User talk:Nohat: Difference between revisions

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(apparently incorrect subtitles Polish, Danish)
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You got the text wrong on Danish and Polish (at least as per the old logos), see above.[[User:Eloquence|—Eloquence]] 03:08, Oct 14, 2003 (UTC)
 
You got the text wrong on Danish and Polish (at least as per the old logos), see above.[[User:Eloquence|—Eloquence]] 03:08, Oct 14, 2003 (UTC)
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Hi, I have copied this from talk about your logo on Meta in case you haven't noticed it:
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Could you use normal cyrillic I ( И ) instead of short I? It is also unique for Cyrillic but, unlike short I, present in Serbian and Macedonian as well. Or, if you're afraid that some people will think it is N upside down, you could use Zhe ( Ж ); I think it is more often used as a sample Cyrillic letter, it is symetric, and (unlike I) doesn't originate from Greek alphabet (so, it is more Cyrillic, in a way). [[User:Nikola Smolenski|Nikola Smolenski]] 11:44, 12 Oct 2003 (UTC)

Revision as of 13:23, 14 October 2003

Re: Talk:List of words of disputed pronunciation

I don't think I know enough to detect many other problems. I'd just assumed app-ricot was only current in the US (North America?) and so I looked a bit deeper. Just seemed odd on a page that elsewhere took pains to distinguish between British, Australian and American usage. On TV here it's popular to advertise some products (shampoo, junk food, kids' toys, action movies) with an American voice-over and I particularly recall one for app-ricat shampoo.

Of course, one dificulty with vowel sounds is that nobody in the UK actually speaks RP anyway. Along with everyone north of Warwick, I maintain that "dance" and "romance" rhyme, but that's not how the dictionaries have it - they have "dance" with a long a.

On "harass", early stress - HArass - is the only variant in my UK dictionaries and my aged parents' heads. Also, dictionary.cambridge.org gives just that version in "[UK] Advanced learners", but both versions in "American English". But see my additions to Frank Spencer.

172.190.97.145 00:03, 26 Sep 2003 (UTC)

That was me by the way.

About "Washington" - it doesn't look like its a pronunciation difference to me, just one of accent. Everyone agrees the first sylable is the same as "wash", but they say "wash" differently. Perhaps a problem with the phonetic descriptions is that they're so exact they include the accent as well as the general pronunciation. Maybe it would be more neutral to say e.g. the debate is whether "apricot" shares its first sylable with "ape" or "application".

Andy G 21:38, 26 Sep 2003 (UTC)

Well you do do good work. People call me an asshole, but I say what I think. I'm just glad to see talented people at work. I'll be uploading some color-variants tonight. Maybe they will spark some more refinement and ideas. PS- speaking of professionalism-- I'd never used the color overlays before-- took some getting used to. But I see now that raster-layer versions of that file would have been just about enormous. (roughly) ;) -戴&#30505sv 07:07, 29 Sep 2003 (UTC)

Required logo updates

Could you upload logo variants with the subtitles

  • L'encyclopédie Libre (French
  • Den Fria Encyklopedin (Swedish)
  • De vrije encyclopedie (Dutch)
  • Den frie encyklopædi (Dansk)
  • Wolna encyklopedia (Polish)
  • A szabad lexikon (Hungarian)
  • La Libera Enciklopedio (Esperanto, also uses the name "Vikipedio" instead of Wikipedia" for some reason)
  • La Enciclopedia Libre (Spanish)

We'll probably need the subtitle in all languages, but these are the most important ones. I've experimented with using m:Wikipedia raster name, but this font doesn't really look nice in combination with the logo, and puzzling it together would require changes to the code; I would prefer it to have an individual file for each language.—Eloquence 21:41, Oct 13, 2003 (UTC)


Waou, thank Nohat. For the logo

I immediately go make a putch on the fr :-) Anthère 01:29, 14 Oct 2003 (UTC)

You got the text wrong on Danish and Polish (at least as per the old logos), see above.—Eloquence 03:08, Oct 14, 2003 (UTC)


Hi, I have copied this from talk about your logo on Meta in case you haven't noticed it:

Could you use normal cyrillic I ( И ) instead of short I? It is also unique for Cyrillic but, unlike short I, present in Serbian and Macedonian as well. Or, if you're afraid that some people will think it is N upside down, you could use Zhe ( Ж ); I think it is more often used as a sample Cyrillic letter, it is symetric, and (unlike I) doesn't originate from Greek alphabet (so, it is more Cyrillic, in a way). Nikola Smolenski 11:44, 12 Oct 2003 (UTC)