody by Winfried Heurich, was recorded with a band? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Meine engen Grenzen. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Meine engen Grenzen), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

Cwmhiraeth (talk) 12:01, 12 July 2020 (UTC)

Happy First Edit Day![edit]

Thank you, - I remember well, first article deleted within minutes, but then I received great help, first by Cmadler, then Michael Bednarek (see above), LilHelpa (see just above), Jerome Kohl, and all you others (in the order of appearance). Thank you! (If I think I missed you, let me know, right here. )-Gerda Arendt (talk) 05:20, 2 August 2020 (UTC)

Happy First Edit Day![edit]

Balloons-aj.svg Hey, Gerda Arendt. I'd like to wish you a wonderful First Edit Day on behalf of the Wikipedia Birthday Committee!
Have a great day!
Megan Barris (Lets talk📧) 09:38, 2 August 2020 (UTC)
Face-smile.svg
Thank you, more detail above ;) --Gerda Arendt (talk) 09:40, 2 August 2020 (UTC)

Today's Wikipedian 10 years ago[edit]

Awesome
Cscr-featured.svg
Ten years!

Thank you for your many years as one of Wikipedia's shining stars. Your exemplary work is greatly appreciated! MANdARAX  XAЯAbИAM 07:15, 3 August 2020 (UTC)

Thank you, blushing. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:16, 3 August 2020 (UTC)
Congratulation! Grimes2 (talk) 08:22, 3 August 2020 (UTC)
Thank you, and even more for updating Leon Fleisher! A nice gift: Monteverdi's operas are a featured topic now!! We can't thank Brian enough for being such an inspiration, still! DYK, today is also his day of Today's Wikipedian 10 years ago ;) - Thank you, Aza, for the initiative to honour him. Giants2008, letting you know for the FLN above. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 13:58, 3 August 2020 (UTC)

Bon anniversaire.[edit]

I got a reminder.

So I hope you are well, and you can't say I forgot. Face-smile.svg

Take care.

Begoon 19:01, 3 August 2020 (UTC)

How lovely to see you "alive". 'cause missing the dead is bad enough. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 19:07, 3 August 2020 (UTC)

A barnstar for you![edit]

Kindness Barnstar Hires.png The Random Acts of Kindness Barnstar
Thanks you for your constant positivity and friendliness. This platform needs more people like you. Hope you're having a great day! ~ HAL333 20:50, 11 August 2020 (UTC)
Thank you, blushing a bit. Did you see 3RR above? I enjoy the softer tones ;) - DId you know that Erich Gruenberg was the lead violinist for Sgt. Pepper? I didn't , and keep learning? --Gerda Arendt (talk) 21:02, 11 August 2020 (UTC)
No I didn't - that's very interesting. I'm actually currently burning through the discography of another great British band: The Kinks. ~ HAL333 02:05, 16 August 2020 (UTC)

Your GA nomination of Nun jauchzt dem Herren, alle Welt[edit]

The article Nun jauchzt dem Herren, alle Welt you nominated as a good article has passed Symbol support vote.svg; see Talk:Nun jauchzt dem Herren, alle Welt for comments about the article. Well done! If the article has not already appeared on the main page as a "Did you know" item, or as a bold link under "In the News" or in the "On This Day" prose section, you can nominate it within the next seven days to appear in DYK. Bolded names with dates listed at the bottom of the "On This Day" column do not affect DYK eligibility. Message delivered by Legobot, on behalf of Aza24 -- Aza24 (talk) 22:41, 28 August 2020 (UTC)

DYK for Rhythm Is It![edit]

Updated DYK query.svgOn 31 August 2020, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Rhythm Is It!, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that Rhythm Is It! is a 2004 documentary film about 250 public school students trained by Royston Maldoom to dance Stravinsky's Le Sacre du printemps with the Berlin Philharmonic? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Rhythm Is It!. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Rhythm Is It!), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

Cwmhiraeth (talk) 00:02, 31 August 2020 (UTC)

I remember well. Education of an energetic kind, for kids from many cultural backgrounds to work towards one goal, - a model for us all. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 08:42, 31 August 2020 (UTC)

TFA Monteverdi Vespers 1 September[edit]

Vespro della Beata Vergine
Monteverdi Marienvesper Altus.jpg
Magnificat from the alto partbook of Monteverdi's
Vespro della Beata Vergine kept in the Vatican Library

This article is about the Vespers for the Blessed Virgin, or Vespers of 1610, by Claudio Monteverdi. His opera L'Orfeo, premiered in 1607, is the first opera still widely performed, and the Vespers are similarly exceptional. Monteverdi, aspiring to a better positiom than court musician in Mantua, demonstrated the broad range of his abilities, writing with a post in Rome in mind, but instead went to San Marco, Venice, a few years later. We don't know if the music was ever performed completely during his lifetime, nor if he actually expected it to be performed that way. Certainly musicologists and musicians have been fascinated from the 20th century on. Monteverdi set much more text than the usual 5 psalms + Magnificat, and required a 10-part choir in one psalm, and a rich orchestra. He combined the ever-present Gregorian chant with dramatic and virtuoso elements from the emerging opera, and offered a great diversity in musical styles and expression. Here is a short introduction, - in the background you hear an extreme performance, a recording which renders only the music Monteverdi wrote (and no additions to make it a proper liturgical vespers service), with 10 singers, and soloists for all instruments. I heard them in concert at the Rheingau Musik Festival which will be missed this year.

The article is the work of many over many years ... The main inspiration came from Brian Boulton who wrote the articles about the composer and his operas, and who generously left me the sources he had collected, the greatest honour I received in my ten years here. (from the FAC)

(1 September 2020 - 1 September was the day of the dedication in 1610, and of our concert in 2019)

Congrats[edit]

On your TFA. I have enjoyed reading it. Altamel (talk) 06:52, 1 September 2020 (UTC)

Maybe one day you could do the same for Selva Morale e Spirituale? I think the Beatus Vir Primo is the best walking bass in musical history (fight me!). When we were rehearsing this, our conductor was ill one day so we had Robert Hollingworth dep for him. The band for the performance included the English Cornett and Sackbut Ensemble, and I am still friendly with some of them now, since my friend Catherine often books them for the concerts I do with her. Guy (help! - typo?) 07:52, 21 September 2020 (UTC)

I wrote Selva, but would rather take the Brahms Requiem to FA. Struggling with Mass in B minor, since 2012, and Jesu, meine Freude (which I find even more defiant than the Brahms) right now. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:57, 21 September 2020 (UTC)
Guy, what do you think about the thread a bit above, named Silence (which was much longer, archived), or - similar topic on ARCA which I revived today because I believe we really need to call a war ended that ended long ago, only some overlooked that. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 09:33, 21 September 2020 (UTC)

Yesterday's horrible news[edit]

What a huge huge loss. I didn't even know him that well, but I am devastated. DBaK (talk) 08:57, 7 September 2020 (UTC)

So am I. - We talk about the memory of Jerome Kohl, with whom I had good conversations over ten years, - many topics, such as Schnebel (he said: "Sad to see another great music maker gone") and Stockhausen's Originale which I saw, and he said "Fantastic! What an experience it must have been! Thank you for telling me!". --Gerda Arendt (talk) 20:52, 7 September 2020 (UTC)

Silence[edit]

While I agree with the sentiments of this post, I think it's worth quoting a bit of Wikipedia:Ignore all dramas : "Say something there only if you can say it well and politely, and it helps all concerned, causing no further harm." I have to say that for those who understand what you mean, you're telling them something they already know, and for those who don't (or don't want to), you're just going to antagonise them : "none so deaf as those who will not hear". Let those who want to tear each other's heads off do so and go about your business improving the encyclopedia; hopefully when the dust is settled around the charred remains of burned-out editors, some may think "you know what, we really should have looked at that picture of a kitten after all". Ritchie333 (talk) (cont) 13:12, 7 September 2020 (UTC)

You just caused further harm sadness. I replied to a post on your talk, where I had mentioned silence, and (instead of silence) was questioned further. Silence please. I miss a great person. There's a picture of a kitten, - hope you like it. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 18:07, 7 September 2020 (UTC)

...

