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Venom (Marvel Comics character)

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Venom
Web of Venom.png
Art by Clayton Crain
Publication information
PublisherMarvel Comics
First appearanceAs "The Alien Costume":
The Amazing Spider-Man #252 (May 1984)

As Venom:
Cameo: The Amazing Spider-Man #299 (April 1988)
Full appearance: The Amazing Spider-Man #300 (May 1988)
Created by"The Alien Costume":
Randy Schueller
Roger Stern
Tom DeFalco
Mike Zeck
Ron Frenz

Venom:
David Michelinie
Todd McFarlane
In-story information
Alter egoPeter Parker
Eddie Brock
Anne Weying
Angelo Fortunato
Mac Gargan
Flash Thompson
Doctor Octopus
Lee Price
Tel-Kar
SpeciesKlyntar
Team affiliationsSinister Six
Dark Avengers
Thunderbolts
Secret Avengers
Guardians of the Galaxy
New Warriors
S.H.I.E.L.D.
Symbiote Imperium
Notable aliasesSpider-Man
The Black Suit
Alien Costume
She-Venom
Agent Venom
Superior Venom
Abilities
  • All powers of the Symbiote's first human host, Spider-Man
  • Limited shapeshifting and camouflage
  • Symbiote's autonomous defense capabilities
  • Undetectable by Spider-Man's "Spider-sense"

Venom is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics, commonly in association with Spider-Man. The character is a sentient alien Symbiote with an amorphous, liquid-like form, who requires a host, usually human, to bond with for its survival. After bonding with a human host, the Symbiote bestows its enhanced powers upon the host. When the Venom Symbiote bonds with a human, that new dual-life form usually refers to itself as "Venom". The Symbiote was originally introduced as a living alien costume in The Amazing Spider-Man #252 (May 1984), with a full first appearance as Venom in The Amazing Spider-Man #300 (May 1988).

The Venom Symbiote's first human host was Spider-Man, who eventually separated himself from the creature in The Amazing Spider-Man #258 (November 1984)[1] (with a brief rejoining in Web of Spider-Man #1, five months later),[2] when he discovered its true nefarious nature. The Symbiote went on to merge with other hosts, most notably Eddie Brock, its second and most infamous host, with whom it first became Venom and one of Spider-Man's archenemies.[3]

Comics journalist and historian Mike Conroy writes of the character: "What started out as a replacement costume for Spider-Man turned into one of the Marvel web-slinger's greatest nightmares."[4][5] Venom was ranked as the 22nd Greatest Comic Book Villain of All Time in IGN's list of the top 100 comic villains.[6] IGN also ranked Mac Gargan's incarnation of Venom as #17 in their list of "The Top 50 Avengers",[7] while the Flash Thompson incarnation was ranked as #27.[8] The character was listed as #33 on Empire's 50 Greatest Comic Book Characters.[9]

Publication history

The original idea of a new costume for Spider-Man that would later become the character Venom was conceived by a Marvel Comics reader from Norridge, Illinois named Randy Schueller.[10] In 1982, Jim Shooter, Marvel's editor-in-chief at the time, sent Schueller a letter acknowledging Marvel's interest in the idea, which they ended up purchasing from him for $220.[11]

Shooter came up with the idea of switching Spider-Man to a black-and-white costume, possibly influenced by the intended costume design for the new Spider-Woman, with artist Mike Zeck designing the black-and-white costume.[12] Writer/artist John Byrne states on his website that the idea for a costume made of self-healing biological material was one he originated when he was the artist on Iron Fist to explain how that character's costume was constantly being torn and then apparently repaired by the next issue, explaining that he ended up not using the idea on that title, but that Roger Stern later asked him if he could use the idea for Spider-Man's alien costume. Stern in turn plotted the issue in which the costume first appeared but then left the title. It was writer Tom DeFalco and artist Ron Frenz who established that the costume was a sentient alien being that was vulnerable to high sonic energy during their run on The Amazing Spider-Man that preceded Michelinie's.[13]

The Symbiote was first introduced as Spider-man's new black costume in The Amazing Spider-Man #252 (May 1984) as part of a story called "Homecoming!" The story takes place after Spider-Man's return from the events of the miniseries Secret Wars, where he first obtains the black costume. The full first appearance of Venom is in The Amazing Spider-Man #300 (May 1988), after the Symbiote bonds with Eddie Brock.

