User talk:Nillurcheier

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Welcome![edit]

Hello, Nillurcheier, and welcome to Wikipedia! Thank you for your contributions, especially what you did for Catholic Church by country. I hope you like the place and decide to stay. Here are some pages that you might find helpful:

Please remember to sign your messages on talk pages by typing four tildes (~~~~); this will automatically insert your username and the date. If you need help, check out Wikipedia:Questions, ask me on my talk page, or ask your question on this page and then place {{help me}} before the question. Again, welcome! Chris Troutman (talk) 16:45, 20 June 2013 (UTC)

Religion in Germany[edit]

Hi, is this edit a mistake? JimRenge (talk) 18:56, 11 November 2015 (UTC)

Talk:List of German supercentenarians[edit]

I have explained my removals at Talk:List of German supercentenarians. Please discuss it there. -- Ricky81682 (talk) 08:52, 23 November 2015 (UTC)

ArbCom elections are now open![edit]

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Jeppiz (talk) 14:56, 13 May 2016 (UTC)
Dear Jeppiz: I did not add the Eurobarometer data, I only reverted your deletion. Eurobarometer data are used for years as sources in other pages as well. What should be wrong with them. BR Ulrich --Nillurcheier (talk) 15:13, 13 May 2016 (UTC)
If you reinstate an edit, you take responsibility for it. That report is a report on attitudes to biotechnology, yet you use it to claim it says how many Muslims there are in different countries. The authors of the report never once make that claim. It's entirely your synthesis of it, found nowhere in the actual source. All the report says is how many in their sample belong to different religions, nothing else. Jeppiz (talk) 15:16, 13 May 2016 (UTC)

Disambiguation link notification for May 30[edit]

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Reference errors on 31 May[edit]

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List of European cities by elevation
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June 2016[edit]

Information icon Hello, I'm Aristophanes68. I noticed that you recently removed some content from Christianity without adequately explaining why. In the future, it would be helpful to others if you described your changes to Wikipedia with an accurate edit summary. If this was a mistake, don't worry; the removed content has been restored. If you would like to experiment, please use the sandbox. If you think I made a mistake, or if you have any questions, you can leave me a message on my talk page. Thanks. Aristophanes68 (talk) 17:58, 24 June 2016 (UTC)

Daniele Ganser[edit]

I see that you reverted my edit on Daniele Ganser. The "conspiracy theory" text was added by User:Capitalismojo here in September 2014. It was changed to "probably" by an IP here last week. Since you reverted it, what does "are all actually probably" mean? It doesn't make any sense to me. -Niceguyedc Go Huskies! 08:48, 28 June 2016 (UTC)

Regarding your changes made[edit]

Hi Nillurcheier, could you perhaps explain these edits? As far as I can see, this reference which you cited, doesn't support any of the changes of the numbers (not the percentages) you made. If I looked wrong myself, then please let me know as well, of course. :-) Bests - LouisAragon (talk) 19:51, 2 July 2016 (UTC)

Hi LouisAragon, I double-checked and sourced all my changes carefully. All of them are well sourced. If you know other data, feel free to add them. --Nillurcheier (talk) 11:34, 4 July 2016 (UTC)

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Undid revision Religion in Peru and Panama[edit]

Hello, I have noticed that you have undid my edings in the articles of Religion in Panama [1] and Peru [2]. I dont't agree with you that your argument about undoing the eding is purley just "poor, outdated and indirect source". Because A) World Factbook is not poor source. B) It is very on date indeed. If you want to argue with the sourch coming from World Factbook I perphere also argue about other sourches indeed. Thanks, --Mannerheimo (talk) 15:54, 10 August 2016 (UTC)

Hi Mannerheimo thanks for your question. In general CIA World Factbook is an acceptable source. However they don't do original research but collect carefully data from all over the world. Hence, if we have and know primary sources, they should always be preferred. Some data is on date, religious data however are quite often outdated. E.g. the religious composition for Germany in the Factbook says 34% Catholic and 34% protestants. Well this is a figure that was true in 1995. today it's 29% and 28%. I hope, we can agree on the preference or primary sources such as censuses or surveys (e.g. by PEW). BR Ulrich --Nillurcheier (talk) 13:47, 11 August 2016 (UTC)

European migrant crisis[edit]

