User talk:Opus33

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This is the page for messages directed to me. Kindly place your message at the bottom, and I'll try to reply soon. --Opus33

Archives[edit]

Mozart[edit]

Hi, can you help me out on the Mozart article with this MackyBeth person? I don't want to edit war with her, but she keeps reverting to her POV (latest example), and I'm at 2RR already. Thanks, DoctorJoeE review transgressions/talk to me! 15:38, 25 April 2014 (UTC)

Thanks for the heads-up! I've plunged in. Opus33 (talk) 15:54, 25 April 2014 (UTC)
And, of course, she immediately reverted you -- and is getting increasingly arrogant on the talk page. I realize this is basically a content dispute, but we may need administrative help anyway, because she's not budging. DoctorJoeE review transgressions/talk to me! 16:34, 25 April 2014 (UTC)
Neither are the two of you budging, so who is at fault here?MackyBeth (talk) 16:59, 25 April 2014 (UTC)

May 2014[edit]

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  • *Fitzgerald, Faith T., Neal Zaslaw, and Philip A. Mackowiak (2001. Noble heart. ''American Journal of Medicine'' 110:633-640.

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(done). Opus33 (talk) 15:32, 19 June 2014 (UTC)

Haydn's name[edit]

Hi Opus33. I've been trying to tidy up the citations in Haydn's Name. I'm a little stumped with the Ngrams, and I've taken the liberty of editing your text about them slightly. If you have time please cast your eyes over the couple of paragraphs and correct them as needed. I've also created the talk page with a request for help over this. Regards, Martin of Sheffield (talk) 21:52, 22 June 2014 (UTC)

Thank you for your edits. I'll reply on the talk page. Opus33 (talk) 22:18, 22 June 2014 (UTC)

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July 2014[edit]

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  • supervise the performance of his new opera ''[[La clemenza di Tito]]'', he was "already very ill" (Abert, p. 13050. During this visit, Niemetschek wrote, "he was pale and expression was sad,

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September 2014[edit]

Opus33, how can you take away, in one edit, 1,200 words? I have never seen someone remove over 1,000 words in one edit. What I put in for Haydn is truly factual, but there's no source that uses the exact words I used, so please accept at least half of my additions. Cancina5645 (talk) 21:42, 22 September 2014 (UTC)

I'll reply at the article talk page. Opus33 (talk) 23:21, 22 September 2014 (UTC)

Haydn[edit]

What a great story about Haydn's head! I have an interest in phrenology and other pseudosciences, and that's a vignette I hadn't heard. I did a minor copy edit to your recent entry; hope you don't mind. Cheers, DoctorJoeE review transgressions/talk to me! 19:46, 1 October 2014 (UTC)

Thank you, DrJE, and also thanks for copy editing. Yours very truly Opus33 (talk) 22:56, 1 October 2014 (UTC)

October 2014[edit]

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  • *http://bf.press.illinois.edu/view.php?vol=10&iss=1&f=del_mar.pdf] [[Jonathan Del Mar]] defends his Urtext edition of the Beethoven symphonies from a hostile review

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fixed

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Arctic Magic Flute[edit]

Re: your note on the Magic Flute Talk page, please take a look at:

Wikipedia:Articles for deletion/Arctic Magic Flute

Voceditenore has agreed to simply provide a very brief reference under "Adaptations", which was essentially what that production was all about. It should not burden the main M.F. page with "trivia". Viva-Verdi (talk) 22:57, 21 November 2014 (UTC)

Thank you, VV. I've withdrawn my objection, which was sort of cranky I think. Opus33 (talk)

December 2014[edit]

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  • [[Daniel Steibelt]] had written a piano concerto with a choral finale four years earlier in 1820).{{Citation needed|date=April 2014}}.</ref> [[Hector Berlioz]], who coined the term "choral

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"Offensive remarks"[edit]

Ok, reference added :) --Jbaranao (talk) 18:46, 14 January 2015 (UTC)