Hosts

The Venom Symbiote bonds to Spider-Man in Secret Wars #8. Art by Mike Zeck.

Spider-Man (Peter Parker)

The story of how Spider-Man gets his new black costume is recounted in Marvel Super Heroes Secret Wars #8 (December 1984), in which writer Jim Shooter and artist Mike Zeck depicted the heroes and villains of the Marvel Universe transported to another planet called Battleworld by a being called the Beyonder. After Spider-Man's costume is ruined from battles with the villains, he is directed by Thor and the Hulk to a room at the heroes' base where they inform him a machine can read his thoughts and instantly fabricate any type of clothing. Choosing a machine he believes to be the correct one, Spider-Man causes a black sphere to appear before him, which spreads over his body, dissolving the tattered old costume and covering his body to form a new black and white costume. To Spider-Man's surprise, the costume can mimic street clothes and provides a seemingly inexhaustible and stronger supply of webbing.[14][15]

During their run on The Amazing Spider-Man, writer Tom DeFalco and artist Ron Frenz established that the costume was a sentient alien Symbiote that was vulnerable to both fire and high sonic energy. It was in that storyline that the costume would envelop Peter Parker while he slept, and go out at night to fight crime, leaving Parker inexplicably exhausted in the morning. Parker had the costume examined by Reed Richards, who discovered that it was alive, and when Parker realized it was trying to permanently bond to Parker's body, he rejected it, and it was subsequently contained by the Fantastic Four.[1][16] The Symbiote escaped[17] and bonded again to Parker, who used sound waves from a cathedral's church bell to repel it.[2] But the symbiote had grown an emotional attachment to Peter so he willingly left Peter's unconscious body and moved him to safety before disappearing.

Eddie Brock

David Michelinie would later write the backstory of Eddie Brock as the alien's new host that would become the villain Venom, using the events of Peter David's 1985 "Sin Eater" storyline in The Spectacular Spider-Man as a basis for Brock's origin.[12] Venom's existence was first indicated in Web of Spider-Man #18 (September 1986), when he shoved Peter Parker in front of a subway train without Parker's spider-sense warning him, though only Brock's hand was seen on-panel. The next indication of Venom's existence was in Web of Spider-Man #24 (March 1987), when Parker climbed out of a high story window to change into Spider-Man, but found a black arm coming through the window and grabbing him, again without being warned by his spider-sense. Venom made his cameo appearance on the last page of The Amazing Spider-Man #299 (April 1988), when he terrorized Parker's wife, Mary Jane Watson, and made his full appearance in The Amazing Spider-Man #300 (May 1988).[18]

Spider-Man would confront him in the following issue, when Brock reveals that he was a Daily Globe reporter who worked on the Sin-Eater case, and that his career was ruined when it was discovered that the man Brock announced as the Sin-Eater was a compulsive confessor. Forced to eke out a living writing lurid stories for venomous tabloids, Brock blamed Spider-Man for his predicament. He took up bodybuilding to reduce stress. It failed to do so, and Brock sank into a suicidal depression. Seeking solace at the church where Spider-Man repelled the Symbiote, the Symbiote—sensing Brock's hatred for Spider-Man—bonded with the disgraced reporter. Brock took on the name Venom in reference to the sensationalistic material he was forced to traffic in following his fall from grace.[19][20]

Over the years, as the Symbiote gained more intelligence and moved to additional human hosts, the name began to apply to the Symbiote as well as its hosts. As Venom, Brock fights Spider-Man many times, winning on several occasions. Venom repeatedly tries to kill Peter Parker/Spider-Man—both when the latter was in and out of costume. Thus Parker is forced to abandon his "black costume", which the Symbiote had been mimicking, after Venom confronts Parker's wife Mary Jane.[21]

