Usersatet

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Usersatet
Viceroy of Kush
Inscriptions for Birds on Sehel Island.jpg
Usersatet, depicted in a rock carving on the island of Sehel
Predecessor Nehi
Successor Amenhotep
Dynasty 18th Dynasty
Pharaoh Amenhotep II

Usersatet was an Ancient Egyptian official with the titles king's son of Kush (Viceroy of Kush) and overseer of the southern countries. He was in office under king Amenhotep II and perhaps in the early years of the reign of Thutmosis IV. As king's son of Kush he was the main official in charge of the Nubian provinces.

Usersatet was perhaps born in Elephantine or at least the region around this island. The main deity of Elephantine was Satet. The name Usersatet means Satet is strong. Usersatet's father was Siamun, his mother the king's ornament Nenwenhermenetes. Not much is known about his parents.[1]

It seems that Usersatet grow up in the royal palace and followed the king on his military campaign to Syria. He cleaned 5 canals in the region of Aswan. The canals were already more than 700 years old and were most likely filled with sand in the 18th Dynasty.[2] Usersatet is known from a high number of monuments especially in Lower Nubia. Near Qasr Ibrim he erected in honour of king Amenhotep II as chapel. A stela found at Semna bears a copy of a king's letter to Usersatet. However, no biography of this official survived. Therefore there is not much known about his life and career. His name was on many monuments deleted. Therefore it seems that he felt in dishonour at some point in his career. His tomb is not yet identified.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ W. K. Simpson: Usersatet, in: W. Helck, W. Westendorf (editors): Lexikon der Ägyptologie, VI, Wiesbaden 1986 ISBN 3-447-02663-4, 901
  2. ^ W. K. Simpson: Usersatet, in: W. Helck, W. Westendorf (editors): Lexikon der Ägyptologie, VI, Wiesbaden 1986 ISBN 3-447-02663-4, 901-902
  3. ^ Labib Habachi: Königssohn von Kusch, in: W. Helck, W. Westendorf (editors): Lexikon der Ägyptologie, III, Wiesbaden 1980 ISBN 3-447-02100-4, 628