Claiming sourced statements are "wrong claims" just isn't enough. I've reinstated the statements which are backed up by a reliable source (Der Spiegel). If you disagree, please express your objections on the talk-page. Thank you. Kleuske (talk) 20:14, 2 October 2016 (UTC)

Hi Kleuske: I have removed the wrong claims, which are btw not backed by the article, ok? --Nillurcheier (talk) 07:33, 4 October 2016 (UTC)

Protestantism in Spain[edit]

Hi, Nillurcheier! I'm the guy who deleted the sentence about the 1,200,000 Protestants in Spain in Religion in Spain. I'm a Spaniard living in Spain and I don't have anything against Protestants (pretty much agnostic, myself) but trust me, there's absolutely no way over 2.5% of the population is Protestant even accounting for immigration and the Jehova's Witnesses (if they're protestants...) Protestant sites tend to inflate the numbers by obvious reasons but it's simply not realistic. That's why I've added a "better source needed" tag (as in an independent source...) Best regards, --MaeseLeon (talk) 05:08, 6 November 2016 (UTC)

Hi @MaeseLeon:, I agree with you that the numbers seem to be quite high. Could you provide more realistic data with a reliable source? ?que dice la pagina espa~nola? saludos Ulrich --Nillurcheier (talk) 13:17, 6 November 2016 (UTC)
¡Hola, Ulrich! :) Unfortunately I can't, and I have tried hard to in the past because I'm quite interested in the history and sociology of religion. Here in Spain, there is no obligation or motivation to declare your religion in any official document or anything like that (actually it isn't asked anywhere), so we don't have "official data." However, the best available info about the religious composition of Spanish society is provided by the continuous series of the Centro de Investigaciones Sociológicas, which elaborates monthly statistics about a number of issues through (voluntary) polls, including religion, since 1979. Last published one was done on july 2016. Unfortunately they don't break down minoritary religions and all of them are included in the "others" category, but if you check question 56 in page 30, you'll see that the entire "others" category (including Protestantism but also Islam, New-Age movements, etc) sums up only 2.2% of the population. This is coherent with the general trends of all previous C.I.S. studies and studies from private agencies (like Pew and Gallup) that I've seen too. So I'd say that a number around 2-2.5% for all the "others" together is quite realistic.
There are 2 important caveats to consider here. First, the C.I.S. only asks Spaniards (native or naturalized), so non-naturalized residents are not included in their studies. Second, the number of Catholics (67.8%) are mostly "self-identified Catholics", "identity Catholics" or the like, meaning something like "well... my family used to be Catholic, I was baptized in the Catholic Church, got the First Communion, maybe I was married in a Catholic Church, I sort of believe in 'something' more or less along Christian lines, so I guess I'm Catholic." In reality, a majority of modern Spaniards are basically secular and they don't believe in most tenets of Catholicism, they don't follow their teachings, they behave like us "fully secular" Spaniards and they rarely attend Mass (as you can see in question 56a), often just to go with the family to baptisms, first communions, marriages and funerals and that's all. There's even a joke about kids "taking their First and Last Communion," meaning people do it for the family party and the presents and such things, not out of religious faith, and they won't attend Mass again. Since 2009 the number of civil (non-religious) marriages overpassed the number of religious marriages, following a 20-year-old trend, and they are on the rise (not to mention the huge number of couples just living together.) Quite a few people are no longer baptizing their children either, not even as a social/family thing. Civil "coming of age parties" instead of First Communions, if still minoritary, are on the rise. Secularization has been really strong in Spain in recent decades, shockingly fast for such a deep phenomenon, transforming this old "bulkwark of Catholicism" into just another highly secularized modern Western European country. So I'd say the number of "real" Catholics is very inflated too because of these "I guess I'm Catholic but..." answers. This is especially true among the younger generations, at least those who don't directly declare themselves irreligious or Atheists. Analyzing the C.I.S. studies, I'd say that around 25% of Spaniards or even less are "sort-of-true" Catholics nowadays.
As for Protestants: native non-Gypsy Spanish Protestants are exceedingly rare ---I think I've met 4 or 5 in my entire life. A number of Gypsies (who have been perfectly Spanish for centuries) are followers of the so-called Church of Philadelphia, but I wouldn't say they're a majority. As an example, not far from where I live there is a Gypsy-majority neighborhood with over 7,000 residents, I've seen their church, and it's a really little place where you and I'd be pressed hard to pack 100 people inside. Most of those I know are as secularized as us non-Gypsy Spaniards. Jehova's Witnesses (are they Protestants...?) experienced a boost after the end of Francoism, but they've been pretty much stagnated in the last decades and they're around 112,000 according to their own recent data. And... that's pretty much all among native and naturalized Spaniards. Protestants, Muslims and other "others" are mostly non-naturalized immigrants/residents. I guess it could be said "OK, maybe including all those people they sum up a bit above 1 million Protestants", but I still don't see it. Nowadays there isn't religious persecution in Spain at all (well, maybe except for Racists against Muslims...) and if 2.5% of the general population including immigrants were Protestants, I think they would be far more visible than they are. They're practically "invisible." If I'm able to find better info, I'll sure add it to the article and tell you here. :)