It crossed my mind that Licht - Jerome's great work - matches my topic of the year - vision - perfectly. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 05:20, 9 September 2020 (UTC)

It crossed my mind further that perhaps I should not be silent about being just an observer of the infobox wars (or however they might be called). I was wounded, and had enough, deciding to step away in 2015. - Let's look at the current discussion. It could have been so short. Nominator presents reasoning per the MoS to uncollaps an infobox, asking for good reasons not to follow the MoS in the specific case. There are no good (= factual) reasons. So instead, we argue about not so good reasons, on several noticeboards, with rising heat. I try to be silent but sometimes the level of frustration is too high. It's a complete waste of everybody's time. The simple answer to a good proposal could be "Why not?" - The Autobahnkirche Siegerland is a place for silence. Thank you for watching, made nice stats. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:25, 10 September 2020 (UTC)

DYK for Matthias Hölle[edit]

Updated DYK query.svgOn 8 September 2020, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Matthias Hölle, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that Matthias Hölle, a regular bass singer at the Bayreuth Festival, appeared in the world premieres of Stockhausen's Donnerstag aus Licht and Samstag aus Licht at La Scala in Milan? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Matthias Hölle. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Matthias Hölle), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 00:01, 8 September 2020 (UTC)

This DYK was worded as a greeting to my friend Jerome Kohl who wrote all we know about Stockhausen and works. It became a tribute in memoriam, In Freundschaft. The piece was played at a concert dedicated to William Waterhouse. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:36, 8 September 2020 (UTC)

Dahlias, Walsdorf.jpg
a minute of silence

a minute of silence

Did you know ... that Matthias Hölle,
a regular bass singer at the Bayreuth Festival,
appeared in the world premieres of
Stockhausen's Donnerstag aus Licht and Samstag aus Licht
at La Scala in Milan? (8 September 2020)

... that cellist, composer, and conductor Rudolf Hindemith
was the brother of the famous Paul Hindemith,
with whom he played in the Amar Quartet,
but later used pseudonyms to hide the relation? (7 September 2020)

DYK for Autobahnkirche Siegerland[edit]

Updated DYK query.svg
Autobahnkirche Siegerland 01.jpg
On 9 September 2020, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Autobahnkirche Siegerland, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that Autobahnkirche Siegerland (pictured), a 2013 road church on the A 45 that looks like a piece of folded paper, is always open? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Autobahnkirche Siegerland. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Autobahnkirche Siegerland), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

Cwmhiraeth (talk) 00:01, 9 September 2020 (UTC)

Thank you, - one of my places ;) --Gerda Arendt (talk) 05:20, 9 September 2020 (UTC)

As you did ask for me to keep a look out, I fixed the fact tags. Ritchie333 (talk) (cont) 12:21, 9 September 2020 (UTC)
That's excellent, Ritchie, thank you! Biking Weikersheim to Wertheim, a first for me, also excellent. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 20:34, 9 September 2020 (UTC)
I took almost the same pic, evening, someone leaning out the right window, - perhaps I'll upload it, - of course I believe that mine is better ;) - nice stats for the place of silence, 9.707. Thanks all for interest! --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:31, 10 September 2020 (UTC)

Thank you[edit]

Der Tod ist verschlungen in den Sieg. Scholl-Denkmal, München.jpg Tod, wo ist dein Stachel, Hölle, wo ist dein Sieg? For the very interesting article about Franz Leuninger --Maleschreiber (talk) 03:47, 12 September 2020 (UTC)

Thank you, just what I needed. (Funeral 17 September, in Munich, where the memorial is.) Thank you also for excellent copy-editing. The article is the result of many users working together, - I hope they watch here. I couldn't believe - prompted by the death of his nephew - that he had no article. I love that music, sung in Hannover and Wiesbaden. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 06:00, 12 September 2020 (UTC)

I like the setting of this text in Brahms' Ein Deutsches Requiem. Guy (help! - typo?) 07:46, 21 September 2020 (UTC)
That's what we mean. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:48, 21 September 2020 (UTC)

DYK for Moop Mama[edit]

Updated DYK query.svgOn 15 September 2020, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Moop Mama, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that Moop Mama, a band of seven brass players, two drummers, and a rapper, began "guerilla concerts" in Munich's Englischer Garten in 2009? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Moop Mama. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Moop Mama), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

Cas Liber (talk · contribs) 12:04, 15 September 2020 (UTC)

Moop Mama Rocken am Brocken 2015 08.jpg

listen to Meermenschen (people from the sea), in rehearsal --Gerda Arendt (talk) 12:43, 15 September 2020 (UTC)

Some recognition[edit]

Music barnstar.png The Music Barnstar
Thanks for all the work you have done on music articles! Amitchell125 (talk) 21:55, 8 October 2020 (UTC)
music in my ears ;) - thank you, enjoying the birthday celebrations for a man with a tough life and the death he wanted - listen to a friend playing his music --Gerda Arendt (talk) 21:58, 8 October 2020 (UTC)

You're very clever[edit]

L'infobox infernale
Opera semiseria in 25 acts by John Smith
Ubud Cremation 4.jpg
The final scene
TranslationThe Hellish Infobox
LibrettistJane Doe
LanguageItalian
Premiere
23 December 2005 (2005-12-23)
Wikipedia
WebsiteInfobox wars

I must say you're very clever to be able to align the pictures nicely without Br'er Rabbit or RexxS helping. I always make futile attempts and then end up asking RexxS. Very envious of your skills! Little Stupid talk, 09:36, 14 October 2020 (UTC).

