VEX Robotics Competition

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VEX Robotics Competition
Current season, competition or edition:
Current sports event VEX Robotics Tower Takeover/VEX IQ Challenge Squared Away
Vex-Logo.jpg
SportRobotics-related games
FoundedTony Norman
Bob Mimlitch
Inaugural season2007
No. of teamsTotal Registered: 20,000
VRC: 11,400
VEXU: 300
VEXIQ: 8,500
Over 40 countries [1]
Most recent
champion(s)

2019 Champions:
Excellence Award Winners :
United States VRC HS: 2011C: "Brecksville Robotics"
United States VRC MS: 9364X "Brentwood Academy"
United States VEXU: USC: "University of Southern California"
United States VEXIQ ES: 10142: "Manoa Elementary"
United Kingdom VEXIQ MS: 21549: Queen Elizabeth's School, Barnet

World Tournament Champions:
China VRC HS: 98060C : "Shanghai Jing'an Science Technology Youth Center"
United States VRC HS: 7405P: "Millburn High School"
China VRC MS: 7671C: "New Century Robotics Club"
China VRC MS: 9123A: "ShangHai RuiGuan Robotics Activity Center"
China VEXU: XJTU4: "XJTU TEAM"
China VEXIQ ES: 15472A: "Laoshan Sec Expe-A崂山二小"
China VEXIQ ES: 88299B: "Science museum 2"
China VEXIQ MS: 12580F: "FuzhouNO.1HS&CFR"
Canada VEXIQ MS: 1104Z: "Discobots ζ"
TV partner(s)ESPN2 (2016)
CBS Sports (2017)
Official websitewww.vexrobotics.com

The VEX Robotics Competition is a robotics competition for elementary through university students. It is a subset of VEX Robotics, which is in turn a subset of Innovation First International. The VEX Robotics World Championship, run by the Robotics Education and Competition Foundation[2] in April 2018 was named the largest robotics competition in the world by Guinness World Records.[3]

There are three divisions of this robotics competition meant for different age groups and skill levels: VEX EDR, VEX U, and VEX IQ. VEX EDR is for middle and high school students, VEX U is for university students, and VEX IQ is for elementary and middle school students only. In the competition, students are given a yearly challenge, and must design, build, program, and drive a robot to complete the challenge as best as they can.

The description and rules for the following season's competition are released during the world championship of the previous year. Since 2015, the VEX robotics World Championship has been held in Louisville, Kentucky each year in mid April.[4]

[5]

VEX Robotics Competition (VRC)[edit]

VEX Robotics Competition(VRC) is a robotics competition for middle school and high school students with two different divisions: middle school and high school. In this competition, teams design, build, and program robots to compete at tournaments. Students from Grades 6-12 may participate. At tournaments, teams participate in qualifying matches where two teams vs two teams participate. In the Elimination Rounds, alliances of two teams are selected by the top-seeded teams, and the alliance who wins the finals is the winner of the tournament.[6]

The current challenge is VEX Robotics Competition: Tower Takeover

Rules[edit]

Middle and high school students have the same game and rules. The most general and basic rules for https://www.vexrobotics.com/vexedr/competition/vrc-current-gameare as follows, but each year may have exceptions.[7]

  • Each robot is paired up with one other, and they compete against two other robots. The team colors are red and blue.
  • No robot may exceed the dimensions of an 18" cube until the match has begun.
  • At the start of the match is a 15-second autonomous period, where all four robots navigate the field entirely by themselves.
  • After the autonomous period is the driver control period, which is 1 minute and 45 seconds of manual control of the robot through a handheld controller.

Current game: Tower Takeover[edit]

The object of the game is to attain a higher score than the opposing Alliance by stacking cubes in goals, and by placing cubes in towers. There are five (5) neutral towers, two (2) alliance towers, twenty two (22) green cubes, twenty two (22) purple cubes, twenty two (22) orange cubes, and four (4) goals.

Cubes can be stacked in goals of your Alliance color, and can also be placed into towers which adds value to the colour of the cube placed. The added value applies for both Alliances. Cubes placed into the towers have no value.