Have a happy week! --MaeseLeon (talk) 08:24, 7 November 2016 (UTC) Updated with additional info: --MaeseLeon (talk) 09:20, 7 November 2016 (UTC)
Hi @MaeseLeon:, thanks for your long and detailed explanation. I follow the CIS data series and rate it the best available source. In addition, there is the PEW, which reports 1% Protestants and 2% Orthodox Christians. As you already supposed, the major difficulty might be the immigrants, who are not fully represented in the CIS-surveys. The page https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inmigraci%C3%B3n_en_Espa%C3%B1a reports 4.7 million foreign residents in Spain for 2015.
Looking at the list, I see (thousands): 750 Rumanos, 142 Bulgaros, 91 Ucranianos, 68 Russians which might sum up to 1.1 mio from eastern Europe, being 80-90% Orthodox, which explains the 2% pretty well. There are also 283 Britanicos (50%prot),131 Alemanes (30%prot), 73 Brasil (25%prot), 43 Nigeria (35%prot), summing up to approx. 220.000 foreign protestants. Adding another 200.000 (?) "native" Spanish Protestants, 1% is a rather plausible result. BR Ulrich --Nillurcheier (talk) 08:58, 8 November 2016 (UTC)
You're very welcome, Ulrich. :) As you can see, this is certainly an interest of me! :) I guess we could add the corresponding percentages of other Latin American immigrants in es:Inmigración en España too, but still I wouldn't expect a huge increase of the number. Around 1% Protestants in the total population sounds like a quite reasonable number to me too, quite dispersed in small churches (usually divided by country of origin) which are only present in cities or (very) large towns.
I wouldn't even dare to talk about prevailing denominations; I don't think there's enough "critical mass" for that. Possibly Pentecostal/Evangelical denominations and that Gypsy Church are more extended, but "prevailing" would be too much of a word in my opinion. FEREDE doesn't provide a breakdown either, and there are super-tiny groups which are not members of FEREDE. FEREDE says they serve around 400,000 Spanish protestants (150,000 of them Gypsies), not specifying if native or naturalized, and that "there must be" around 1,200,000 Protestants in Spain including the non-FEREDE churches. But as said, their numbers are notoriously suspicious and they don't provide any public source to support them. And I tend to think that those little and scarce non-FEREDE churches (it's difficult to find one) can't possibly sum up 800,000 Protestants plus their self-reported 400,000.
I would say that "all religions lie" here, because there are perks for the "biggest religions", like easier access to subsidies for their activities and chartered schools, salaries for (your) religion teachers in public schools and things like that. In general terms, "the larger the better", so everybody starting with the Catholic Church try to inflate their numbers as much as possible. For a time, the Catholic Church insisted that every Catholic-baptized Spaniard was a Catholic ---meaning almost all of us back then, even if you were a publicly known Atheist. Not baptizing your children in Francoist Spain was a bad idea (they wouldn't shoot you for that after 1945 or so but you should expect trouble for you and especially the kid ---the "fe de bautismo" or baptismal registry was an often required document and not having it meant all kinds of more-or-less subtle but very real troubles.) Even for some time after the dictator died and the laws changed it was seriously frown upon. So almost all of us born before 1980 or so were counted as Catholics. Actually it's still difficult to formally apostatize nowadays in order to "be erased" of their registries ---they just add a handwritten note in your baptismal register saying that you have apostatized with no further consequences, in case you take all the time needed to go through the process.
Rarely anyone formally apostatize because it's too much time and effort for such a little "victory", so the Catholic Church can still say they're "zillions" (after all, the C.I.S., even being a Government entity, just does sociological studies; as I told you, there's no "official religion record.") Nonbelievers are just not baptizing their children anymore. Only in the last years the Spanish Catholic Church has started to admit that they may not be so many "zillions" after all... because you only need to visit Spain staying with average Spaniards for a couple weeks to realize that's totally unreal, not to mention if you're a Spaniard living here. Over 50% of priests should have retired long ago, but the poor old guys are still working because all the Spanish seminaries together aren't able to consecrate 200 new priests a year ---it's not a job that young people want even with our high unemployment and all. We're talking about a country that in past times had over 100,000 priests with much less population ---now they're slightly above 15,000 and shrinking fast out of biological reasons. Even the officially religious ceremonies like baptisms or marriages and the First Communion, or traditional festivities like the Semana Santa and similar, are just socially-recognized parties or kind-of-cathartic experiences for most people.