PS, yikes, I see a picture of Darwinbish on this page. Hope she hasn't been bothering you! Little Stupid talk, 09:36, 14 October 2020 (UTC).
Gerda has an adequate supply of apples, so fret ye not. Ritchie333 (talk) (cont) 10:08, 14 October 2020 (UTC)
(ec) Darwinbish has stolen grabbed some apples, but I have a large supply. All my technical cleverness comes from the two you mentioned, and Alakzi who showed me how to have pics in one line as here. Thanks to them as long as I can remember, - one banned, one ill, one given up! Look above, RexxS made me a neat template to remember Precious by just changing the number of years celebrated, imagine! (If I'd organise the dates, that might even run without me.) Feel free to use the QAIbox, modeled after the popcorn Br'er gave me as a farewell gift, eighth anniversary now as he mentioned then. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 10:13, 14 October 2020 (UTC)
I would also say that although good editors leave the project, if you look around carefully, you'll see new editors coming up through the ranks and starting to contribute more, like zmbro. Let's show our appreciation for those as well. Ritchie333 (talk) (cont) 10:16, 14 October 2020 (UTC)
Thank you, I like hints for Precious. (I also like others to pass Precious, - no need to wait for me.) I think I do my share of appreciating newcomers, greeting red links on my watchlist, and passing Precious for a first DYK. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 10:21, 14 October 2020 (UTC)
I stole my cutest infobox opera from the 2013 arb workshop pages, image by Br'er, title idea by Voceditenore who also was instrumental in creating the template with Andy, facts somewhat updated. I think we just reached kind of peace there, - imagine (that I was invited to restore "my" infoboxes). All operas by Rossini have an infobox now, not only his latest. Much room for improvements: more appropriate images, for example, and many composers not yet improved. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 10:42, 14 October 2020 (UTC)
ps: 1201 transclusions of the template as of now, but I guess 1 is what you see here ;) --Gerda Arendt (talk) 10:45, 14 October 2020 (UTC)
I thought the image on the right was the result of putting the wrong sort of dash in an FA candidate. Ritchie333 (talk) (cont) 11:01, 14 October 2020 (UTC)
Highly suitable. Jen probably thinks the same about ref details. Thanks for helping her with the flowcharts. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 11:05, 14 October 2020 (UTC)

DYK for Eugen Szenkar[edit]

Updated DYK query.svg
Eugène Szenkar.jpg
On 16 October 2020, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Eugen Szenkar, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that conductor Eugen Szenkar, who promoted works by Béla Bartók and Gustav Mahler in Germany, Russia, and Brazil, caused a "near riot" with the world premiere of The Miraculous Mandarin? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Eugen Szenkar. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Eugen Szenkar), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

Gatoclass (talk) 00:02, 16 October 2020 (UTC)

Fitting to remember this persona non grata on the day I remember that eight years ago, this community banned my friend whose name was not Jack: creative, productive, helpful, witty, charming, a great photographer, a free spirit, miraculous, who said "wikis are not about authoritah they are about collaborations and merit." in September 2012. (You read that in my edit notice, didn't you?) I debated with myself then if I could still be a member of such community.

Agnus Dei - mourning becomes ... (11 April 2012)
Dona nobis pacem - a promise (16 October 2012)
Darwinbish.jpg

Here I am, still singing in defiance. Darwinbish has stolen the apples. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 08:46, 16 October 2020 (UTC)

Dutch composers[edit]

Thanks to a beloved friend I have sung music by Ton de Leeuw, Daan Manneke, Vic Nees, Alphons Diepenbrock, Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck (in the church where he was organist), and probably others, especially if you count Flanders as part of Netherlands (hello Ockeghem and Josquin des Prez!). Who's your favourite Dutch composer of the last 100 years? Do you sing in a choir (or did you, prior to The Event?)

Have you ever heard ro sung Josquin's Nymphes des Bois (déploration de la mort de Johannes Ockeghem)? It is astonishing. Or Vic Nees' Magnificat? Guy (help! - typo?) 22:39, 18 October 2020 (UTC)

Thank you for asking, - for choirs check the infobox on my user page, for more detail of compositions click on "memories" there, several Flemish, - I wrote about Jules van Nuffel's In convertendo. I'm tired right now, past midnight here. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 22:47, 18 October 2020 (UTC)
I have to butt in with how much I adore Nymphes des Bois – part of a popular Medieval/Rennaisance tradition of writing laments when great masters died (see Armes, amours by Andrieu for Machaut, or Ye sacred muses by Byrd for Tallis for other famous examples). If you're interested, this JSTOR article has a list on the page 31. Aza24 (talk) 22:57, 18 October 2020 (UTC)
Aza24, like! Thanks. Aslo mentions Ockeghem's Mort, tu as navré de ton dart, which I have also performed. Guy (help! - typo?) 07:19, 19 October 2020 (UTC)

Stalking precious[edit]

Hi Gerda, I gave someone Precious who I think deserved it and did what I think is the necessary paperwork - hope that's okay. Ritchie333 (talk) (cont) 12:15, 2 November 2020 (UTC)

I just thanked you for that when I noticed. I always try to write a third line, for a more symmetric look of the image. When I translated an early model for the designer, however, it was also too short ;) - Great minds ... - we wrote 2466 almost simultaneously. I fixed "mine" to 2467. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 12:32, 2 November 2020 (UTC)
Okay, main point is you agree the Precious in this instance was a good idea, right? Ritchie333 (talk) (cont) 12:36, 2 November 2020 (UTC)
yes, I do ;) - did you notice that on top, I have two friends pictured whose birthday is today? She plays bass, he plays cello. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 12:52, 2 November 2020 (UTC)
"She plays bass, he plays cello" - invoked Johnny Cash for me - Daddy sang bass, Momma sang tenor". 🤠 I remember receiving my first Precious and how uplifting it was for me - one of the little things that have a huge impact. You're a special lady, Gerda. Atsme 💬 📧 11:44, 3 November 2020 (UTC)
cute! - I also remember my first, then called awesome, 3 August 2010, shared day with Brian (imagine!). 31 October the same year, the giver left over a copyvio discussion (of the TFA about a "witch"), returned without saying so, so left again over an RfA with socking accusations, - that's some of the reasons why WP:QAI is AKA the cabal of the outcast. Feel free to join if you feel you belong there. Will bring you monthly flowers, - that's all. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 11:51, 3 November 2020 (UTC)
I just realised that Keith Emerson would have turned 76 today .... I'll go and find a Hammond L-100 and fetch the carving knives from the kitchen drawer.... interesting factoid, Emerson was influenced by the Scottish group 1-2-3, who were in turn named after Martin (or was it the other way round?) Ritchie333 (talk) (cont) 12:56, 2 November 2020 (UTC)
great! - so many remembered - St. Martin just a few days from now - did you see brother Martin? --Gerda Arendt (talk) 13:02, 2 November 2020 (UTC)
ps: planning to make ecumene/ecumenism my 2021 topic - you heard it here the first time - perhaps to be called unity? See Unionskirche. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 13:11, 2 November 2020 (UTC)--Gerda Arendt (talk) 13:04, 2 November 2020 (UTC)
That would be an ecumenical matter Ritchie333 (talk) (cont) 13:08, 2 November 2020 (UTC)
just received sparkling music by Percy Grainger, - remember, remember? - Something for Martin as well, I'm sure, music and compromise. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 22:18, 2 November 2020 (UTC)
Gerda Arendt, an under-appreciated composer, probably because he wrote a lot of what is sniffily termed "light music". Brian Kay used to play his compositions fairly often on Radio 3, I recall. Guy (help! - typo?) 21:07, 3 November 2020 (UTC)

DYK for Variations for Cello Solo[edit]

Updated DYK query.svgOn 7 November 2020, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Variations for Cello Solo, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that Variations for Cello Solo, premiered by the composer Graham Waterhouse in Vienna in 2020, depicts characteristics of members of his family? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Variations for Cello Solo. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Variations for Cello Solo), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

Cwmhiraeth (talk) 00:02, 7 November 2020 (UTC)

... not without irony, and as it happens DYK #1500 after #1 was about the composer whose birthday was a few days ago, a day before the piece was planned to be played. He also wrote Bright Angel, look: "He recalls a hike which he took, age nine, with his father William Waterhouse. In 1972, when the bassoonist taught for one year at Indiana University, they crossed the Grand Canyon from the North Rim to the South Rim, on the North Kaibab Trail and the Bright Angel Trail." - more memories - Did you know that he wanted to call the variations Väriäschons, as a German might pronounce the English? --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:09, 7 November 2020 (UTC)
Inviting DBaK and Smerus to the party, who know relatives, and Cmadler who helped me with the first article, - back from deletion and to DYK.

