Vasupujya

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Vasupujya
12th Jain Tirthankara
Vasupujya
Venerated inJainism
PredecessorShreyansanatha
SuccessorVimalanatha
SymbolBuffalo[1]
Height70 bows (210 metres)[2]
Age7,200,000 years
ColorRed
Personal information
BornChampapur
DiedChampapur
Parents
  • Vasupujya (father)
  • Jaya (Vijaya) (mother)

Vasupujya Swami was the twelfth tirthankara in Jainism of the avasarpini (present age). According to Jain beliefs, he became a siddha, a liberated soul which has destroyed all of its karma. Vasupujya was born to King Vasupujya and Queen Jaya Devi at Champapuri in the Ikshvaku dynasty. His birth date was the fourteenth day of the Falgun Krishna month of the Indian calendar. He never married and remained a celibate. He attained Kevala Jnana within one month of Tapsya and Moksha at Champapuri, of North Bengal in India on the fourteenth day of the bright half of the month of Ashadh.

Biography[edit]

Vasupujya Swami was the 12th tirthankara in Jainism of the Avasarpini (present age).[3] According to Jain beliefs, he became a siddha, a liberated soul which has destroyed all of its karma. Vasupujya was born to King Vasupujya and Queen Jaya Devi at Champapuri in the Ikshvaku dynasty. His birth date was the fourteenth day of the Falgun Krishna month of the Indian calendar.[3] He never married and remained a celibate. He attained Kevala Jnana within one month of Tapsya and Moksha at Champapuri, of North Bengal in India on the fourteenth day of the bright half of the month of Ashadh.[4]

The second Vasudeva, Dwiprishtaha, was his devotee. He and his brother Baldeva Shrivijay conquered Prativasudeva Tark and brought his oppressive rule to an end. Shrivijay later joined the ascetic order of Lord Vasupujya.[4]

Temples[edit]

Statue[edit]

The tallest statue of Vasupujya, 31 feet in height, was inaugurated at Nathnagar Temple, Champapur, Bhagalpur, Bihar in 2014. The statue was constructed and donated by Smt Sona Devi Sethi Charitable Trust, based at Phulchand Sethi complex Dimapur.[5][6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tandon 2002, p. 44.
  2. ^ Sarasvati 1970, p. 444.
  3. ^ a b Tukol 1980, p. 31.
  4. ^ a b Jain 2009, p. 81.
  5. ^ "Deity gift from Nagaland", The Telegraph, 7 January 2014
  6. ^ Vasupujya

Sources[edit]