I'm not saying that there are zero "true Catholics" in Spain nowadays, sure there are quite a few, but as I told you I doubt they're even 25%, much less among the younger generations. I have 2 daughters (a young teenager and an almost-teenager... terrifying, yesss!!! :D ) and if you asked me, I wouldn't be able to name any of their school mates, friends and acquaintances in their age range who could be (more or less) described as a "true Catholic." Some of them still attend Mass with their families on Sundays, but it's pretty obvious most of them will stop doing it as soon as they get a bit older. I guess that, as an irreligious person, I could say I'm perfectly OK with what for me is a "triumph of reason", but I'll also admit that as I told you before, the change has been so shockingly fast and deep that it's somehow scary ---don't ask me why, I guess I should be happy because "my team is winning big time", but I find something uncanny in such a transformation of an entire society, so quick. Possibly the Francoism keep a much older trend artificially repressed (there were quite a few instances of enlightened liberalism and even violent anti-clericalism in the History of Spain), and when that yoke was gone, we as a society went ahead full-steam. Going from being "the spiritual reserve of the West" to becoming the third country in the world fully legalizing gay marriage with barely a protest, a median age for first (obviously unmarried) sex at 15 y.o. (13 or 14 not being unusual at all) with pretty much the acceptance of your family, and generally being a bunch of irreligious or softly-religious "hardcore social liberals" is quite a change, huh...?
Protestants and the Orthodox tend to do something very much like the Catholic Church: counting every "theoretical" follower as one of them. Do we have 750,000 Romanians in Spain and 81% of Romanians self-identify as Orthodox Christians? OK, count 607,500 Orthodox Christians more! (Even if the only church that the 607,500th visited in the last decade was the Cathedral of Burgos, just out of historical interest.) Pretty much the same with Protestants: it feels like they are counting every possible Protestant as an actual Protestant. The Muslims also play the game. I personally know not a few people from Muslim countries who don't step into a mosque and who love Spanish wine and ham as much as me, and they've told me that the Islamic Community regards them as Muslims. It's like a race among all of them and the Catholic Church to show who is more "sociologically relevant" to make the politicians think about them... but the most "sociologically relevant religion" in Spain is a "silent majority" of vague "believers-in-something-or-nothing-at-all" who just live our lives without caring about those fights at all. Are you going to baptize your new baby? Cool, invite me to the party! Aren't you? Cool, let's throw that party to welcome the little one anyway! :D
The smarter politicians noticed it long ago and the not-so-smart ones are getting it too: our (small) "religious right" has been fuming for years because the major right-wing party, when in Government, does nothing about abortion or any other liberal laws introduced when the left is governing, and sometimes they even take them further to show how modern and socially-conscious they are. This "religious right" is currently not represented in any Spanish party with a seat in Parliament (or even the possibility to get one), and hasn't been for around 2 decades. Even highly conservative, admittedly rightist and Catholic people who attend Mass every Sunday vote Popular Party ---which barely touches a comma of the progressive social laws introduced by the left and even approve new ones (like the post-coital pill, or extensions of divorce rights) because that's what "we the people" seem to want, no matter what some people say. Every party promising a return to more conservative values has miserably failed since the first democratic elections in 1977. The last one trying it was VOX and this one was not just a fringe far-right thing: they got some decent financing and they had a couple Catholic leaders behind (including a bishop), some backing from the "alt-right" (and far-right...), their leading candidate was a former well-known leader of the Popular Party's most rightist sector... they had possibilities. For a while, it sounded like they could do something with the most rightist and Conservative disenchanted Popular Party's voters. Well, their best result was 250,000 votes (1.57%) in the 2014 European Election, far, far away from a seat in the European Parliament. More recently, they're getting 50,000-60,000 votes in the latest general elections, far less than the single-issue anti-bullfighting, animal-rights party PACMA (and no seats anywhere, of course.) There are 4-5 times more Spaniards voting to ban bullfighting than voting to ban abortion. Who could have thought that 30 years ago...?
Heck, I've written too much. Sorry for that. Hope that you find it interesting at least!!!! ;) --MaeseLeon (talk) 05:39, 9 November 2016 (UTC)