Venom escapes from the supervillain prison, The Vault, to torment Spider-Man and his family.[22][23] The Symbiote is finally rendered comatose after being subdued by Styx's plague virus, and Eddie Brock is subsequently placed in Ryker's Island Prison.[24] When the Symbiote recovers and returns to free Brock, it leaves a spawn to bond with Brock's psychotic serial-killer cellmate Cletus Kasady, who becomes Carnage.[25] Meanwhile, Venom and Spider-Man fight on a deserted island, and Spider-Man strands Venom there after faking his own death.[26] Soon after, however, Spider-Man brings Venom back to New York City in order to stop Carnage's killing spree.[27] After being incarcerated once again, Venom is used to create five new Symbiotes, which are all paired with human hosts.[28]

Eddie Brock returns as Venom in the continuation of volume one in his eponymous series. Art from Venom #161 (February 2018) by Javier Garron.

As well as helping Eddie Brock to seek continued revenge against Spider-Man, the Symbiote also aids Brock in a sporadic career as a vigilante. He and the Symbiote occasionally share a desire to protect innocent people from harm, even if it means working side-by-side with the hated Spider-Man. This is especially true when Venom combats the entity he believes to be his spawn, Carnage. When Spider-Man helps Venom save Brock's ex-wife Anne Weying, the two form a temporary truce, though this falls apart after Weying's suicide.[29][30]

The Symbiote is temporarily stolen by U.S. Senator Steward Ward, who hopes to better understand his own alien infection by researching the Symbiote before it returns to Brock.[31] Now, however, it dominates its host, Brock, rather than vice versa.[32] Eventually, Eddie Brock and the Symbiote go their separate ways as the Symbiote grows tired of having a diseased host and Eddie rejects its growing bloodlust, leading him to sell the Symbiote at a super villain auction.

The creature that would become Venom was born to a race of extraterrestrial Symbiotes, which lived by possessing the bodies of other life-forms. The parasites would endow their victims with enhanced physical abilities, at the cost of fatally draining them of adrenaline.[volume & issue needed] According to the 1995 "Planet of the Symbiotes" storyline, the Venom Symbiote was deemed insane by its own race after it was discovered that it desired to commit to its host rather than use it up. The Symbiote was then imprisoned on Battleworld to ensure it did not pollute the species' gene pool.[volume & issue needed]

The symbiote bonds with its new host, Lee Price, launching volume 3 of the Venom comic book series. The series ran for six issues total (Nov. 2016-April 2017). Eddie Brock is able to regain the Venom symbiote at the conclusion of the series, returning the Venom comic book title to volume 1 with issue #150.[33]

Mac Gargan

The Venom Symbiote approaches Mac Gargan, the villain formerly known as Scorpion, and offered him new abilities as the second Venom.[34] Gargan bonded with the creature, which would later give him an extra edge as part of Norman Osborn's Sinister Twelve.[35] As the Avengers dealt with the rest of the Twelve, Spider-Man swiftly defeated Gargan, even with these additional powers, which Spider-Man suggests is attributed to the fact that Mac Gargan does not hate Spider-Man as much as Eddie Brock did.[36]

Mac Gargan as the fourth host and the second Venom

Gargan later became a member of a sub-group of the Thunderbolts,[37] which was drafted[38] by the Avengers to hunt down the members of the fugitive New Avengers. It was then revealed that he had been outfitted with electrical implants by the government to keep the Symbiote in check.[39]

When in the Venom persona, Gargan retained very little of his original personality and was controlled almost completely by the Symbiote, which drove him to cannibalism. When the Symbiote was dormant in his body, he expressed nausea and fear of the organism.[40] During a fight with "Anti-Venom" (Eddie Brock), he and his Symbiote were separated, and the Venom Symbiote was nearly destroyed. Blobs of it still existed in his bloodstream, however, so Osborn injected Gargan with a vaccine for Anti-Venom's healing powers, which restored the Symbiote by causing the remaining pieces of it to expand rapidly. Gargan dons a Scorpion battle armor over the Symbiote while it heals, causing him to become what Spider-Man calls "Ven-orpion" although when the Symbiote is fully restored it shatters the armor.[volume & issue needed]

After ingesting a chemical given to him by Norman Osborn, Venom transforms into a more human appearance similar to the Black-Suited Spider-Man. Osborn introduces him as The Amazing Spider-Man, a member of the Dark Avengers, while unveiling the team.[41] After the Siege of Asgard, Gargan and most of the Dark Avengers were taken into custody. While being held on the Raft, the Venom Symbiote was forcefully removed from him, ending his run as Venom.[42]