A barnstar for you![edit]

Barnstar of Diligence Hires.png The Barnstar of Diligence
DYK 1,500. Ich bin so stolz auf dich. Grimes2 (talk) 09:38, 7 November 2020 (UTC)
grinning a bit --Gerda Arendt (talk) 10:03, 7 November 2020 (UTC)


Dyk1500CE.svg The 1500 DYK Creation and Expansion Medal
Thank you. Grimes2 (talk) 14:06, 7 November 2020 (UTC)
I remember when I was starting to add up DYKs I noticed you had over 400, and thought, "Will I ever get there?" Now I have over 400 and you have ... 1500! You'll always be the front-runner! Congratulations! Yoninah (talk) 21:57, 7 November 2020 (UTC)
Thank you, - it's due to three things: 1) eagerness to share topics I'm interested in, 2) LouisAlain constantly providing people I never heard of (or so I think and later find out I heard that voice but forgot her name), 3) being tired of infobox discussions, the determination to write simple short articles where nobody will discuss the topic, - and right, the last time was January 2018, Psalm 149, remember? (... which therefore didn't go to DYK). Thank you for all the wording help, and next psalm will be 148. - The front-runner became tired at 1666, - we'll see how I long I last, - writing more GAs instead would be nice. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 22:13, 7 November 2020 (UTC)
Wow! That is so impressive, Gerda. —valereee (talk) 13:35, 22 November 2020 (UTC)

Christian Flor again[edit]

Hi Gerda, I thought the Flor article might contain all the German which I attempted to translate, and found in doing so that I had made the elementary misreading of 'Lieder' for 'leider!' (sic). This changes the sense significantly, because Rist is saying that he is concerned with the Wideraufrichtung of the fallen Christenthum - alas! (leider!) - rather than the revival of merely the (Songs) of Christenthum - quite a different scale of challenge, one might think! I apologize for my former inaccuracy. "Re-edification" was a popular English usage for the setting-up-anew of the church in the 17th century, with resonances of OT Zachariah, and makes a fair equivalence for Wideraufrichtung (again-setting-up-rightly). oops, Eebahgum (talk) 07:15, 14 November 2020 (UTC)

Eebahgum, thank you, and no problem with mistakes, I make them all the time. Best probably if you change the article. In modern German, it's Wiederaufrichtung, wieder=again, wider=against, - a similar trap as Lied=song vs. Leid=sorrow. I noticed that the English in the article is longer than the German, and found no time yet to find the rest. Busy with a grim piece for peace. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:47, 14 November 2020 (UTC)
Thank you for having done all that before I asked! --Gerda Arendt (talk) 08:18, 14 November 2020 (UTC)
Thanks, at any rate it makes better sense now. What a very convoluted way they had of expressing themselves. Haha! Eebahgum (talk) 08:40, 14 November 2020 (UTC)
You said that succinctly ;) --Gerda Arendt (talk) 08:42, 14 November 2020 (UTC)

Goodbye and all the best[edit]

Hello, Gerda. I'm sorry to tell you that I have decided to quit the site. I am struggling to find time for it anyway but I've become completely disillusioned and can do without it. I'd like to thank you personally for your kindness, help and friendship. All the best and keep safe. No Great Shaker (talk) 05:47, 16 November 2020 (UTC)

Hello Roy, I am sorry to hear that. I thought this sounded promising. I came to celebrate an anniversary today, and now have to deal with another disappointment, and another helper lost. Isn't it enough that dear people die? ... and good people die (see just above)? Yesterday; I met someone who was away for three years. We'll see. I decided against quitting in 2012, DYK? - I know the feeling, but stubbornly stay. I'll give you Die Fliege (look below the beeches) for your time away. Best wishes for private happiness, and read In loving memory, please. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 08:29, 16 November 2020 (UTC)

Flowers for the Elderly[edit]

Hi Gerda! I hope you're well. Yes, it does make me smile that Die Fliege is getting some love. Face-smile.svg

Since you popped up on my notifications I thought you might appreciate a little update. In the past few months while studying Health and Social Care (retraining to become a care worker) I've started a local community project. Visit Twitter.com/FlowersElderly and follow the link to see the website.

All the best, nagualdesign 22:48, 16 November 2020 (UTC)

That's great news! --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:56, 17 November 2020 (UTC)

Fall[edit]

For some time, starting at look-down in March, I've had weekly bouts of fainting. Medics have diagnosed weak anaemia, treatable by folic acid. I had three months of treatment, but lost balance today injuring myself on my jagged digital spinet. Poetic justice probably, since I've been uploading images of spinets from Commons ... But still shaken.

I think you noticed my upload for the "alleluja" on BWV 140/1. I listened and watched Ton Koopman & co performing BWV 140 with Marcel Ponseele performing the 1st oboe—quite impressive. Have you ever sung that? Mathsci (talk) 12:43, 18 November 2020 (UTC)

Ooooh. Best for your health!!! Yes, one of our favourites, especially that jazzy alto entrance. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 13:43, 18 November 2020 (UTC)
listening to Veldhoven now --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:42, 4 December 2020 (UTC)

DYK for Children's Crusade (Britten)[edit]

Updated DYK query.svgOn 22 November 2020, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Children's Crusade (Britten), which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that Benjamin Britten (pictured) composed Children's Crusade, with text by Bertolt Brecht, as a piece to be performed by children about a group of children in wartime Poland? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Children's Crusade (Britten). You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Children's Crusade (Britten)), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

— Maile (talk) 00:01, 22 November 2020 (UTC)

Heiligenfest, oder Namenstag[edit]

I wonder if you have ever heard Gerald Finzi's For St. Cecilia? I sang it around 40 years ago on the chorus benches at a summer musical festival in Cornwall (shades of Tristan?), sitting next to Jamie Gilchrist, who (unlike me) became a leading tenor soloist. Here he is with the Bournemouth band and singers. The words are here (pdf) - the poem is by Edmund Blunden. The chorus is far too distant for my liking in the recording, but the overall effect is excellent. It lasts about 15 minutes. Happy St. Cecilia's day. MinorProphet (talk) 14:23, 22 November 2020 (UTC)

PS I'm in no hurry at all with 'Zueignung': Gilm and Strauss can wait. MinorProphet (talk) 14:33, 22 November 2020 (UTC)
MinorProphet, thank you for both. Just returned from a lovely walk in the mist. Today proclaiming Mendelssohn's setting of what they called "Sehnsucht" (Yearning, after Psalm 42), and obviously quoting the first musical phrase from Sicut cervus desiderat which brings as back to Zueignung. Two things strike me there: the closeness in letters to Zuneigung, and that it literally means passing ownership to a person (and to do that of a person, even oneself, seems dangerous). Short story in that song: He is sad that he is separated from her who blessed him sinner long ago, and by that magic made him want to belong only to her, but back to the beginning. Sad story in the end. (Needless to say the "He" could also be a woman, and the "She" could also be a man. On Britten's birthday.) - Will listen to the Finzi eventually. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 16:17, 22 November 2020 (UTC)
The poetical I/he/she is one of the less-discussed concepts: those who make it matter only point up their own deficiencies. Bis später >MinorProphet (talk) 16:51, 22 November 2020 (UTC)
As an equally bad horn-player, baritone, and poet, I can only respond with "Blow, bugle, blow, set the wild echoes flying: and answer, echoes, answer, dying, dying, dying." MinorProphet (talk) 16:58, 22 November 2020 (UTC)
Impressive performance of the Finzi, thanks for sharing! - I came to sit next to Andreas Scholl in a performance of the St Matthew Passion. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 17:27, 22 November 2020 (UTC)