Each Green Cube Scored in a goal 1 point + 1 point for every Green Cube Placed in Towers
Each Orange Cube Scored in a goal 1 point + 1 point for every Orange Cube Placed in Towers
Each Purple Cube Scored in a goal 1 point + 1 point for every Purple Cube Placed in Towers
Autonomous Bonus 6 points or 3 points for a tied match

[8]

Future games[edit]

There has been talk of a water related game for 2020-2021. This idea is rumored to have come from DRow , a moderator for the Vex Forum. DRow is currently running to be in GDC, or the Vex Game Design Committee

Previous games[edit]

2018-2019: Turning Point

2017-2018: In The Zone

2016-2017: Starstruck

2015-2016: Nothing But Net

2014-2015: Skyrise

2013-2014: Toss Up

2012-2013: Sack Attack

2011-2012: Gateway

2010-2011: Round Up

2009-2010: Clean Sweep

2008-2009: Elevation

2007-2008: Bridge Battle[9]

VEX U[edit]

The VEX U level competition is for college and university students. The rules are nearly identical for this division as for the EDR division, but VEX U teams are allowed to take advantage of more customization and greater flexibility than other levels. Also, their robot creation is limited by the need to find effective costs and a restricted development environment in order to model a real-world situation. In addition, in past competitions, Vex U teams needed to create two different complementary robots, one big and one small, and program them to work together to defeat opponent teams.[10]

In the VEX U competition although very similar to VRC EDR competition, has some distinguishable rules to its division. Rather than being limited to an 18" cube, in VEX U you have the availability to go up to a 24" cube. The autonomous period is also extended in competitions to last 45 seconds, where all interaction with robots is strictly prohibited. As a result, the driver control period is shortened to a period of 75 seconds, immediately after the autonomous period.

Starting in the 2016-2017 game Starstruck, rather than having the usual 2-robot vs 2-robot format, VEX U matches would be 1-team vs 1-team. However, this was replaced after the 2017-2018 season In the Zone, and the games since have reverted to the 2-robot vs 2-robot format.[11]

VEX IQ challenge[edit]

The VEX IQ Challenge, presented by the Robotics Education & Competition Foundation, provides elementary and middle school students with exciting, open-ended robotics and research project challenges that enhance their science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) skills through hands-on, student-centered learning. A VEX IQ Robotics set is used, with plastic pieces that snap together using pegs, and it is extremely easy to construct a robot. The students use a graphical software to program the robot. There are two parts to the contests: Robot Skills, which is a single robot trying to score as many points as possible, and the Teamwork Challenge, where two robots attempt to work together to complete the same task.[12]

Current game[edit]

The VEX IQ Challenge - Squared Away

VEX IQ Challenge Squared Away is played on a 4’x8’ rectangular field. Two robots compete in the Teamwork Challenge as an alliance in 60 second long teamwork matches, working collaboratively to score points. Teams also compete in the Robot Skills Challenge where one robot takes the field to score as many points as possible. These matches consist of Driving Skills Matches, which will be entirely driver controlled, and Programming Skills Matches, which will be autonomous with limited human interaction.

The object of the game is to attain the highest score by scoring Balls in or on Cubes, and scoring Cubes in Corner Goals or on Platforms.

The details:

There are a total of thirty-five (35) Balls and seven (7) Cubes available as scoring objects in the game. The object of the game is to maximize your score with your alliance partner by scoring Balls in or on Cubes and scoring Cubes on top of Platforms or in Corner Goals.

Scoring:

Each Ball scored in a Cube 1 point
Each Ball scored on a Cube 2 points
Each Cube placed in a Corner Goal 10 points
Each Cube placed on a Platform 20 points

Previous games[edit]

2018-2019: Next level[edit]

The game:

VEX IQ Challenge Next Level is played on a 4’x8’ rectangular field configured as seen above. Two robots compete in the Teamwork Challenge as an alliance in 60 second long teamwork matches, working collaboratively to score points. Teams also compete in the Robot Skills Challenge where one robot takes the field to score as many points as possible. These matches consist of Driving Skills Matches, which will be entirely driver controlled, and Programming Skills Matches, which will be autonomous with limited human interaction.

The object of the game is to attain the highest score by scoring and stacking coloured Hubs in Building Zones, removing Bonus Hubs from the Hanging Structure, and by Parking or Hanging on the Hanging Bar.

The details:

There are a total of fifteen (15) Hubs, plus two (2) Bonus Hubs available as scoring objects in the game. The object of the game is to maximize your score with your alliance partner by scoring Hubs in Building Zones, and by Parking underneath or Hanging from the Hanging Structure.

Scoring:

Each Low Scored Hub 1 point
Each High Scored Hub 2 points
Each Bonus Hub removed from the Hanging Structure 1 points
Each Low Scored Bonus Hub 2 points
Each High Scored Bonus Hub 4 points
Each robot Parked underneath Hanging Structure 1 point
Each Low Hanging Robot 2 Points
Each High Hanging Robot 4 Points

2017-2018: Ringmaster[edit]

The game: Ringmaster is played on a 4’x8’ rectangular field configured as seen above. Two robots compete in the Teamwork Challenge as an alliance in 60-second long teamwork matches, working collaboratively to score points. Teams also compete in the Robot Skills Challenge where one robot takes the field to score as many points as possible. These matches consist of Driving Skills Matches, which will be entirely driver-controlled, and Programming Skills Matches, which will be autonomous with limited human interaction. The object of the game is to attain the highest score by Scoring colored Rings on the Floor Goal and on Posts, by having Uniform Posts, by Emptying Starting Pegs, and by Releasing the Bonus Tray.


