Utopia for Realists

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Utopia for Realists: The Case for a Universal Basic Income, Open Borders, and a 15-hour Workweek
Utopia for Realists.png
AuthorRutger Bregman
Audio read byPeter Noble
Original titleGratis geld voor iedereen
TranslatorElizabeth Manton
CountryNetherlands
LanguageDutch
PublisherDe Correspondent
Publication date
November 2016
Media typePrint
Pages288
ISBN978-9082520347
OCLC1039088412

Utopia for Realists: The Case for a Universal Basic Income, Open Borders, and a 15-hour Workweek (alternatively subtitled And How We Can Get There and How We Can Build the Ideal World) is a book by Dutch popular historian Rutger Bregman.[1] It was originally written as articles in Dutch for a virtual journal, De Correspondent, and was since compiled and published,[2] and translated into several languages. It offers a critical proposal that it claims is a practical approach to reconstructing modern society to promote a more productive and equitable life based on three core ideas:

Thesis[edit]

Rationale[edit]

As a result of the advance of international trade and economic science in recent decades, globalization has radically transformed the traditional social and economic order from smaller, connected nations to a new world economy which, while already demonstrably capable of rescuing millions of people from poverty, could be extended to the entire human species.[3]

However, the new global system unfairly compensates a few rich countries,[4] and, with the progressive substitution of human capital with automation and robotics,[5] has also generated an increase in inequality, both between the investment community and its workforce[6] within the G20 states as well as between developed countries and their developing neighbours.

Justification[edit]

Each idea is supported by multiple academic studies and anecdotal evidence including numerous success stories, quoting Richard Nixon's 1968 plan for a basic income for Americans,[7] the Mincome project in the Canadian city of Dauphin, Manitoba, which "eliminated poverty" and reduced hospitalisation rates,[8] and the perceived success of the Schengen Agreement.[9]

Reception[edit]

In her review for The Independent, Caroline Lucas described the book as a "brilliantly written and unorthodox page-turner."[10]

Writing for The Observer, Will Hutton said, "You may not dream the same dreams as Bregman – but he invites you to take dreaming seriously. For that alone, this book is worth a read."[11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]