Vanessa Roth

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Vanessa Roth is an American filmmaker who writes, produces and directs non-fiction films and heads up social issue reform efforts through storytelling. She has won a number of film awards for her works, including a 2008 Academy Award for Best Short Documentary for Freeheld, an Emmy Honors Award for Social Impact and a IDA Nomination for best doc series for her Netflix series, Daughters of Destiny (https://www.emmys.com/tags/daughters-destiny) (https://www.emmys.com/video/2018-television-academy-honors-recipient-daughters-destiny), an Alfred I duPont-Columbia award for Taken In: The Lives of America's Foster Children, Impact Doc Awards for Outstanding Achievement in filmmaking for The Girl and The Picture as well as two Sundance Special Jury Prizes, Cine Golden Eagles, Casey Medals and a MacArthur Grant. She is currently (2019) Directing the Untitled Mary J Blige Documentary feature for Amazon Studios. (https://deadline.com/2019/12/mary-j-blige-documentary-in-production-with-amazon-studios-eone-1202799370/)

Some of her award-winning films include Liberation Heroes: The Last Eyewitnesses, The Girl and the Picture, Freeheld, Close to Home, Aging Out, The Third Monday in October, 9/11’s Toxic Dust, No Tomorrow, The Other Side, American Teacher,[1] and The Texas Promise. She is also the executive producer, writer and director of Daughters of Destiny: The Journey of Shanti Bhavan - a 4 part Netflix Original documentary series released July 28, 2017.[2][3].

Personal life[edit]

She earned a master's degree in Social Work with a minor in Family Law from Columbia University. She lives in Shelter Island, NY and has three children. She is the daughter of Academy Award-Winning screenwriter Eric Roth [4] and archeologist Linda Roth.

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Teacher Salary Project
  2. ^ "Review: ‘Daughters of Destiny’ on Netflix Explores Caste Struggles in India", by Mike Hale, The New York Times, July 28, 2017. [Consulted 2 August 2018].
  3. ^ "In Daughters of Destiny, Educating the 'Untouchables'", by Jenna Marotta, Vogue, July 27, 2017. [Consulted 2 August 2018].
  4. ^ "Her father's daughter", Variety, February 15, 2008

External links[edit]