Venezuela Defense of Human Rights and Civil Society Act of 2014

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Venezuela Defense of Human Rights and Civil Society Act of 2014
Great Seal of the United States
Full title A bill to impose targeted sanctions on persons responsible for violations of human rights of antigovernment protesters in Venezuela, to strengthen civil society in Venezuela, and for other purposes.
Introduced in 113th United States Congress
Introduced on March 13, 2014
Sponsored by Rep. Robert Menendez (D, NJ-13)
Number of co-sponsors 4
Legislative history
  • Introduced in the House as S. 2142 by Rep. Robert Menendez (D, NJ-13) on March 13, 2014
  • Committee consideration by: Senate Foreign Relations
  • Passed the Senate on December 7, 2014 (voice vote)
  • Passed the House on December 10, 2014 (voice vote)
  • Signed into law by President Barack Obama on December 18, 2014

The Venezuela Defense of Human Rights and Civil Society Act of 2014 (S. 2142) is a United States law used to impose targeted sanctions on certain individuals in Venezuela that were responsible for violations of human rights of antigovernment protesters during the 2014 Venezuelan protests.[1] The law is also used to strengthen civil society in Venezuela, and for other purposes.[1]

Procedural history[edit]

The bill was introduced by Senator Robert Menendez on March 13, 2014.[2] It was then passed by the Senate on December 7, 2014 and passed the House on December 10, 2014 to be signed into law by President Barack Obama. On December 18, 2014, President Obama signed the bill into law.[3]

Actions[edit]

On February 2, 2015, the United States Department of State imposed visa restrictions on current and former Venezuelan officials that were allegedly linked to presumed human rights abuses and political corruption.[4] The visa restrictions also included family members of those involved in the allegations, with the Department of State saying, "We are sending a clear message that human rights abusers, those who profit from public corruption, and their families are not welcome in the United States".[4]

March 2015[edit]

On March 9, 2015, President Obama ordered the United States Department of the Treasury to freeze property and assets of the following:[5]

  • Antonio José Benavides Torres - a commander in the Venezuelan armed forces and former leader of the Venezuelan National Guard.
  • Gustavo Enrique González López - Director General of SEBIN.
  • Justo José Noguera Pietri - former General Commander of Venezuela’s National Guard
  • Katherine Nayarith Haringhton Padron - a national-level prosecutor in Venezuela.
  • Manuel Eduardo Pérez Urdaneta - Director of the Bolivarian National Police
  • Manuel Gregorio Bernal Martínez - former Director General of SEBIN
  • Miguel Alcides Vivas Landino - Inspector General of the Venezuelan armed forces.

List of sanctioned individuals[edit]

Those listed for possible sanctions include:[6][7][8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "S.2142 - Venezuela Defense of Human Rights and Civil Society Act of 2014". Congress.gov. Retrieved 11 December 2014. 
  2. ^ "S.2142 - Venezuela Defense of Human Rights and Civil Society Act of 2014 - Summary". Congress.gov. Retrieved 11 December 2014. 
  3. ^ "OBAMA SIGNS BILL TO SANCTION VENEZUELAN OFFICIALS". Associated Press. Retrieved 18 December 2014. 
  4. ^ a b "U.S. slaps visa restrictions on current, former Venezuelan officials". Reuters. 2 February 2015. Retrieved 3 February 2015. 
  5. ^ Rhodan, Maya (9 March 2015). "White House Sanctions Seven Officials in Venezuela". Time. Retrieved 9 March 2015. 
  6. ^ "This is the first list of Venezuelan officials to be punished". La Patilla. 18 December 2014. Retrieved 19 December 2014. 
  7. ^ "Rubio Welcomes Signing Of Venezuela Sanctions Bill Into Law". Marco Rubio United States Senator for Florida. Retrieved 19 December 2014. 
  8. ^ "Senator Rubio Lists 23 Human Rights Violators That Should Be Sanctioned". Marco Rubio United States Senator for Florida. Retrieved 19 December 2014.