Valerie Daggett

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Valerie Daggett is a professor of bioengineering at the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington, United States. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California, San Francisco, advised by Irwin Kuntz and Peter Kollman, and subsequently held a postdoctoral position at Stanford University with Michael Levitt, a co-recipient of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.[1]

Her laboratory focuses on work in molecular dynamics simulations of proteins and other biomolecules. Daggett is well known for large-scale simulations of protein folding, unfolding, and native state dynamics through her dynameomics project.[2][3] In 2005, the Daggett laboratory was awarded a supercomputing grant by the U.S. Department of Energy, which was renewed for almost two million processor-hours in 2006;[4] the group has also participated in Microsoft Research high-performance computing projects.[5] Daggett was one of two UW scientists named 2015 American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering Fellows.[6]


  1. ^ Daggett, Valerie. "Daggett Research Group". Retrieved 10 February 2015. 
  2. ^ Doerr, Alison (2010). "A database of dynamics". Nature Methods 7 (6): 426. doi:10.1038/nmeth0610-426. 
  3. ^ Van Der Kamp, M. W.; Schaeffer, R. D.; Jonsson, A. L.; Scouras, A. D.; Simms, A. M.; Toofanny, R. D.; Benson, N. C.; Anderson, P. C.; Merkley, E. D.; Rysavy, S.; Bromley, D.; Beck, D. A. C.; Daggett, V. (2010). "Dynameomics: A Comprehensive Database of Protein Dynamics". Structure 18 (4): 423. doi:10.1016/j.str.2010.01.012. 
  4. ^ DOE press release on the awarding of INCITE grants. 22 Dec 2004. Access date 17 Jan 2007.
  5. ^ Microsoft Corporation. "GrayWulf Takes Byte Out of Data Overload". Microsoft Research. Retrieved 10 February 2015. 
  6. ^ Wright, Laura Elizabeth (26 January 2015). "Suzie Pun and Valerie Daggett elected AIMBE Fellows". University of Washington Department of Engineering. Retrieved 10 February 2015. 

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