2016-2017: Crossover[edit]

The game:

Crossover is played on a 4’x8’ rectangular field. Two robots compete in the Teamwork Challenge as an alliance in 60 second long teamwork matches, working collaboratively to score points. Teams also compete in two additional challenges; The Robot Skills Challenge where one robot takes the field to score as many points as possible under driver control; The Programming Skills Challenge where one robot scores as many points as possible autonomously, without any driver inputs. The object of the game is to attain the highest score by Scoring Hexballs in their colored Scoring Zone and Goals, and by Parking and Balancing Robots on the Bridge.

The details:

There are a total of twenty-eight (28) Hexballs available as scoring objects in the game. There are two (2) Scoring Zones, sixteen (16) Low Goals, twelve (12) Elevated Goals, and one (1) Bridge on the field.

Scoring:

Each Hexball Scored in the Scoring Zone 1 point
Each Hexball scored in the Low Goal 3 points
Each Hexball Scored in the Elevated Goal 5 points
Having One Robot Parked on the Bridge 5 points
Having Two Robots Parked on the Bridge 15 points
Having All Robots Parked on a Balanced Bridge 25 points

2015-2016: Bank shot[edit]

The game:

BankShot is played on a 4’x8’ rectangular field. Two robots compete in the Teamwork Challenge as an alliance in 60 second long teamwork matches, working collaboratively to score points. Teams also compete in two additional challenges. The Robot Skills Challenge where one robot takes the field to score as many points as possible under driver control. The Programming Skills Challenge where one robot scores as many points as possible autonomously, without any driver inputs. The object of the game is to attain the highest score by Emptying Cutouts, Scoring Balls into the Scoring Zone and Goals, and by Parking Robots on the Ramp.

The details:

There are a total of forty-four (44) Balls available as Scoring Objects in the game. There is one (1) Scoring Zone, one (1) Goal, one (1) Ramp, and sixteen (16) Cutouts on the field.

Scoring:

Each Ball Scored in the Scoring 1 point
Each Emptied Cutout 1 point
Each Ball Scored in the Goal 3 points
Having One Robot Parked on the Ramp 10 points
Having Two Robots Parked on the Ramp 25 points

2014-2015: Highrise[edit]

The game:

VEX IQ Challenge Highrise is played on a 4’x8’ rectangular field. Two robots work collaboratively, as an alliance, to score points in Teamwork Challenge matches of 60 seconds in length. Teams can also participate in two additional challenges. The Robot Skills Challenge, where one robot takes the field to score as many points as possible under driver control, and The Programming Skills Challenge, where one robot scores as many points as possible autonomously, without any driver inputs. The object of the game is to attain the highest possible score by Scoring Cubes in the Scoring Zone and by building Skyrises of Cubes of the same color on the Skyrise Bases.

The details:

There are a total of thirty-six (36) Cubes, twelve (12) of each color, available as Scoring Objects in the game. There is one (1) Scoring Zone and three (3) Skyrise Bases on the field. Each Robot (smaller than 13”x19”x15” to start) begins a match on one of two Starting Positions.

Scoring:

Each Cube Scored in the Scoring Zone A point value equal to the Highrise Height of the same color as the

Cube (i.e., if a team builds a Highrise of 3 red Scoring Cubes on the

Highrise Base, a red cube in the Scoring Zone is worth 3 points.)

2013-2014: Add it up[edit]

The game:

Toss Up is played on a 4’x8’ rectangular field. Two robots compete as an alliance in 60 second long teamwork matches, working collaboratively to score points. The object of the game is to attain highest possible Alliance Score by Scoring your Small and Large BuckyBalls into the Floor, Low and High Goals, Filling Scoring Rings, and having robots Hang from Hanging Bar at the end of the Match.

The details:

There are a total of thirty-six (36) Small BuckyBalls and four (4) Large BuckyBalls available as Scoring Objects in the game. There are four (4) Floor Goals, two (2) Low Goals, two (2) High Goals, and four (4) Scoring Rings, as well as a Hanging Bar. Each Robot, shorter than 12” to start, begins a match on one of their Starting Tiles. There are four (4) Floor Goal, two (2) Low Goals, and two (2) High Goals that Robots can Score Objects into. Alliances also earn points for Filling Scoring Rings and having Robots Hanging from the Hanging Bar at the end of the Match.

