Utah Medical Cannabis Act initiative

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The Utah Medical Cannabis Act is an initiative to legalize medical cannabis that qualified to appear on the November 2018 ballot in the U.S. state of Utah as Proposition 2.

A group called Utah Patients Coalition filed the Utah Medical Cannabis Act initiative in June, 2017.[1] By the beginning of the year, the group had gathered more than half of the 113,000 signatures required to get an initiative for medical cannabis on the November ballot.[2] The initiative allows for topicals, cannabis oil, cannabis edibles and vaping,[3] but not smoking. Polls in the second half of 2017 showed up to 78% support for the initiative.[4]

On March 26, the Lieutenant Governor's office validated 117,000 signatures on the Utah Medical Cannabis Act initiative, enough for it to get on the November ballot.[5] On May 29, the Lieutenant Governor announced that over 153,000 signatures had been validated, and the initiative would still be appearing on the November ballot, despite a contentious effort by initiative opponents to have some names removed.[6]

Groups and individuals supporting and opposing the initiative[edit]

Some groups and individuals have made their position on the inititiative known.

Support[edit]

The sponsor, Utah Patients Coalition, was joined by Together for Responsible Use and Cannabis Education (TRUCE) Utah and by Libertas Institute.[7]

Opposition[edit]

Governor Gary Herbert stated on March 29 that he would "actively oppose" the initiative.[8] The Utah Medical Association urged voters who signed the petition to call county clerks to have their names removed.[9]

After initially "repeatedly declin[ing] to weigh in" with media on its position,[10] the LDS Church issued a statement on April 10 endorsing the Utah Medical Association's position and opposing the initiative.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Michelle L. Price (June 26, 2017), Utah Group Files 2018 Medical Marijuana Ballot Initiative – A group of activists and Utah residents with chronic conditions has launched a ballot initiative to ask voters next year to pass a broad medical marijuana law., Associated Press – via US News
  2. ^ ‘I think it’s gonna happen’ Governor Herbert says of medical marijuana in Utah, Salt Lake City: KSTU-TV, January 3, 2018
  3. ^ Kelly Gifford (June 26, 2017), "Yes to medical marijuana in Utah, no to smoking it: Here's what Utahns may vote on in 2018", Salt Lake Tribune
  4. ^ Utah Medical Marijuana Initiative (2018), Ballotpedia, retrieved 2018-02-22
  5. ^ Ben Winslow (March 26, 2018), It looks like medical marijuana will be on the November ballot in Utah, Salt Lake City: KSTU News
  6. ^ Lee Davidson (May 29, 2018), "Utahns will be voting on medical marijuana and Medicaid expansion — but not Utah's candidate nominating law", Salt Lake Tribune
  7. ^ Simone Francis (April 2, 2018), Utah Medical Association weighs in on medical marijuana ballot initiative, KTVX
  8. ^ Ben Lockhart (March 29, 2018), "Utah governor vows to 'actively oppose' medical marijuana ballot initiative", Deseret News
  9. ^ Taylor W. Anderson (April 2, 2018), "Utah Medical Association accuses medical marijuana campaign of misleading voters into supporting initiative", Salt Lake Tribune
  10. ^ Ben Winslow (April 2, 2018), Medical marijuana advocates meet with LDS Church ahead of ballot initiative, KSTU News
  11. ^ Ben Lockhart (April 10, 2018), "LDS Church issues statement on proposed Utah marijuana initiative", Deseret News

External links[edit]