User talk:Jimbo Wales

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Will there be an emergency? Nope, didn't happen[edit]

Maybe I'm just feeling very gloomy today, but it strikes me that President Trump will likely declare a national emergency tonight at 9pm New York Time. Such a declaration itself could become a different kind of national emergency. The stuff will really hit the fan in the press, in social media, and probably even on Wikipedia, and it will come from all sides. See e.g. ABC - Pence calls border 'bona fide emergency,' dodges questions about Trump falsehoods Pence is making the case ahead of Trump's address to the nation Tuesday night. and pre-refutations such as LA Times - There is no security crisis at the border

I'll just ask admins to consider ahead of time what they will do if it really does hit the fan on Wikipedia. Smallbones(smalltalk) 16:06, 8 January 2019 (UTC)

Smallbones I really hope he doesn't. However, the fact he's making federal workers work without pay is not a good indication **sigh**-- 5 albert square (talk) 17:17, 8 January 2019 (UTC)
  • Fact is, there has been one since Jan 20 2017. Hashtag ITMF. Guy (Help!) 18:24, 8 January 2019 (UTC)
I think it is pretty clear that what Trump will announce will be that he intends to exercise the powers of 10 U.S. Code § 2808 to begin construction of the wall that Congress is denying him funding for. This is probably not particularly alarming in the short run although, as Smallbones predicts, there will be a lot of noise about it. My concern personally is that this is a trial balloon for the exercise of much more alarming powers that the President may (or may not) theoretically have.
My view is that Congress has been lazy for a very long time in terms of giving increasing arbitrary authority to the Executive branch for all kinds of things. This has largely been kind of ok, mostly because whatever your views of various Presidents, none of them were actual lunatics. Depending on your view of our current President, you may find it alarming that he has these powers.
I'd like to add that I don't mind a little bit of personal chit-chat here about politics, I'd like to always seek to tie it back to Wikipedia. We have chosen a very tough job: NPOV. Dislike for the President, fear about things that are happening in the world, may make it emotionally harder to remain neutral, but remain neutral we must. I happen to personally think that given the decline in quality of the media across the board (there are still fantastic journalists out there, but overall the landscape isn't great) the best way for us to help the world heal is neutrality.--Jimbo Wales (talk) 21:12, 8 January 2019 (UTC)
I think the thing to watch here is the border patrol's claim to unusual police powers throughout a large internal region of the U.S. 100 miles from any border or coast. [1][2] CBP is widely known to enter buses and private property without a warrant, and the latter article makes some remarkable claims about powers it has demanded. The thing to bear in mind is that if Trump can funnel billions into a "border wall" that is not a literal wall and can allocate them however he wants, before long he could have "border patrol" agents combing through backyards and walled gardens looking for pot plants (even in Washington State ... especially there, I would think), and whatever other nasty surprise policies he comes up with. Wnt (talk) 21:31, 8 January 2019 (UTC)
[3]. --Guy Macon (talk) 22:25, 8 January 2019 (UTC)
Just watched the speech - it was about 10 minutes long, but nothing new in it. Nothing about a declaration of a national emergency. Smallbones(smalltalk) 02:26, 9 January 2019 (UTC)
Predictions are tricky. I mean, after all the dire warnings some made in favor of the North Carolina bathroom bill, I just finally read of a case of sexual assault in the ladies' room. In which the women are accused of assaulting the transwoman ... and who would have predicted that? Wnt (talk) 09:11, 9 January 2019 (UTC)
A fascinating example of Stephen Miller's writing style. The lack of empathy in the White House is pretty chilling. Guy (Help!) 11:39, 9 January 2019 (UTC)
They ask you, why do all the boys and girls go into separate toilets, and instead of being able to tell them that those toilets are not seperate because they are communal, which is clever, critical thinking for them, you are more likely to say to them oh, that's for privacy, though it is really against privacy, so there is the first and youngest encounter with stupid concerning communal toileting. The people who normalised communal toileting for the children of our culture cared about children in varying ways and paid less purchasing them than purchasing horses. There is no actual reason for communal toilet for any child over the maturity of possibly needing help with the actual physical actions like doing your button back up. It's just a tradition. The lagging reasons for communal toileting in schools are thus: Easier to help kindergarten children with clothing, Had some fun time with water in the changing rooms our selves, and It's never failed before/It's just a tradition. Life moves on. Communal toilets are cheap because everybody pays for them over time, or at least, for the lack of alternative! ~ R.T.G 01:08, 15 January 2019 (UTC)
The transfer of power to the executive is a natural response to polarisation. The near-impossibility of gaining 2/3 majority in a Senate where Wyoming gets the same number of votes as California means that bipartisanship is a difficult proposition, especially now that the right wing media has basically severed itself from the continuum of mainstream journalism. Guy (Help!) 01:12, 12 January 2019 (UTC)
Not to distract from the anger properly directed at "Tariff Man" (who is hurting a lot of Canadian workers), but the most important aspect, imo, is how many people have big debts and no savings (including me) which causes them(us) to live from paycheck to paycheck.
We just never seem to learn the most basic elements of capitalism. People my age had grandparents who witnessed first hand all the farms and homes that were repossessed by banks, or just as often by governments for unpaid property taxes. Even our parents would see any amount of mortgage on the homes we grew up in as a heavy threat, like a raised guillotine, to be paid off ASAP. My granddad came out of the depression better than most because after losing a couple of cotton crops to the boll weevil, he picked up himself, wife and 2 kids and moved to the city and learned how to sell life insurance from scratch. Also, being a Mason helped a lot, I imagine. But the point is, the only thing I remember him saying to me when we went to watch the train roll through town, was "Hold your money!"
I didn't even know what he meant and never asked. I, as a 5 year old, thought it meant literally "hold it in your hand". Much later, after he died, my mom told me it meant to save your money, and boy, she got it. She never paid 1 penny in interest. She always worked and had a deal with my more normal dad that he would pay the mortgage(which included interest) and she would pay for everything else. Many of her generation, at least a lot of them, who grew up in the great depression, would have had no trouble at all waiting a month or 2 for their paychecks. But the money lenders got most of us in my generation. I started getting credit cards in the mail when I was still in school with no income at all. Some people call it "Debt capitalism" and differentiate it from pure capitalism....I don't know enough about economics to speak on that, but maybe there is a difference.
This biggest selling song ever at the time it was sung here, says it all, and I especially get a kick outa the guys in tuxedos snapping their fingers, cause I imagine those are the guys who owned the "company store". Nocturnalnow (talk) 16:01, 11 January 2019 (UTC)