Crusade[edit]

I saw from your previous post that you are crusading. I know of the work, and used to have a vinyl of it, but all I have has been in store for 3 years now, so I live like a saint or a mournful knight in my Poeten-stübchen, and wait to dance the night away with the spirit Vikipedia, my Nixe-weib, before returning to the dreary daylight with sagging eyelids. Do you think that picture of BB was taken at the Red House? Looks like Vicky Pedia visited him, too! - Eebahgum (talk) 18:37, 22 November 2020 (UTC)

Thank you, - I try a work by him on his birthday every year since his centenary, DYK? All I know abut the unfortunately only pic we have of him - but better than none - is on the commons. We have several of Donizetti, see a bit below, or browse his operas which now - if we don't have something about the work - show him at an appropriate age. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 18:42, 22 November 2020 (UTC)
Benjamin Britten, London Records 1968 publicity photo for Wikipedia crop.jpg

Did you know ...

... that Benjamin Britten (pictured) composed
Children's Crusade,
with text by Bertolt Brecht,
as a piece to be performed by children
about a group of children
in wartime Poland?

ArbCom 2020 Elections voter message[edit]

Scale of justice 2.svgHello! Voting in the 2020 Arbitration Committee elections is now open until 23:59 (UTC) on Monday, 7 December 2020. All eligible users are allowed to vote. Users with alternate accounts may only vote once.

The Arbitration Committee is the panel of editors responsible for conducting the Wikipedia arbitration process. It has the authority to impose binding solutions to disputes between editors, primarily for serious conduct disputes the community has been unable to resolve. This includes the authority to impose site bans, topic bans, editing restrictions, and other measures needed to maintain our editing environment. The arbitration policy describes the Committee's roles and responsibilities in greater detail.

If you wish to participate in the 2020 election, please review the candidates and submit your choices on the voting page. If you no longer wish to receive these messages, you may add {{NoACEMM}} to your user talk page. MediaWiki message delivery (talk) 02:26, 24 November 2020 (UTC)

Guess what, I know that, and prepared User:Gerda Arendt/ACE 2020. You all are invited to say what you'd answer to the question, which quoted an evaluation of the infobox field from 2018, implying: ... was it a good description then? ... would it describe 2020? I would have liked to discuss answers with the candidates as in previous years, however, that's not possible this year. It could be done right here, though ;) - Summary: we have 12 candidates who - with different kinds of reservations - agree that there is no infobox war obvious in 2020. Which is good, - compare my #vision 2020. I am partial and believe that simple 1RR and limited number of comments in a given discussion might produce better results than discretionary sanctions, and restrictions of specific users, - try it.
This user survived arbcom restrictions, but feels still branded. Did you know that my most militant action in the alleged wars was restoring a preferred version weeks after an edit war (Sparrow Mass). Otherwise, I mainly (too?) often said that I prefer this to this, and by now, the community seems to agree. Please "vote" in that matter, also. Compare #Donizetti. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 09:10, 24 November 2020 (UTC)

Quoted from above: If you want to look closer at "My wish for arbitration is to look at things closely and without prejudice, no more", look. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:45, 21 November 2020 (UTC)

In this context from above

About ArbCom elections[edit]

You didn't tell me that there was a shortage of candidates for ArbCom. -- llywrch (talk) 03:32, 17 November 2020 (UTC)

I didn't know. Actually, my trust in arbitration is limited, so I believe fewer arbitrators who really look may be better than what I saw: one, superficially looking, said that an editor who uncollapsed an infobox (which I had created, even) should be banned for battleground behaviour, and - worse - none of the colleagues intervened, so none of those checked it out. Well, according to the wisdom of Shock Brigade Harvester Boris, arbitration will never admit they made a mistake. "Criticizing the decision after it has been made is pointless." - Go, y'all who feel capable of looking, and nominate yourself. My question this year is much easier than the first. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:56, 17 November 2020 (UTC)
OK, now I understand what you meant by "look" -- to actually investigate the matter. (The latest American jargon for that is "deep dive". Or so I gather.) Anyway, several more have volunteered, so I don't need to feel duty-bound to run this year. Maybe another year if I ever figure out the secret to running a successful campaign. Take care. -- llywrch (talk) 00:29, 18 November 2020 (UTC)
Thank you, - well no, I didn't ask to dive deep, just look. Not every edit that begins on top with an infobox that wasn't at the position in the previous edit means an infobox was added. In the case in question, it was only moved from an unusual position, and uncollapsed. It doesn't take deep diving, just looking at a diff to the end, and not superficially staying at the top, and think you've seen it all, and tell your colleagues your interpretation of said diff, and none of them checks! Just by the mercy of one of them, who also didn't check but said he didn't want to see a good content editor banned with his voice making the difference, my friend wasn't banned. Just to explain my limited trust in arbitration ;) - It's over, but to see candidates still believing the wise restrictions in said case helped towards peace makes me smile. - So arbs, please look, just look carefully. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:11, 18 November 2020 (UTC)

ArbCom question follow-ups[edit]

Hi Gerda, I know this is a pain, but at the pre-election RfC this year, we added a new rule that prevents editors from posting Analysis of candidates, questions or answers on questions to candidate pages (see WP:ACERFC2020#CandidateQs3a). Because of this, I've moved some of your follow-up discussion with Barkeep49 and SMcCandlish to this page and this page, respectively. Sorry for messing with your comments. All the best, Mz7 (talk) 19:49, 18 November 2020 (UTC)

Mz7, do what you have to but how was there any analysis of a candidate? I don't do that, at least I try not analyze and judge. I explained above what makes me smile, but it's nothing personal. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 20:38, 18 November 2020 (UTC)
It seems to me that the new rule wants to move the Q&A pages in the direction of "just Q&A", with room only for very brief "thank you"s and "good answer"s, but anything more substantive should go on a different discussion page. I do see where you are coming from, though, and this will be something that SQL, GeneralNotability, and I will need to ruminate on over the next few weeks regarding how strictly we want to interpret this new rule in the interest of the project. Mz7 (talk) 22:24, 18 November 2020 (UTC)
Thank you for explaining. I have written my collection of answers from 2013, and one thing I intentionally avoided was analyzing. At times I even said if you want that look what others offer. In the two cases moved, there was not even a follow-up question, just more background, one invited by a candidate who said he met the topic in 2019, - lucky person ;) --Gerda Arendt (talk) 22:53, 18 November 2020 (UTC)
If you want to look closer at "My wish for arbitration is to look at things closely and without prejudice, no more", look. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:45, 21 November 2020 (UTC)

Donizetti[edit]

I think that if you're going to remove {{Donizetti operas}} from articles before the deletion discussion is over (which I think is a poor choice) you should at least provide an accurate edit summary indicating what you're doing. This only caught my attention because you removed it from L'ange de Nisida but your edit summary indicated you were simply changing the image. That's discourteous at best. There are others where you are using it as an opportunity to remove the template and add an infobox. It seems at times that you enjoy stoking the fires of the infobox issue. --Laser brain (talk) 04:26, 22 November 2020 (UTC)