Flash Thompson

On December 9, 2010, Marvel Comics announced a new "black ops" Venom owned by the government. This new Venom was featured in a new series called Venom in March 2011. The birth of the new Venom can be seen in The Amazing Spider-Man #654 in February 2011.[43] On January 28, 2011, the identity of "black ops" Venom was revealed to be Flash Thompson.[44][45] Flash is hired by the government to be a special agent wearing the Venom Symbiote. Flash is only allowed to wear the suit for up to 48 hours, or risk a permanent bonding with the Symbiote. Along with the alien, Flash is equipped with a "Multi-Gun" designed to change into any type of gun Flash needs. The Government is also equipped with a "kill switch" designed to take Flash out if he loses control. Flash rejects the kill switch and later joins the Secret Avengers,[46] Thunderbolts,[47] Guardians of the Galaxy,[48] and even becomes appointed by the Klyntar a Space Knight.[49]

Lee Price

After being separated from Flash Thompson through unspecified means, the Venom symbiote happens upon a black market deal between Black Cat's gang and Tombstone's gang. He resorts to bonding with one of the men present, a discharged Army Ranger named Lee Price who was with Scorpion as part of Black Cat's gang. The weakened symbiote pleads with Price, attempting to convince him to become a hero like Thompson. Price ignores and overpowers it, intent on using it for personal gain as a new, wholly villainous Venom.[50]

Lee Price makes his way to Black Cat's hideout where Scorpion accuses him of botching the black market sale by causing the shoot-out. After having to keep the Venom symbiote from attacking Black Cat, Lee Price takes his leave from Black Cat's lair as Scorpion gets suspicious towards Lee. His departure is seen by some FBI Agents. Lee Price later gets attacked by Tombstone's minion Firebug. Upon defeating Firebug, an FBI Agent with a bazooka appears telling Lee Price that he is under arrest.[51]

Lee Price eventually loses the symbiote when Eddie Brock and Spider-Man take him down and he is arrested by the NYPD.[33]

While incarcerated at the New York Corrections Supermax Facility for Superhuman Incarceration, Lee Price is feared by most of the inmates and he even defeats three inmates in the prison's cafeteria when they try to kill him to boost their reputation. Lee swears to get out, reclaim the Venom symbiote, and plan revenge on those who have wronged him.[52] Lee Price is later visited by his lawyer who tells him that two of the inmates he defeated had died in the infirmary and that Venom has resurfaced upon it being revealed in the news.[53] At the courthouse, Lee Price's lawyer stated that Lee's actions as Venom were caused by the Venom symbiote while the opposing lawyer mentions about Venom still being at large. The judge then asked for some evidence to help with the trial. After the trial, Lee Price is released from prison and begins his plans to reclaim the Venom symbiote and take revenge on those who have wronged him.[54]

In Venom Inc., Lee Price steals the Mania symbiote from Andy and becomes Maniac. He uses the symbiote to infect the crime bosses and become a criminal kingpin, but he is defeated by Spider-Man, Venom, Black Cat and Agent Anti-Venom.[55]

Tel-Kar

It is revealed in Venom: First Host that Peter Parker is not Venom's first host. Venom's first host is actually a Kree soldier named Tel-Kar. The Kree, desiring to replicate Skrull shapeshifting abilities, obtain the newborn Venom, which had been outcast from the other symbiotes. Tel-Kar is recruited to be bonded to the newborn symbiote so that he can infiltrate the Skrull army. Tel-Kar's body is biologically altered so he can have full control over the symbiote's mind to the point of erasing its memories. Separated from Tel-Kar after his capture by the Skrulls, the symbiote goes on to be bonded to Spider-Man. [56] [57]

