Vaccinium macrocarpon

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Vaccinium macrocarpon
Cranberry bog.jpg
Scientific classification
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V. macrocarpon
Binomial name
Vaccinium macrocarpon
Aiton 1789
Synonyms[1][2]

Vaccinium macrocarpon (also called large cranberry, American cranberry and bearberry) is a North American species of cranberry of the subgenus Oxycoccus and genus Vaccinium.

Vaccinium macrocarpon is native to central and eastern Canada (Ontario to Newfoundland) and the northeastern and north-central United States (Northeast, Great Lakes Region, and Appalachians as far south as North Carolina and Tennessee).[3] It is also naturalized in parts of Europe and scattered locations in North America along western Canada (British Columbia) and the western United States (West Coast).

Vaccinium macrocarpon is a shrub, often ascending (trailing along the surface of the ground for some distance but then curving upwards). It produces white or pink flowers followed by sour-tasting red or pink berries 9–14 mm (0.35–0.55 in) across.[4][5]

The species is grown commercially as a cash crop for its edible berries.[6] Many of these are grown in artificial ponds called cranberry bogs.[7] There is some evidence suggesting that the berries or their juice is useful in treating certain urinary tract infections.[8][9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tropicos, Vaccinium macrocarpon Aiton
  2. ^ The Plant List, Vaccinium macrocarpon Aiton
  3. ^ "Biota of North America Program 2014 county distribution map". BONAP.net. Retrieved 13 June 2017.
  4. ^ Flora of North America, Vaccinium macrocarpon Aiton, 1789. Cranberry, canneberge gros fruits
  5. ^ Aiton, William. 1789. Hortus Kewensis, or, A catalogue of the plants cultivated in the Royal Botanic Garden at Kew 2: 13 and plate 7 description in Latin on page 13; full-page color illustration on plate 7 (between pages 12 and 13)
  6. ^ "Vaccinium macrocarpon American Cranberry, Cranberry PFAF Plant Database". www.PFAF.org. Retrieved 13 June 2017.
  7. ^ University of Massachusetts, Natural History of the American Cranberry, Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.
  8. ^ Mayo Clinic, Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon)
  9. ^ Pérez-López, FR; Haya, J; Chedraui, P. "Vaccinium macrocarpon: an interesting option for women with recurrent urinary tract infections and other health benefits". J Obstet Gynaecol Res. 35: 630–9. doi:10.1111/j.1447-0756.2009.01026.x. PMID 19751320.

External links[edit]

  • Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, University of Texas
  • Zalapa, J.E.; Bougie, T.C.; Bougie, T.A.; Schlautman, B.J.; Wiesman, E.; Guzman, A.; Fajardo, D.A.; Steffan, S.; Smith, T. (6 November 2014). "Clonal diversity and genetic differentiation revealed by SSR markers in wild Vaccinium macrocarpon and Vaccinium oxycoccos". Annals of Applied Biology. 166 (2): 196–207. doi:10.1111/aab.12173.