Tool for quickly copying media from Wikipedia/Wikimedia Commons to another wiki?[edit]

I wonder if anyone here knows of a tool for quickly copying media (images mainly) from Wikipedia/Wikimedia Commons to another (non-WMF) wiki, in such a way that automatically follows best practices for attribution?--Jimbo Wales (talk) 18:58, 13 January 2019 (UTC)

I took the liberty of asking at Wikipedia:Help desk#Tool for quickly copying media from Wikipedia/Wikimedia Commons to another wiki?. --Guy Macon (talk) 04:36, 14 January 2019 (UTC)
Thanks! I also found InstantCommons but haven't had time to test it yet.--Jimbo Wales (talk) 17:23, 15 January 2019 (UTC)

WP blocked in Venezuela[edit]

It appears we have gone dark there [4]. Anything we can/should do? Gråbergs Gråa Sång (talk) 11:12, 15 January 2019 (UTC)

Assuming that article is correct, it's currently a single company rather than a nationwide ban. The company is CANTV which has a million broadband subscribers, so it's not negligible, but unless there's evidence that other ISPs are also blocking access this could easily just be a glitch at their end. ‑ Iridescent 11:25, 15 January 2019 (UTC)
That article seems a bit biased - since it is breaking news this is at the moment no more than a "brief blockage", and as you say only by one company that we know of. Censorship of Wikipedia describes a lot of other "brief blockages". Certainly it would not be wise for any Bolivarian official to block all access to a site that is one of the great triumphs of socialist collaboration for the common good. Wnt (talk) 14:15, 15 January 2019 (UTC)
Not quite Turkey yet, then. Gråbergs Gråa Sång (talk) 14:41, 15 January 2019 (UTC)

Vandalism and provocations take place on Wikipedia[edit]

Hello Jimmy and other administrators! Vandalism and provocations (they wait 3 rollbacks from me) take place on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Vladimir_Putin&action=history (here easy understand)). I ask you take action against vandalism (restore my edit in the article, warnings for violators if will be need). Thank you! Yellow Man 1000 (talk) 16:26, 15 January 2019 (UTC)

Hi Yellow Man 1000. No matter whether your edit is correct or not (it's sourced, after all), the fact that it's true doesn't mean it's relevant. You need to Discuss with other editors when they revert your contributions, not edit war. Especially when your contributions are being undone by more than one editor, you need to step back. Administrators don't handle content disputes, they handle behavioural issues (like edit warring). Edit warring is disruptive. Never edit war, not even when you're right. Thanks! Bellezzasolo Discuss 16:31, 15 January 2019 (UTC)
  • It was simple vandalism (he understood this clearly, he did not click UNDO, and his description has no relation to info about music). And any clever man understand. I have right combat vandalism (not war of edits). Personal whim of vandal is not reason seek consent. If not so, I have right remove any new information which I do not like! You not will be glad, if I will rollback you simply so. I ask help here. Not protection for vandals which act against Wikipedia and me. Jimmy Wales, help me! Yellow Man 1000 (talk) 17:07, 15 January 2019 (UTC)

URGENT: Please sign new Wikimedia confidentiality agreement for nonpublic information now[edit]

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The redlinks are supposed to point to meta:Confidentiality agreement for nonpublic information/How to sign I believe, seeing as the message was composed on Meta. Jo-Jo Eumerus (talk, contributions) 17:47, 16 January 2019 (UTC)