Tel-Kar escapes the Skrulls and wanders through the Galaxy until he hears of an agent from Earth called Flash Thompson with a black symbiote suit. Recognizing it as his symbiote, he goes to Earth to find it. Eddie Brock arrives with the symbiote and saves Tel-Kar from the Warbride Skrull M'Lanz, who had followed him. Angered by Venom's refusal to return to him, Te-Kar threatens to kill Venom's latest offspring. Acceding to Tel-Kar, Venom reunites with him and they go to a Skrull research base to get a Skrull bioweapon. Simultaneously, Eddie is bonded to the offspring calling itself Sleeper and allies with M'Lanz to stop Tel-Kar. During the ensuing battle, Tel-Kar concludes that he doesn't need Venom anymore and uses an electrified spear to detach himself from it. Later he is betrayed by the Kree Empire while Eddie escapes with Venom and M'Lanz with Sleeper. Tel-Kar, now furious, attempts to release the bioweapon on Earth. Sleeper bonds to Tel-Kar and lobotomizes him. Sleeper, now with Tel'Kar's body, wishes Eddie farewell and goes to explore the universe.[58]

Other hosts

There have been other, shorter term hosts for the symbiote.

Scarlet Spider (Ben Reilly)

In the Planet of the Symbiotes storyline, the symbiote was rejected by Eddie, causing it to release a powerful scream that attracts the other symbiotes to Earth. Subsequently the symbiote sees Scarlet Spider, (Ben Reilly) and takes the form of his hooded top attempting to bond to Ben mistaking him for Spider-man. When it was later discovered by Brock and Peter Parker, the symbiote returned to Eddie.

Anne Weying

Anne Weying, the bride of Venom

Anne Weying first appears in The Amazing Spider-Man #375. She is Eddie Brock's ex-wife and a successful lawyer. Weying assists Spider-Man by sharing some of Brock's history. Later, she follows Spider-Man to the amusement park where Venom had Peter's (fake) parents. She confronts Brock and manages to convince him to end his feud. After Sin-Eater shoots Ann as part of a crusade against social injustice, Ann becomes She-Venom when the Venom Symbiote temporarily bonds with her to save her life. She-Venom lashes out against the men who had hurt her, and Brock becomes afraid for her (and of her) and compels the Symbiote to return to him. Ann is left distraught at her actions while bonded. Later Ann is arrested on a false charge as part of a trap for Venom. She manages to warn Brock who sends the Symbiote to her, allowing her to become She-Venom and escape custody. Some time later, Ann, traumatized by her experiences with Venom and the Symbiote, commits suicide after seeing Spider-Man pass by her window in a black costume, believing it is Brock returning for her.[31]

Patricia Robertson

The story follows U.S. Army communication specialist Patricia Robertson.[59] During a supply run to an Ararat Corporation owned outpost she discovers everyone at the installation dead except for one scientist. It is revealed that the Ararat Corporation is run by an alien colony of miniature spider robots led by an entity named Bob, that have infiltrated the American government. The Ararat Corporation has cloned Venom to facilitate the extermination of humanity, but the clone ravages its hosts. The clone is responsible for the death of the outpost crew.[60]

Robertson finds an ally in the Suit, a mysterious individual made of the same miniature robots as Bob, revealed to have been accidentally brought to Earth by Reed Richards.[61] The Suit modifies Robertson while she is unconscious to allow her to control the clone if it bonds with her. The Suit sabotages Wolverine, the clones favored host, forcing it to bond with Robertson. One of Bob's agents convinces Robertston to kill the real Venom to save humanity, causing her to free the incarcerated Venom. She and Venom fight, but Venom escapes. Bob remotely deactivates the technology allowing Robertson to control the clone forcing her to rely on willpower. Later, Robertson and Venom again fight, and Venom absorbs the clone.[62] Venom decides to carry out the clone's mission given to it by the Ararat corporation. The series did not continue and the plot remained unresolved as of 2012. The Venom Symbiote would later regurgitate and expel the clone from its body, allowing it to bond with a teenager named Andrea "Andi" Benton. Taking the name Mania, Benton became Agent Venom's partner for a time.[63]

