Vasily Velichko

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Vasily Velichko
Vasily Velichko.jpg
Born Vasily Lvovich Velichko
Василий Львович Величко

(1860-07-14)July 14, 1860
Pryluky, Poltava Governorate, Ukraine (then Russian Empire)
Died January 13, 1904(1904-01-13) (aged 43)
St Petersburg, Russian Empire
Occupation dramatist, poet, editor, theatre critic, publicist, political activist
Years active 1880-1904
Awards Griboyedov Prize (1894)

Vasily Lvovich Velichko (Russian: Васи́лий Льво́вич Вели́чко; 14 July 1860, Pryluky, Poltava Governorate, Ukraine, then Russian Empire, – 13 January 1904 in Saint Petersburg) was a Russian poet, playwright and publicist, one of the leaders of Russian Assembly,[1][2] and editor of the semi-official Kavkaz gazette.

Known as a Russian chauvinist,[3] he demonstrated blatant intolerance to the Armenians[4][5] and tried to set them on other populations in the Caucasus. He was active during the period when the imperial Russian authorities carried out a purposeful anti-Armenian policy.

According to the Russian historian V. Shnirelman, "it is curious that his works were re-published in Azerbaijan in the early 1990s and received wide popularity there".[6] Velichko's "forgotten racist tract" was reissued by Ziya Bunyadov's academy.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Velichko’s biography at the Brockhaus and Efron Encyclopedic Dictionary
  2. ^ Василий Величко // Черная сотня. Историческая энциклопедия 1900-1917. Отв. редактор О.А. Платонов. М., Крафт, Институт русской цивилизации, 2008.
  3. ^ Problemy istorii Rossii v konservativnoi publitsistike vtoroi poloviny 19 - nachala 20 v., 1990, p. 6, by I. V. Kurukin
  4. ^ "Albanian Myth" (in Russian) / V.A. Shnirelman, "Voyni pamyati. Mifi, identichnost i politika v Zakavkazye", Moscow, Academkniga, 2003
  5. ^ Benthall, Jonathan (ed.), The best of Anthropology Today, 2002, Routledge, ISBN 0415262550, p. 350 by Anatoly Khazanov
  6. ^ "Albanian Myth" (in Russian) / V.A. Shnirelman, "Voyni pamyati. Mifi, identichnost i politika v Zakavkazye", Moscow, Academkniga, 2003
  7. ^ Black Garden: Armenia and Azerbaijan Through Peace and War, by Thomas De Waal, 2004, p. 152