Thanks! Opus33 (talk) 19:45, 14 January 2015 (UTC)

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Regarding recent Mozart last rites edits[edit]

Hi Opus33. As discussed in the talk section, I don't mind including the Solomon quote, but in that case you're asking for others to include opposing scholarly quotes portraying Mozart as extremely devout. The fact is, to all appearances Mozart was a practicing Roman Catholic; that's all we know. The only real evidence we have to suggest any deviation from orthodoxy is his statement to the effect that he didn't consider eating meat on fast days to be a great sin. Halliwell's reference to "impatience" and MacIntyre's "freethinking" more than capture this point. On the other hand, Solomon's quote is nonsense; where is the evidence that Mozart thought it was acceptable to dispense with the priesthood? You found it acceptable to question Gutman's claims; why not apply the same standard to Solomon? Schlier22 (talk) 00:14, 31 March 2015 (UTC)

Precious again[edit]

music of the classical period

Cornflower blue Yogo sapphire.jpg

Thank you for showing details of master works, for helping articles to survive (leading to O holder Tag, erwünschte Zeit, BWV 210 - "O lovely day, o hoped-for time"), and for generously sharing The Creation with The Creation structure. I am working on St Matthew Passion structure and would like your help, especially regarding a question about colours in tables, see "Passion" on my talk, - repeating: you are an awesome Wikipedian (20 January 2009)!

--Gerda Arendt (talk) 10:05, 3 April 2012 (UTC)

Three years ago, you were the 81st recipient of my PumpkinSky Prize, repeated in br'erly style, --Gerda Arendt (talk) 07:48, 3 April 2015 (UTC)

I said "let's not talk about age", but for an exception: I just met a young person here who did a GA review #254 (!) on a difficult subject, Ich hatte viel Bekümmernis, BWV 21, and is not afraid of an even more difficult subject, When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd (which may be #262). I suggested a PR for the article the user came to Wikipedia for, Bentworth, going for FA. You are invited to help improving that article. --Gerda Arendt (talk) 06:21, 23 June 2015 (UTC)

Short octave bass in FWB[edit]

Hello Opus,

You recently pointed out that there are several pieces in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book which require a short-octave bass. Just to save me the time of going through the whole thing, can you possibly tell me which ones, if you happen to know them? None come to mind, but then I haven't played them all!

A propos, I'm interested in English v. continental keyboards at this period, and what conclusions (if any) may be drawn from them. As I'm sure you know, English keyboard music frequently requires F#, which doesn't figure in continental music (I don't think Sweelinck ever uses it - the greatest composer doesn't need it!). To get to the point, I wonder if John Bull's flight to the continent can be dated by his use - or not - of F#. It could be an interesting way of dating his pieces.

Best wishes Nick Michael (talk) 19:17, 13 April 2015 (UTC)

Thank you, Nick. It's a nice article, and I appreciate your putting up with me adding a trivia item to it.
Would that I had indeed ploughed through all of FVB looking for short-octave pieces, but I haven't. I know there are three by Peter Philips (one is a Pavane mentioned in Kottick's History of the Harpsichord, one is mentioned in the editors' preface to the Dover edition, and the third I spotted myself but I don't have my copy of FWB at hand at the moment).
The idea of dating works of Bull by their F#'s is very intriguing.
Regards, Opus33 (talk) 17:10, 14 April 2015 (UTC)
Thanks Opus. I'll have a look through FVB soon and see what I can find, although I do play it a lot and can't recall anything... Nick Michael (talk) 19:21, 14 April 2015 (UTC)

'Death of W.A.Mozart' article; 'funeral' section; coding/rendering.[edit]