West Germany, then Germany[edit]

Howdy. The country was known as West Germany from 1949 to 1990, then after reunification, Germany. GoodDay (talk) 17:23, 18 November 2016 (UTC)

Not really . In an informal conversation you may use these terms, but officially the FRG persists as a nation since 1949 whereas the GDR ceased to exist in 1990 when their states (Länder) decided to join the FRG (according to the rules described in the Grundgesetz). BR Ulrich --Nillurcheier (talk) 15:32, 19 November 2016 (UTC)
Better for readers,@GoodDay: to use West Germany. GoodDay (talk) 15:35, 19 November 2016 (UTC)
@GoodDay:, seriously? Could we agree on a formulation like "Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany)"? Otherwise we have to stick to the official names --Nillurcheier (talk) 15:41, 19 November 2016 (UTC)
Having (West Germany) & (East Germany) in the infoboxes would help immensely. GoodDay (talk) 15:43, 19 November 2016 (UTC)

ArbCom Elections 2016: Voting now open![edit]

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Jobas[edit]

Someone should stop this user from wreacking havoc in articles about religion demographics by changing recent reliable data with Pew-Templeton's and other Christian agencies's data to inflate the number of Christians. Recently, many people have raised concerns about the reliability of data contained in "Christianity by country", in the talk page, but Jobas has removed the tag again. It has become impossible to make new edits to articles about religion demographics as he appears to patrol daily most of them.--87.8.85.26 (talk) 20:31, 28 November 2016 (UTC)

Wikiproject![edit]

Hello, Nillurcheier! I saw you recently edited a page related to the Green party and green politics. There is a new WikiProject that has been formed - WikiProject Green Politics and I thought this might be something you'd be interested in joining! So please head on over to the project page and take a look! Thanks for your time. Me-123567-Me (talk) 17:28, 17 February 2017 (UTC)

March 2017[edit]

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Environmental policy of the European Union[edit]

Hi,

I noticed that the link to Environmental racism in Europe was reverted, under the justification that there is "no connection." I am writing to explain my reasoning for providing the link. A significant portion of the Environmental racism in Europe article is devoted to specific environmental policies and laws within the European union, and the often-complex relationship between environmental policies and how certain groups of people experience environmental issues in Europe. I would like to respectfully ask you to please re-review the article I have linked to, and to please re-consider what I feel was a constructive, specific, and relevant edit.

Thanks, Sturgeontransformer (talk) 23:58, 18 August 2017 (UTC)

Dear @Sturgeontransformer:, sorry for that, I did not intent to revert your edit. it was a kind of collateral demage of the other reverts. Regarding your "Environmental racism" activities I have neutral position. BR Ulrich --Nillurcheier (talk) 09:15, 19 August 2017 (UTC)
Hi @Nillurcheier:, thank you for the clarification, and no worries! I will re-post the link. Sturgeontransformer (talk) 17:13, 19 August 2017 (UTC)

Islam by country[edit]

Hi, Nillurcheier! I have edited the article Islam by country twice, and both times you have reverted my changes, deeming them vandalism. However, all I was doing was fixing a few grammatical errors (a comma splice and the incorrect capitalization of "Within"). Why do you feel these edits are improper? B14709 (talk) 18:44, 24 August 2017 (UTC)

(by talk page stalker) @B14709: You must be confused. Take a look at your edit. Chris Troutman (talk) 18:47, 24 August 2017 (UTC)
@Chris troutman: Oh dear! It seems a chrome extension of mine has led to more changes in the article than I intended. I'm very sorry about this, and I apologize for any misunderstandings. B14709 (talk) 18:52, 24 August 2017 (UTC)
I did that myself once. Chris Troutman (talk) 18:54, 24 August 2017 (UTC)
@B14709: Sorry for having been rude in my wording, however there was a reoccuring change of the word "god" without any explanation. I am glad that the issue has been solved, BR Ulrich --Nillurcheier (talk) 20:21, 24 August 2017 (UTC)

