VTOL Aircraft Phillicopter

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Phillicopter
Role Light utility helicopter
National origin Australia
Manufacturer VTOL Aircraft
First flight 1971

The VTOL Aircraft Phillicopter is a 1970s Australian light utility helicopter designed and built by VTOL Aircraft of Newcastle West, New South Wales.[1]

Design[edit]

Duan A. Phillips began work on design of a two seat helicopter in 1962, and started to build a prototype in 1967. The prototype, the Phillicopter Mark I, was completed and first flew in 1971, powered by a single 145 hp (108 kW) Rolls-Royce Continental O-200 engine.[2] Phillips set up VTOL Aircraft Pty Ltd in 1971 to construct and develop the Phillicopter.[3] The Phillicopter was granted its Australian type certificate in 1984,[4] and the prototype was modified to represent a pre-production standard.[5]

The Phillicopter is a conventional two-seat helicopter with a two-blade rotor powered by a 180 hp (134 kW) Lycoming O-360 piston engine.[1] It has an enclosed cabin with removable doors and is fitted with dual controls.[1] The open frame fuselage has a two-blade tail rotor at the rear.[1] A 91-litre fuel tank is fitted and an optional 91-litre central tank can be fitted, although this can also be used for crop spraying chemicals rather than fuel.[1] The Phillicopter has a fixed skid type landing gear.[1]

Specifications[edit]

Data from [1]Brassey's World Aircraft & Systems Directory

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Length: 7.07 m (23 ft 2 in)
  • Height: 2.59 m (8 ft 6 in)
  • Empty weight: 454 kg (1,000 lb)
  • Max takeoff weight: 703 kg (1,550 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Lycoming O-360 piston engine, 130 kW (180 hp)
  • Main rotor diameter: 7.77 m (25 ft 6 in)
  • Main rotor area: 47.38 m2 (510.0 sq ft)

Performance

  • Cruise speed: 139 km/h (86 mph; 75 kn)
  • Never exceed speed: 203 km/h (126 mph; 110 kn)
  • Range: 694 km (431 mi; 375 nmi) with full payload and optional centre tank.
  • Service ceiling: 4,900 m (16,000 ft)

See also[edit]

Related lists

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Taylor 1996, p. 297
  2. ^ Taylor 1976, pp. 8–9.
  3. ^ Gunston 2005, p. 491.
  4. ^ Taylor 1988, p. 7.
  5. ^ Lambert 1993, p. 11.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Gunston, Bill (2005). World Encyclopedia of Aircraft Manufacturers (Second ed.). Stroud, UK: Sutton Publishing. ISBN 0-7509-3981-8. 
  • Lambert, Mark (1993). Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1993–94. Coulsdon, UK: Jane's Data Division. ISBN 0-7106-1066-1. 
  • Taylor, John W. R. (1976). Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1976–77. London: Jane's Yearbooks. ISBN 0-354-00538-3. 
  • Taylor, John W. R. (1988). Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1988–89. Coulsdon, UK: Jane's Defence Data. ISBN 0-7106-0867-5. 
  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1996). Brassey's World Aircraft & Systems Directory 1996/97. London, England: Brassey's. ISBN 9781574880632. 

External links[edit]