Laser brain, several short replies. Today is the day we remember the dead, please look around. Today is Benjamin Britten's birthday, look just above or on top. It's always the day of St Cecilia, patron saint of music, and I always try to honour that, - a little annual crusade of mine. Today I received Wie der Hirsch schreit - Mendelssohn and meditation, a video entitled Sehnsucht (longing is a weak translation), also related to the thought of missed people, for this Sunday. I'm not in the mood to "enjoy", sorry, and I see no fire about {{infobox opera}}, used in all major (important / prominent / significant?) operas.
For context, see Template:Bizet operas, and User:Gerda Arendt/ACE 2020. What would be your answer to the latter? - I was lazy when I added infobox opera to Donizetti's masterworks in 2015, and so a few were stil left over, including this one strange thing about an opera that was never performed. I remembered that the principle author(s) dont like infoboxes, and acted in respect, but saw no reason - and have to type out edit summaries, and spoke about laziness before - to make notice of that particular personal respect. Sometimes I do write long edit summaries. BB stands for me for Benjamin Britten and for Brian Boulton, and all of Brian's featured articles on operas have infoboxes, compare featured topic Monteverdi operas. I follow a great example. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 09:23, 22 November 2020 (UTC)
Yes I believe in "live and let live". I would actually prefer L'ange de Nisida have an infobox, if the template ends up being deleted (rather than just an image of the composer, which adds little value in my opinion). If that surprises you, it shouldn't. My main concern is value for readers, not editor egos. The issue I approached you about is using misleading edit summaries, not "lazy" edit summaries. I saw on my watchlist that the image was changed and I'd like to be able to take that at face value, not to inspect and see that a template was removed that's still under discussion. I hope that's more clear. --Laser brain (talk) 15:23, 22 November 2020 (UTC)
That's more clear, but it was lazy, - that article was the very last of felt 10 that day, and 20 the days before. I am sorry for having being misleading. However, enjoyment of stoking fire was never my thing, and that's what I reacted to. - I believe that it would be helpful if people wouldn't through all infobox topics in one pot. We had a case about infobox opera (or should have had, because its implementation against massive protests was what caused the case request). The topic looks settled once infobox opera was added to the project guidelines. We have infoboxes for classical composers discussed or reverted because there was a general project guideline back in 2010, and some haven't noticed that the arbs ruled, no, it has to be discussed on every individual page. Then we have infoboxes for performers where some of their admirers prefer to see a plain picture. We had discussions if an infobox which is present should be collapsed (which seems nonsense), and some even think an argument about inclusion of one parameter is an infobox discussion. I try to avoid them all. - Thank you for having created the article! - I saw that only now, having looked up the history ;) - It wasn't you who reverted my attempt of an infobox in 2016, and all I remembered was that it wasn't welcome. A deleted template has been replaced by its code here, and something similar could be done for the Donizetti if wanted. If ... --Gerda Arendt (talk) 16:53, 22 November 2020 (UTC)

Instead, we have now Rita, Castor et Pollux and Pelléas et Mélisande (opera). --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:38, 30 November 2020 (UTC)

Uninvolved comment: I agree with LB that edit summaries shouldn't mask "submarine" changes, especially if they're in relation to something of ongoing controversy. I'm not seeing a deletion discussion for that template though (it's not TfD tagged, and its talk page doesn't have an old-TfD tag). It's ... weird. That's not how we typically do navboxes, and having it be auto-collapsing makes it hard to notice it is any form of navigation rather than a picture frame. As noted on my own talk page, I have no opinion on whether opera articles "need" navboxes; it's not my area, and I would probably need to see the draft of the I-box to get a sense whether it would be helpful (while I might have a way better sense of that kind of thing before seeing one in some other topic area, where I'm more familiar with what the parameters are, etc.). Agree with LB that just a picture of the author doesn't help much on an opera page. Isn't there an image somewhere of a surviving manuscript or something? Or an old illustration of a scene being acted?  — SMcCandlish ¢ 😼  06:11, 2 December 2020 (UTC)
SMcCandlish, I explained the edit summary, - I was tired. - There is no ongoing controversy, - infobox opera was made officially available by project opera in 2013, see Wikipedia talk:WikiProject Opera/Archive 115. In the same archive: 17.000 words in the then controversy archived. - The deletion discussion of the template was closed as "no consensus", but was taken to review, which may explain that it is still kind of open and not visible in related pages. ProcrastinatingReader, is this so? - Navigation on Wikipedia is normally at the bottom, and should be for operas the same (see again that 2013 archive). - Anybody is welcome to create an infobox for L'Ange de Nisida, - I won't. I created one back in 2016, and became careful. - Recently, and yes prompted by the perspective of the template being deleted (as already Gonod, Bizet etc), gave all other Donizetti operas an infobox (as I did for the masterworks already in 2016), but some were returned to the old-fashioned style citing the deletion discussion close, and I won't interfere due to my voluntary 1RR (which I even broke already for some of them). - Finally: no, there is no related image because the opera was never performed until 2009. The composer reworked it to La favorite, and its lead image is Today's featured picture ;) --Gerda Arendt (talk) 13:34, 2 December 2020 (UTC)
Not sure. I use XFDCloser, sometimes it doesn't tag talks for some reason, and I haven't figured out yet why. @SMcCandlish: Links: TfD, DRV. That being said, the TfD close doesn't control whether articles use it, and doesn't require or forbid usage of either IB or sidebar on articles. That can be changed by the normal editorial process. ProcrastinatingReader (talk) 15:33, 2 December 2020 (UTC)
The deletion discussion shows fine for the Main topic, Template:Composer sidebar. While the discussion was open, a notice that a template was discussed showed on the sub-templates involved, such as Template:Donizetti operas. That template had no more inclusions after I changed them all, anticipating that it would be deleted, as Gounod's and many others. Now that didn't happen, and the close was used in edit summaries to justify bringing the template back. I don't know how to stop that, and would hate to revert, which would be regarded as battling in the mine-field of infobox disputes. Unfortunately, "normal editorial processes" end when it concerns infoboxes. Help? --Gerda Arendt (talk) 16:58, 2 December 2020 (UTC)
Oh... that. Andy didn't actually tag the child templates, the notice was just passed through Template:Composer sidebar, which is why none of the child templates have the old TfD on talk even though they were discussed. Not much that can be done about that. ProcrastinatingReader (talk) 17:29, 2 December 2020 (UTC)
Ah! That's why I didn't see TfD stuff; it was only the meta-template that got tagged.  — SMcCandlish ¢ 😼 
Fine, it wasn't my question. My question is: how can we fix the Donizetti works where the template was returned citing the close as a reason. The close should NOT be a reason to bring back duplicate information (to the bottom navbox), much of which the mobile readers can't see, while some handicapped readers can't easily access the rest of the content because of trouble to click the "show" button. I can't do it, or would be accused of edit warring and battleground behaviour. [2] --Gerda Arendt (talk) 17:49, 2 December 2020 (UTC)
I think the key was in the (long) TfD nomination statement: "Recent nominations of tens of such templates, on three dates (September 28, October 5, October 8) resulted, without exception, in deletion." The mistake this time, that caused "no consensus" was including all the rest of them at once, plus the meta template, despite the observations in that statement about why previous deletions were successful. The bunches that were deleted were already redundant with our more standard page-bottom navboxes. (Plus all the extra arguments, like accessibility, pointlessness of nav that doesn't look like nav, and whatever else may apply.) The main "nuke it!" trigger for TfD is redundancy, and the second is disuse, so a combination of those a clear path to the bit-bucket for any crappy template. So, make sure that every "child" of this meta-template has a corresponding (and just as good) page-bottom navbar, and work over time to get those used at the articles instead of the sidebar weirdness.
I've said elsewhere that sidebars are used for primarily for the main set of high-level articles in a vital encyclopedia topic (like a major religion, etc.); it's not a form of nav that we use willy-nilly for every topic that has 5 or so related articles. It's a very interruptive form of nav. And this collapsboxing of it just make it useless noise on mobile and for users of screen readers, since they can't expand it. Clearly should be at page bottom. But people are not going to be willing to delete sidebars for which there is no equivalent bottom bar, and, in turn, they will not !vote to delete the meta-template for the lot of them as long as some of them are still in use. TfD for stuff like this has to be approached a lot like RM: mass-nominate things that are so like each other that there is no room for "Oppose, because these two out of the 100 listed are different". It has to be done in groups/clusters, until there's nothing left but a few unique cases to argue out on their own merits, there are alternatives to them that are at least as good, there's already a consistent, multi-decision precedent for the deletions. Very last goes the meta-template, after none of its progeny are left.
PS: Don't take any of this as system-gaming advice, of course. Aattempting to use a stepwise approach like this against things that should not be deleted (or renamed or whatever) won't work, and shouldn't. I'm talking about politics/pyschology of large-scale deletions that actually should proceed. Various editors, thus various XfD-determining clusters of them, are just not willing to mass-delete if there is any differentiation to be made between any of the members of the deletion-nominated class. Even though some are willing to do "Delete all, except X and Y", many are not and will consider the entire nomination faulty/suspect if it includes any "unlike" things".
 — SMcCandlish ¢ 😼  19:39, 2 December 2020 (UTC)

