Vehicle vinyl wrap

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A vehicle vinyl wrap[1] describes the automotive aftermarket practice of completely or partially covering a vehicle's original paint with a vinyl wrap of a different color, and sometimes the same color with a differing finish like a gloss, matte or protective layer. Other terms used to refer to vehicle vinyl wrap are Car Wrap, Paint Wrap, Color Change Wrap, Vehicle Graphics, and Paint Protection Film.

History[edit]

Vehicle vinyl wrap and color change wraps grew in popularity out of the wrap advertising business. Wrap installers that performed advertising vinyls, began to offer accent and full vinyl wraps as a cosmetic enhancement. Vehicle owners, correspondingly drove demand and requested vinyl wraps that suited their desires. Rather than advertise a company or brand, vehicle owners wanted to change the color and finish of their vehicle for cosmetic or protective purposes. Manufacturers of vinyl wrap followed this trend by producing more colors and easier to install, durable materials.

One of the earliest cosmetic vinyl treatments dates to the 1950s and an aftermarket product by Newhouse Automotive Industries of Los Angeles, California.[2] Costs for DIY partial decorative (plaid or polka dot) vinyl treatments ranged from $10-$20.

The Newhouse Automotive ads described vinyl as "very latest automotive sensation:" vehicle wraps. The Newhouse ads began in 1954.

By 2017, color change vinyl wraps, paint color matching vinyl wraps, and overlaminates evolved to include complex and creative graphic designs and advanced colors. Metallic, chrome, color shifting and even vinyl wraps that match OEM paint code colors are available.

Color Change and "Paint Wrap" is a term used by wrap installers and refers to a full-color change, as if one were 'painting' car with vinyl wrap. Demand for color matching vinyl wrap has grown. Wrap is manufactured to match vehicle paint colors and metallics, as well as in colors used in print such as Pantone colors.

Technologies[edit]

Cast Vinyl is the most common material used in color change wraps. A cast vinyl starts as a liquid and is cast into a sheet or form and then processed through ovens, evaporating solvents in the liquid. When the solvents evaporate, the remainder is a solid film usually about 2 thousands of an inch thick. Cast films conform well to curved shapes and strongly retain their original, shape.[3] This durability of shape allows for predictability on application and in applying heat to relax the material back to its natural form after modest stretching. Cast vinyls are less prone to shrinkage because stress (such as extrusion as in calendered films) is not applied to the material during the manufacturing process.

At 2017, WrapsCon in Long Beach, CA, Justin Pate offered free training and product reviewing in his Wrap Institute booth with a tropical theme.
At 2017, WrapsCon in Long Beach, CA, Justin Pate offered free training and product reviewing in his Wrap Institute booth with a tropical theme.
WrapsCon 2017 in Long Beach CA. The Wrap Institute booth offering free instruction.
WrapsCon 2017 in Long Beach CA. The Wrap Institute booth offering free instruction.

Industry Events[edit]

  • Wrapscon is an event that takes place around the United States and brings together suppliers, distributors and professionals in the vehicle wrap business.[4]
  • SEMA is another event that showcases top talent and technologies in the vinyl wrap industry. Although not exclusively oriented toward vehicle color change or custom wraps, SEMA is host to many cars and customization demonstrations that feature vinyl wrapping.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "How to Vinyl-Wrap a Car". Popular Mechanics. 2013-02-12. Retrieved 2017-07-20. 
  2. ^ "As it turns out, vehicle wraps are anything but new". Autoblog. Retrieved 2017-07-18. 
  3. ^ SERVER. "Cast vs. Calendered Vinyl Films". www.signindustry.com. Retrieved 2017-07-18. 
  4. ^ "Wrapscon | THE NBM SHOW". thenbmshow.com. Retrieved 2017-07-19. 
  5. ^ "SEMA Show Highlights". SEMA Show | Las Vegas Convention Center | Nov 1 - Nov 4, 2016. Retrieved 2017-07-19.