I.e. this and this.
Before changing the code to its present form, I didn't only try to make previous coding to work but I also I tested the rendering on various browsers, versions thereof, resolutions thereof, on different OSs, natively, on VMs, locally, remotely, etc..
The change I've made is meant to fix "broken" things; I don't know which OS(s) or browser(s) you're on but wherever, whichever I've tried, the rendering of the section, using "your" code, is awful: there is an extended gap, there is empty space of non-trivial size, separating the text, the one right before the quotation, from the quotation; the quotation is never placed next-to/left-of the img.
I have screenshots to upload for you to see for yourself if you want, but before I waste any more time doing that, you might want to test for yourself; an easy-ier way to do this is by using online page-rendering-testers like this one. Thanatos|talk|contributions 00:39, 22 April 2015 (UTC)

(talk page stalker) I agree that Thanatos's version is an improvement and renders fine here. -- Michael Bednarek (talk) 06:53, 22 April 2015 (UTC)
This is fine, thanks for looking over this. Opus33 (talk) 16:41, 22 April 2015 (UTC)

Disambiguation link notification for April 28[edit]

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I know I'm talking to a robot, but just for reference I note that what's needed is to link two Beethoven sonatas at once; the disambiguation page is useful for this purpose. Opus33 (talk) 19:04, 2 May 2015 (UTC)

Mass in C major (Beethoven) has been nominated for Did You Know[edit]

Goldberg Variations[edit]

I put the Dan Tepfer Goldberg Variations/Variations version back in with a citation this time. I hope that's sufficient. SESteve (talk) 16:17, 24 June 2015 (UTC)

Thank you. Opus33 (talk) 20:21, 24 June 2015 (UTC)

Aria Variations?[edit]

I was wondering where you got the information that singers would improvise variations as well as ornaments in da capo arias (in your article: da capo aria). In the one source cited, it mentions ornaments but not variations. I'm sure that singers did improvise variations, but I wondered if you'd read that somewhere as well? In studying the cantatas of Marianna Martines, a keyboardist, composer, and singer, I'm convinced that she improvised extensively in the repeated A section, because otherwise the sections of the piece don't come anywhere near the golden mean, as her concerti do. Thanks! — Preceding unsigned comment added by 147.26.111.232 (talk) 21:47, 25 June 2015 (UTC)

Thank you. I think this was sloppy of me and the article should say "ornaments" unless there are reference sources to back up "variations". Opus33 (talk)

Hi, This is the same person, I wonder if we get variations from "partimenti," (which means variations) which were sets of exercises for singers or keyboardists to teach them how to improvise. They were used in Naples in the seventeenth century. They also exist for guitar and violin. From Grove. Improvisation II: Western Art Music:

"A new type of improvisatory piece called a partimento arose in the Baroque period with the inception of the thoroughbass. In thoroughbass practice both the bass line and the melody are given, while in the partimento only the bass line with figures is given, over which it was the performer’s responsibility to improvise self-contained pieces, character-pieces often called toccatas, and even fugues. Practised mostly in Italy, the partimento is closely related to the English practice of making divisions on a ground (see §(ii) above). Partimento improvisations were cultivated extensively as pedagogical exercises in the later Baroque period, when numerous collections were published by Gaetano Greco, Francesco Durante, Carlo Contumacci, Gaetano Franzaroli and Giuseppe Saratelli."

Bananaquiet (talk) 23:25, 28 June 2015 (UTC)

Hmm... this is interesting and belongs in Wikipedia somewhere. But I feel it doesn't really fit into the Da capo aria article. Maybe poke around what we have on variations, or on Baroque performance practice, and see if it fits in there? Opus33 (talk) 16:17, 29 June 2015 (UTC)

DYK for Mass in C major (Beethoven)[edit]

Gatoclass (talk) 00:52, 7 July 2015 (UTC)

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Moonlight sonata[edit]

Hi Opus33, I have inserted a different version at the top. What do you think? Cheers.Anythingyouwant (talk) 21:48, 26 July 2015 (UTC)

August 2015[edit]

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Category:Mozart in fiction[edit]

Category:Mozart in fiction, which you created, has been nominated for possible deletion, merging, or renaming. If you would like to participate in the discussion, you are invited to add your comments at the category's entry on the Categories for discussion page. Thank you. The Evil IP address (talk) 10:49, 27 August 2015 (UTC)