Infobox rules?[edit]

Hi, Gerda. Sorry if this is a sore point, and if it is I won't ask again, but for some reason I got the impression you might know where the rules regarding adding and removing infoboxes to articles are formally written down. I had the impression they were something like "if there has been an infobox in an article for a while, it stays", but I can't find that, and may be getting that confused with the rules on national varieties of English. Could you point me to the rules or arbcom decision or RfC or whatever? --GRuban (talk) 13:43, 30 November 2020 (UTC)

Sorry, rules don't exist. My approach for the last 5 years has been: I add infoboxes to articles I write or improve myself, and leave others as they are. It has done miracles for my health, - just returned from medical check happily. Recently, prompted by operatic side navboxes up for deletion, I have added opera infoboxes again, but have received mixed reviews for doing so. (Check Verdi's Aida + Falstaff - Rossini's Barbiere + Guglielmo Tell - Donizetti's Lucia di Lammermoor + Rita (opera) + L'Ange de Nisida.) In 2013, arbitration only said that it needs discussion on each individual article's talk, which I try to avoid as a massive waste of time, and not promoting kindness. The arbcase also wanted an RfC which hasn't happened, - you could start one ;) - The 2013 rulings are on my 2013 talk, amended a few times, - I was absolved in 2015. Since a later case about civility (with completely different editors as the parties), we have the mixed blessing of discretionary sanctions which if they had any positive effects I haven't noticed. In the past, a few editors have felt free to treat an existing infobox as if it was vandalism, having reverted without even an edit summary years after installation, but most of these editors just left the project vanishing. So far, they have always returned, so I stopped relying on that. I have my private #vision 2020, - about good faith and "have a laugh", and occasionally I need to look at that myself. Nikkimaria, Laser brain and ProcrastinatingReader may be interested. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 14:33, 30 November 2020 (UTC)

In the context:

DYK for For the beauty of the earth (Rutter)[edit]

Updated DYK query.svgOn 26 November 2020, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article For the beauty of the earth (Rutter), which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that in For the beauty of the earth, a 1978 anthem for choir and orchestra, John Rutter gave a 19th-century hymn text a new melody, marking it to be sung "Happily"? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/For the beauty of the earth (Rutter). You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, For the beauty of the earth (Rutter)), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

Best Wishes, Lee Vilenski (talkcontribs) 00:02, 26 November 2020 (UTC)

Happy Thanksgiving if you celebrate that, and happy thanks if not! --Gerda Arendt (talk) 09:18, 26 November 2020 (UTC)

December with Women in Red[edit]

Women in Red logo.svg

--Megalibrarygirl (talk) 16:41, 26 November 2020 (UTC) via MassMessaging

see also conversation at User talk:Rosiestep#November --Gerda Arendt (talk) 09:03, 2 December 2020 (UTC)

DYK for Mihoko Fujimura[edit]

Updated DYK query.svgOn 27 November 2020, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Mihoko Fujimura, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that the Japanese mezzo-soprano Mihoko Fujimura, who appeared as Fricka at the Bayreuth Festival in 2002, toured Mahler's Resurrection Symphony with the CBSO conducted by Andris Nelsons? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Mihoko Fujimura. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Mihoko Fujimura), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

Cwmhiraeth (talk) 00:03, 27 November 2020 (UTC)

... whom I heard in one of the strangest concerts of my life, when the conductor had to be taken to a hospital, feeling weak during the delayed warm-up (air controllers' strike, players and singers were there but instruments came late, - I remember all these singers dressed in black waiting in the cloisters on a summer evening), - and the choral conductor was willing to conduct those symphony parts with singing, which included Urlicht. - ... to the beauty ... --Gerda Arendt (talk) 08:31, 27 November 2020 (UTC)
Abbreviation of City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra is CBSO not BSO. Already noted in Main page errors. Grimes2 (talk) 17:04, 27 November 2020 (UTC)
Yes, and seen, and sorry. I hope someone will fix it, - then I'll fix it here as well. Thank you for having dealt with so many things that lacked references! --Gerda Arendt (talk) 17:10, 27 November 2020 (UTC)

DYK for Macht weit die Pforten in der Welt[edit]

Updated DYK query.svgOn 29 November 2020, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Macht weit die Pforten in der Welt, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that "Macht weit die Pforten in der Welt", written for the Basel Mission, was included with a new melody in Kirchenlied to proclaim Christ the King in opposition to the Nazi regime? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Macht weit die Pforten in der Welt. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Macht weit die Pforten in der Welt), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

—valereee (talk) 00:02, 29 November 2020 (UTC)

Ein Lichtlein brennt[edit]

Advent wreath 2011.jpg

Thank you, Gerda. That was kind. --Frans Fowler (talk) 04:16, 29 November 2020 (UTC)

Macht hoch die Tür - danke!
Macht weit die Pforten in der Welt
Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland
Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland
Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland
new: Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:11, 29 November 2020 (UTC)

Re:Welcome again[edit]

Hi, I'm not that new, I already have a few editions :) As for the edit war, better look at this user's page. Dude wants to delete content on his talk page, instead of writing back to me honestly (he calls it rubbish, by the way). I wanted to let it go, but since you did respond - I invite you to read it and reprimand it. Najgorszakomediaromantyczna (talk) 20:31, 1 December 2020 (UTC)

