Vaghela dynasty

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The Vaghela dynasty was a short-lived Indian Rajput dynasty who ruled Gujarat at the second half of the 13th century, from 1243 to 1299 CE. Based in the town of Dholka, present Ahmedabad district, it was also the last Hindu ruling dynasty of the region, before the Muslim rulers, came in. Their rule ended only in 18th-century when Marathas took over the state.[1]

History[edit]

The Vaghelas were a branch and feudatories of the Solanki Rajput, who ruled Gujarat from the 10th to the 13th centuries. The Solanki went into decline in the thirteenth century, and by 1243 the Vaghelas were firmly in control of Gujarat. Stone inscriptions at the "Dabhoi stone" dating 1253 CE, mention Lavana Prasad, a minister with Solanki king, Bhima II (r. 1178 - 1242 CE), and who later established his own independent dynasty. [2]


They restored stability to Gujarat for the latter half of the 13th century. They were based in the town of Dholka. Their dynasty ended with the defeat of Karnadeva Vaghela by Alauddin Khilji in 1299 CE, and the rule of the Delhi Sultanate.[3][1]

A number of temples were built during their reign by wealthy merchants, Vastupal and Tejapal who also served as ministers and generals, including one of Dilwara Temples at Mount Abu and temple at Mount Girnar.[4][5] In fact, Kirtikaumudi, the biography of Vastupal, written by Someswaradev (1179-1262), a royal priest, is also an important source of the history of the dynasty.[6]

Rulers[edit]

List of Vaghela kings:

  • Vīrdhavala (Visala) (c. 1243 - c. 1262)
  • Arjunadeva (Vishaldev) (c. 1262 - c. 1275)
  • Sarangadeva (c. 1275 - c. 1297)
  • Karandeva (II) (c. 1297-1304)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Educational Britannica Educational (2010). The Geography of India: Sacred and Historic Places. The Rosen Publishing Group. pp. 269–. ISBN 978-1-61530-202-4. Retrieved 24 July 2013. 
  2. ^ Ramkrishna T. Vyas; Umakant Premanand Shah (1995). Studies in Jaina Art and Iconography and Allied Subjects in Honour of Dr. U. P. Shah: Consciousness Manifest. Abhinav Publications. pp. 147–. ISBN 978-81-7017-316-8. Retrieved 24 July 2013. 
  3. ^ "Vaghela dynasty". Britannica.com. Retrieved July 24, 2013. 
  4. ^ Leonard Lipschutz (2000). Century-By-Century: A Summary of World History. iUniverse. pp. 64–. ISBN 978-1-4697-3415-6. Retrieved 24 July 2013. 
  5. ^ Kristi L. Wiley (2009). The A to Z of Jainism. Scarecrow Press. pp. 13–. ISBN 978-0-8108-6821-2. Retrieved 24 July 2013. 
  6. ^ Maurice Winternitz; Moritz Winternitz (1985). A History of Indian Literature. Motilal Banarsidass Publ. pp. 103–. ISBN 978-81-208-0056-4. Retrieved 24 July 2013. 

Bibliography[edit]