Utva 213 Vihor

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Vihor
BAM-44-Utva 213-3 Vihor.jpg
Role Advanced military trainer
National origin FPR Yugoslavia
Designer Government Factories
First flight 1949
Introduction 1952
Retired 1961
Primary user Yugoslav Air Force
Produced 1952-54
Number built 196
Developed into Soko 522

Utva 213 Vihor was a late 1940s Yugoslavian two-seat advanced trainer.[1]

Design and development[edit]

Designed and built by the Yugoslav state factory, the Type 213 was first flown in 1949, a cantilever low-wing monoplane powered by a 520 hp (388 kW) Ranger SVG-770-CB1 engine.[1] The prototype had a conventional landing gear which retracted forward, the second prototype and production aircraft had a wider track main gear that retracted inwards.[1] It had an enclosed cockpit for the instructor and student in tandem under a long glazed canopy.[1] For training the Vihor had two forward-facing machine guns and could carry up to 100 kg of bombs.[1] In 1957 an improved radial engined variant entered service as the Type 522.[1]

Survivors[edit]

Vihor on display at the Museum of Yugoslav Aviation

One aircraft is on display at the Museum of Yugoslav Aviation, Belgrade, Serbia.

Specifications[edit]

Data from Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1956–57[2]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Length: 11.52 m (37 ft 10 in)
  • Wingspan: 11.0 m (36 ft 1 in)
  • Height: 3.58 m (11 ft 9 in)
  • Gross weight: 2,300 kg (5,071 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Ranger SVG-770C-1B air-cooled inverted V12 engine, 390 kW (520 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 362 km/h (225 mph; 195 kn)
  • Stall speed: 118 km/h (73 mph; 64 kn)
  • Service ceiling: 7,000 m (23,000 ft)

Armament

  • Guns: 2× machine guns
  • Bombs: 2× 50 kg (110 lb) or 4× 25 kg (55 lb) bombs

See also[edit]

Related development

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Orbis 1985, p. 1996
  2. ^ Bridgman 1956, pp. 349–350.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Bridgman, Leonard (1956). Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1956–57. New York: The McGraw Hill Book Company.
  • The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft (Part Work 1982-1985). Orbis Publishing.