Scoring:

A Small BuckyBall Scored in the Floor Goal 1 point
A Small BuckyBall Scored in the Low Goal 2 points
A Small BuckyBall Scored in the High Goal 3 points
A Large BuckyBall Scored in the Floor Goal 3 points
A Large BuckyBall Scored in the Low Goal 5 points
A Scoring Ring that is Filled 5 points
A Large BuckyBall Scored in the High Goal 8 points
A Robot that is Hanging at the end of the match 8 points

2012-2013: Rings-N-Things[13][edit]

The game:

VEX Rings-n-Things is played on a 4 ft x 8 ft field, surrounded by a 3 1/2 inch tall perimeter. There are four goals and eight rings into which teams can score thirty-six balls. The field is divided by the ramp.

The details:

While participating in the VEX Pilot Program – Rings-n-Things, teams will develop many new skills in response to the challenges and obstacles that stand before them. Some problems will be solved by individuals, while others will be handled through interaction with their student teammates and adult members. Teams will work together to build a VEX robot to compete in the World Championship of VEX Robotics. Students come away not only with the accomplishments of building their own competition robot, but also with an appreciation of science and technology and how they might use it to positively impact the world around them. In addition, they cultivate life skills such as planning, brainstorming, collaboration, teamwork, and leadership as well as research and technical skills.

Scoring:

A Ball Scored in a Low Goal 1 alliance point
A Ball Scored in a High Goal 3 alliance points
A Ball Scored in a Scoring Ring 2 alliance points; 1 individual point
A Robot that is parked at the end of match 2 alliance points
A Second Robot parked at the end of match 3 alliance points

VEX Robotics World Championship[edit]

Venues:

Venue Location Year/Years
California State University Northridge Los Angeles, California, USA 2008
Dallas Convention Center Dallas, Texas, USA 2009-2010
ESPN Wide World of Sports Complex Kissimmee, Florida, USA 2011
Anaheim Convention Center Anaheim, California, USA 2012-2014
Kentucky Exposition Center & Freedom Hall (Finals) Louisville, Kentucky, USA 2015-2020
Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center Dallas, Texas, USA 2021-2024

The VEX Robotics World Championship brings together qualifying teams from the three VEX Robotics programs; the VEX IQ Challenge (elementary and middle school), VEX Robotics Competition (middle school and high school), and VEX U (college), for a celebration of the robotics community and to crown World Champions. The event has been held in Louisville Kentucky since April 2014.

A one-hour special version of the 2016 VEX Robotics World Championship aired on ESPN2 in June 2016.[14] CBS aired a one-hour special version of the 2017 VEX Robotics World Championship on June 11.[15]

During the VEX Robotics World Championship, a "Parade of Nations" is held in Freedom Hall that includes hundreds of students from more than 30 countries. The students wear costumes from such as Star Wars characters, Iron Man, starfish, etc.[16]

Role in pedagogy[edit]

VEX Robotics Competitions have been of interest to educators as a way of stimulating students' interest in hands-on learning. The Department of Engineering and Technology Education at Utah State University has created a Design Academy with a curriculum for teaching skills through participation in a VEX Robotics Competition.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "VEX Robotics VRC Team List". VRC. Retrieved May 24, 2018.
  2. ^ "Home". REC Foundation. Retrieved July 7, 2019.
  3. ^ Stephenson, Kristen (May 16, 2018). "Over 30,000 students help to break the record for largest robot competition". guinnessworldrecords. Retrieved July 7, 2019.
  4. ^ "VEX Robotics World Championship". roboticseducation.org. Retrieved April 17, 2017.
  5. ^ "2019-2020 current game". VEX. VEX. Retrieved December 4, 2019.
  6. ^ "VEX EDR". Retrieved April 17, 2017.
  7. ^ "VEX Current Game Manual". Retrieved December 4, 2019.
  8. ^ "2019-20 VEX Robotics Competition Game". VEX Robotics. July 13, 2016. Retrieved July 7, 2019.
  9. ^ "Past Competitions". Retrieved April 17, 2017.
  10. ^ "VEXU". Retrieved April 17, 2017.
  11. ^ "Appendix E - Vex U" (PDF).
  12. ^ "VEX IQ". Retrieved April 17, 2017.
  13. ^ "Competition History". REC Foundation. Retrieved July 7, 2019.
  14. ^ "Robotics program transforms Galveston team into world champs". USA TODAY High School Sports. July 19, 2016. Retrieved November 16, 2017.
  15. ^ "Homeschooled students compete in world robotics competition". Midland Reporter-Telegram. Retrieved November 16, 2017.
  16. ^ "How the 'Olympics of Robotics' shines a spotlight on girls and minorities in science". TechRepublic. Retrieved December 21, 2017.
  17. ^ Robinson, Trevor P.; Stewardson, Gary A. (October 2012). "Exciting students through VEX Robotic Competitions". Technology and Engineering Teacher. 72 (2): 15–21.

External links[edit]