9/11 Conspiracy theories[edit]

The long term discussions as evidenced in the talk page archives that I have been a part of for 12 years was that a section dedicated to conspiracy theories was not to be added to the 9/11 attacks article. Maybe you need to get more familiar with what those discussion were so you know what the consensus is...or better yet, start your own discussion before you revert others.--MONGO 12:52, 10 September 2017 (UTC) @MONGO: thanks for this info, I got your point, will wait for further discussion, BR Ulrich --Nillurcheier (talk) 16:59, 10 September 2017 (UTC)

Religion in Germany, Fowid[edit]

Hello there Nillurcheier! I saw your edit on the Fowid chart and wanted to discuss. I think that two sources on the same pie chart is confusing. Also, the data from Fowid itself is also based on Remid so this makes it even more confusing. A better way to have many sources would be to use tables the German article uses or a new pie chart. Vargmali (talk) 06:21, 14 September 2017 (UTC)

Willy Brandt[edit]

Dear user Nillurcheier

You are weclome to shorten the contribition. Here it is in Wiki Format. The matter is a serious one indeed, and it deserves a mention in the Brandt article

Willy Brandt and the Yom Kippur War[edit]

The Director of the Documentation Council of the State Archives of Israel, Hagai Tsoref, and Michael Wolffsohn historian at the German Army University Munich maintained in an article, first published in the German Daily Die Welt that Chancellor Willy Brandt, highly praised as a peace builder, could have prevented the Yom Kippur War of October 1973, but he didn’t. [1]

The authors say that Egypt and Syria, almost exactly forty years ago, had almost extinguished Israel's existence by their surprise attack on the highest Jewish holiday. [2]

Israel's then Prime Minister, Golda Meir according to this analysis, based on hitherto unpublished and now released documents in the United States, Germany and Israel, in the summer of 1973 wanted peace with Egypt and hand back virtually all of the territories conquered on the Sinai Peninsula in the June 1967 war. [3]


Because she no longer trusted in the mediation of the great powers, Social Democrat Golda Meir asked the German Social Democrat Willy Brandt for advice and action during his visit to Israel in June 1973. It should have helped to set the peace process in motion. But Willy Brandt, the argument says, dismally failed to help. For Brandt, Israel was a disturbing factor. [4]

Firstly, because he had no great interest in close contacts with Israel. This corresponded (and corresponds in the opinion of the authors until today) to the majority opinion of the SPD in Germany.

Brandt was not prepared to mediate in the Middle East. [5]

He handed over the initiative of Golda Meir to the chief executive to the German Foreign Office (AA), which was not Israeli friendly and favored the Arab world.

Its head, FDP chairman Walter Scheel, had, since 1966, reoriented his party from the right to the left, but maintained its Israeli-critical attitude.

German foreign policy, the analysis maintains, miserably failed the mediation, while Yugoslav President Tito correctly warned Brandt in summer 1973: “It is five minutes before twelve. The Arabs are preparing for a total war ... They are ready to destroy Israel, and they have the means to do so" Tito told the Chancellor. [6]

Summing up their assessment, the analysis comes to the conclusion that beyond the question of guilt for not having prevented the Yom Kippur War, the Chancellor made a crass mistake: he depreciated Jerusalem's unalloyed initiative, leaving it to the routine of professional diplomats. More importantly, unlike Golda Meir, he had included the great powers. Peace Chancellor Brandt did not prevent the Middle East war in 1973. He could have done it. [7]

Even worse, Michael Wolfssohn revealed in another article based on recently revealed documents, that Brandt, after the outbreak of the Yom Kippur War, by not allowing United States Air Force transport planes, rushing in the urgently needed military supplies for Israel, to fly over Germany or to land at U.S. airbases in Germany for the urgently needed refueling. [8] Eventually, not Willy Brandt, but the government of Marcelo Caetano in Portugal, still under the Estado Novo regime, saved the State of Israel in its finest hour, by granting the United States airlift of supplies to Israel via the Azores. [9] In the operation, the biggest of its kind ever in military history, the Military Airlift Command of the U.S. Air Force shipped 22,325 tons of tanks, artillery, ammunition, and supplies in C-141 Starlifter andC-5 Galaxy transport aircraft between October 14 and November 14, 1973 to Israel. [10] John de Norrona (talk) 15:56, 6 October 2017 (UTC)