When someone reverts you on his or her talk, go away. You can do the same on your talk, did you know? When someone reverts you in an article, discuss the matter on the article talk page and find consensus for what you want changed. It's so simple. I am on a voluntary 1RR (one revert back) - see #vision 2020. It really helps. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 20:38, 1 December 2020 (UTC)
Ok, thats some point :) Najgorszakomediaromantyczna (talk) 21:16, 1 December 2020 (UTC)
Thank you for understanding ;) --Gerda Arendt (talk) 21:32, 1 December 2020 (UTC)

Hi Gerda, I've reported this fellow here for persistent vandalization of my talkpage. Just thought I would let you know.--Smerus (talk) 21:47, 1 December 2020 (UTC)

I saw. Najgorszakomediaromantyczna, what in "go away" in "When someone reverts you on his or her talk, go away" did you not understand? --Gerda Arendt (talk) 21:51, 1 December 2020 (UTC)

DYK for Peter Lagger[edit]

Updated DYK query.svgOn 2 December 2020, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Peter Lagger, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that Swiss bass Peter Lagger performed in the world premieres of Louise Talma's Die Alkestiade at the Oper Frankfurt and of Penderecki's Magnificat at the Salzburg Festival? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Peter Lagger. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Peter Lagger), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

Cwmhiraeth (talk) 00:02, 2 December 2020 (UTC)

ITN recognition for Hella Brock[edit]

Ambox current red.svgOn 2 December 2020, In the news was updated with an item that involved the article Hella Brock, which you nominated and updated. If you know of another recently created or updated article suitable for inclusion in ITN, please suggest it on the candidates page. SpencerT•C 01:11, 2 December 2020 (UTC)

Your thoughts..[edit]

Dear Gerda I think I must retire from this place. I left a year and the petty hate is still here. Am I escaping the real world by leaving here? After all, all that we encounter in the 'real world' is here, but a little magnified. Have you ever considered leaving? Leibe Simon Adler (talk) 06:25, 2 December 2020 (UTC)
Simon, I considered leaving in 2012, when teh community (so I, no? - which drove me almost crazy, and I made a category that I don't belong to that community) banned my friend. I then considered that some would just want me go, and didn't want to do them the favour. I was never tempted again. I recommend (to everybody): just don't edit. Simon, thank you for wonderful things you told me here. I'd sadly add you to Die Fliege if you left us. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 08:17, 2 December 2020 (UTC)
I took a year-long break myself, back when (aside from occasional pop-ins when people e-mailed me directly about something). It can be refreshing. If you find you're not inspired to return after a year or whatever, that's fine. I used to play pool 4–6 nights a week. I don't now. Used to skateboard for hours almost every day, except in mid-winter (and even found some ways around that!). I don't now. Your time is your own, and your interests are free to realign!  — SMcCandlish ¢ 😼  21:54, 2 December 2020 (UTC)
No, I am not leaving. I was a bit upset when I foolishly contributed to the drama boards a couple of days ago. It just bugged me that some colleagues just can't let go of an idée fixe, that of a narrow, tortuous logic that can be tagged on (tenuously) to a condemnation of another's WP behaviour, which can be perverted to near- persecution. I mentioned WP:Apology being a lost art round here. It seemed to have sunk in to our more self-aware colleagues, but it just left me sour. If you cannot function here, how can you function in the 'real world' where things are infinitely worse. I have had my year out, and it affected my edit count badly! It was nice to see my page watchers had all stuck with me through that year out. It is the little things.. Anyway, thanks for your encouragement, means a lot. Simon. Simon Adler (talk) 03:14, 4 December 2020 (UTC)
You add to a good day, thank you Simon! I know the feeling (look around, where the long entries are on this page). However, today is a birthday of a friend, and Die güldne Sonne (The Golden Sun) is mentioned on the German Main page (more long entries for the English version). Please see if my #vision 2020 is for you, - nutshell: go away when a wall is too hard, "have a laugh, don't get too upset over this". --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:42, 4 December 2020 (UTC)
go away when a wall is too hard, "have a laugh, don't get too upset over this" – yes, yes, this, a thousand times this. It is an incredible and useful skill to sometimes just walk away and do something else. I wish I had it better but even so. I could not agree more ... and I think it is better for the encyclopaedia and probably for us as individuals to go on editing even if it's at a different level of commitment for a while. DBaK (talk) 16:13, 4 December 2020 (UTC)
... just remember that the quoted line is by someone much wiser than I am, - it's in my edit notice, did you see? - Now they play the Bossi Concerto. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 16:20, 4 December 2020 (UTC)

DYK for Hermann Wiedemann[edit]

Updated DYK query.svgOn 3 December 2020, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Hermann Wiedemann, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that Hermann Wiedemann, who sang the role of Beckmesser in Toscanini's recording of Die Meistersinger, appeared as Faninal in Der Rosenkavalier at the Vienna State Opera 196 times? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Hermann Wiedemann. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Hermann Wiedemann), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

Cwmhiraeth (talk) 00:02, 3 December 2020 (UTC)

DYK for Rudolf Gerlach-Rusnak[edit]

Updated DYK query.svgOn 3 December 2020, Did you know was updated with a fact from the article Rudolf Gerlach-Rusnak, which you recently created, substantially expanded, or brought to good article status. The fact was ... that Rudolf Gerlach-Rusnak was the stage name of a tenor from Ukraine, with the first name chosen for his favourite role in La bohème? The nomination discussion and review may be seen at Template:Did you know nominations/Rudolf Gerlach-Rusnak. You are welcome to check how many page hits the article got while on the front page (here's how, Rudolf Gerlach-Rusnak), and it may be added to the statistics page if the total is over 5,000. Finally, if you know of an interesting fact from another recently created article, then please feel free to suggest it on the Did you know talk page.

Cwmhiraeth (talk) 12:01, 3 December 2020 (UTC)

BWV 140[edit]

Lovely! Thanks for the heads up. Is the horn really just +sop the whole time?? I am listening now and trying not to make brass-playing-peasant-like remarks! (But it is utterly gorgeous, yes!) DBaK (talk) 16:04, 4 December 2020 (UTC)

Believe or not, we only did an organ version of the choral movements. I listened to three, Veldhoven, Lutz and Koopman, found first too slow, 2 a bit over-exited, 3 fine. No expert on assumptions on colla parte playing, and which instrument to use. Bach specified no horn, but Bach Digital has it. Best alto line ever, that Halleluja entry! - Just now I'm listening to birthday child, because he was honoured by 24 hours of him playing organ music on stream radio! organroxx.com - enjoy, a lot of funny music, right now Nigel Ogden's Scherzo for the White Rabbit. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 16:16, 4 December 2020 (UTC)
Wow, great stuff! Thank you. I was listening to the Suzuki one, with horn, and the next thing that happened was BWV 112 because that's next on vol. 52, and at that point my brain exploded with sheer delight ... it's really got horn parts! :) And gosh I will have to listen out for the White Rabbit. DBaK (talk) 00:44, 5 December 2020 (UTC)

ITN recognition for Jutta Lampe[edit]

Ambox current red.svgOn 5 December 2020, In the news was updated with an item that involved the article Jutta Lampe, which you nominated and updated. If you know of another recently created or updated article suitable for inclusion in ITN, please suggest it on the candidates page.  — Amakuru (talk) 10:26, 5 December 2020 (UTC)