Religion in Austria, survey data[edit]

Hi, I noticed that you removed the survey data I added in the article yesterday [3] but I think that the article needs also survey data. Other countries' article that have religious institution data as first source, like the Sweden's one, are implemented with additional surveys.--FrankCesco26 (talk) 07:36, 15 October 2017 (UTC)

References

The case of "Religion in Denmark" is even more emblematic of the unreliability of those small surveys[edit]

Hello Ulrich. Please consider what I have written here about the unreliability of those small surveys. If we keep adding such kind of survey data the articles will soon turn into unreadable lists of decontextualised useless data. The case of Religion in Denmark is even more emblematic of their unreliability; the recent change replaced Eurobarometer 2012 data which shew Lutherans at 64% with more recent data which show Lutherans at 79%, a drastic change that is not worthy of representation since it is just a pointer to an equally drastic difference in methodology between the two poor-quality small surveys. In my opinion, we should establish a policy to prevent that any of those poor-quality data are inserted into Wikipedia articles.--Wddan (talk) 13:33, 16 October 2017 (UTC)

So you should remove poor-sourced surveys like the Ipsos Global Trends one? A difference in the phrasing of the question can change the the results. Please explain why do you think that these sources are unrealiable. Both Eurobarometer and International Social Survey Programme are very reliable sources coming from excellent research centers, the results have been perfectly weighted. The results of both of them are published in the GESIS – Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences's website, largest German infrastructure institute for the social sciences and one of the most important social science institutes of Europe.--FrankCesco26 (talk) 15:03, 16 October 2017 (UTC)

ArbCom 2017 election voter message[edit]

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Thank you for correcting my mistake. I missed that source mentions 5% of the population also[edit]

https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Islam_by_country&type=revision&diff=817841331&oldid=817839954 174.95.4.187 (talk) 22:18, 30 December 2017 (UTC)

Horst-Wessel-Lied[edit]

Unless you want to brought up on the noticeboards for admninistrator sanctioning, I would suggest that you do not replace English-langauge spelling with German-language spelling again. This is English-language Wikipedia, and the "ß" is nota feature of the English language. If you want to use that, I would suggest you go and edit German Wikipedia. Beyond My Ken (talk) 10:30, 6 January 2018 (UTC)

@Beyond My Ken:, first I prefer a more polite style of conversation, we are not debating the most important conflict of the world and are not in an edit war. Be so kind and link the appropriate Wikipedia guideline that has a rule for this issue. Be also so kind and explain, why many last names in English Wikipedia are spelled according to German rules (Göring, Schröder etc.). Next, please explain why there are dozens of "Straße" in the English Wikipedia like Hohe Straße, Ingolstädter Straße and many more. Finally let's continue this discussion on the article's talk page. I will copy it. BR Ulrich --Nillurcheier (talk) 16:07, 6 January 2018 (UTC)

WP:CANVASS[edit]

Please read the above policy. Pointers to discussions are supposed to be neutral, on the order of "There is a discussion at XXXX which you may be interested in..." By laying out your opinion about the discussion in the pointer you placed at Karl-Marx-Allee, you violated this policy, quite inadvertantly I'm sure. Please do not do so again. Beyond My Ken (talk) 20:40, 29 January 2018 (UTC)

Dowsing History deletes[edit]

On 1st Feb you deleted two recent inserts to the History section to the Dowsing page with the description "not helpful". Can you say how you reached this conclusion? Both inserts were completely referenced and both were previously missing from that section. One documented the first water dowse, the other presented scholarship about the source of the term "dowsing", where previously the page said "unknown origin". Would you consider undoing this change? Anweald (talk) 10:20, 3 February 2018 (UTC)

@Anweald: Anweald thanks for this hint. I tried to revert the last edit (changing the word dowsing), but Nottnott was faster so I got confused. However I do not clearly understand, why some cited and reasonable formulated paragraphs were deleted. I reverted my deletion and am looking forward to a constructive discussion. --Nillurcheier (talk) 17:29, 3 February 2018 (UTC)
Thanks, I get confused by wikipedia still. I successfully reverted your last edit. Maybe best to look through to see what's there now if you still want to change it, but I think there was some vandalism that Nottnott fixed/ Anweald (talk) 19:00, 3 February 2018 (UTC)