Angelo Fortunato

Angelo Fortunato first appeared in Marvel Knights Spider-Man #7 and was killed in issue #8. Angelo is the son of Don Fortunato, a prominent Mafia capo. His frail physique and shy attitude leave Angelo frequently bullied and humiliated by his father. Don attends a supervillain auction and purchases the Venom Symbiote from Brock for $100 million. Brock warns Angelo of the Symbiote, but Angelo rebuffs him, saying that he has nothing to lose.[64] After bonding with the Symbiote, Angelo discovers the secret identity of Spider-Man, and attempts to kill him to prove his worth. Spider-Man ultimately defeats Angelo and when he tries to escape, the Symbiote abandons Angelo for his cowardice while he is leaping between buildings, leaving him to fall to his death. Spider-Man tried to save him, but he ran out of webs.[65]

Ms. Marvel (Carol Danvers)

During the Siege of Asgard Mac Gargan with the symbiote was fighting Spider-Man and Ms. Marvel. When they separated Mac from Venom, the symbiote briefly bonded to Carol and started flying away while Venom sad that Ms. Marvel is its favourite superhero. But Carol gathered her powers and detached from the symbiote which rebonded to Mac.

Red Hulk (Thunder Bolt Ross)

When Red Hulk came crashing into to Flash's apartment so he can recruit him, the symbiote sensing Red Hulk as danger, briefly bonds to him so he doesn't any harm to Flash. Then when Red Hulk calms down, the symbiote went to Flash.

Superior Spider-Man (Doctor Octopus)

When Flash Thompson with the symbiote was infiltrating into the Crime Master's men, Superior Spider-Man came attacking the criminals who was then confronted by Agent Venom. Doc Ock thinking that Venom was still evil he attacked Flash with Web Shooters filled with burner fuel and in the process injured Flash. While Flash was recovering, Superior Spider-Man put the symbiote in a canister and gave Flash a pair of prosthetic legs. Then the symbiote broke out and instead of bonding to Flash it bonded to Superior Spider-Man since it was still connected to Peter's body. After bonding to the symbiote Otto called himself the Superior Venom and went solving crime in a much brutal way. Then Mary Jane called the Avengers to stop the Superior Venom. But the Avengers proved to be no match to Superior Venom since he had the abilities of Spider-Man powered by Venom with the mind of Doctor Octopus combined. In the fight Otto realizes that the symbiote was messing with his head and with the help Peter's couscousnes and Flash's who had arrived in an Iron Man armour separated Otto from Venom and returning to Flash.

Groot, Rocket Racoon and Drax

When Flash was part of the Guardians of the Galaxy he got separated from the symbiote and his team mates decided to send him to Earth. While traveling Groot accidentally bonds to the symbiote and started attacking the others. Then Rocket tried to save his friend, but the symbiote left Groot and bonded to him. Then he tried to convince them to leave "his" ship, but Drax grabbed Rocket by the tail and started bashing him to the walls until the symbiote bonded to Drax and defeated the whole team. Now the symbiote possessed Drax took control of the ship and went to a planet formed from symbiotes named Klyntar (later revealed to be Knull's cage) where the symbiote got purified and rebonded to Flash.

Mercurio the 4-D Man

Agent Venom as Venom Space Knight foils the Gramosian's attempts to steal resources from the home planets of the P'qui[66] and the Wugin,[67] and to acquire chemical weapons derived from the blood of kidnapped Vvexians.[68]

Mercurio forces a Ruu'lto named Pik Rollo, whose child he is holding hostage, to try and assassinate Agent Venom, but Rollo instead betrays Mercurio, and joins forces with Venom.[69] When the two lay siege to Mercurio's headquarters, he incapacitates and imprisons them, and separates the Venom symbiote from Flash Thompson.[70] Sensing the symbiote's suppressed bloodlust, Mercurio attempts to convince it to join him, but it instead frees and returns to Thompson. The reformed Agent Venom and his allies proceed to dismantle Mercurio's forces, but Mercurio himself escapes, and swears vengeance on both the symbiote and Thompson.[71]

A bout of temporary insanity that the Venom symbiote subsequently experiences is eventually discerned to have been caused by its brief fusion with Mercurio, whose evil had undone the mental "cleansing" that the creature had earlier undergone.[72]

Spider-Woman (Jessica Drew)

When Eddie encounters Spider-Woman, she attempts to take him into custody, in the belief that he is still a villain. After rendering him unconscious, the symbiote attacks Spider-Woman. After a struggle, the symbiote bonds to her, and shows her the life that Eddie has led, convincing her of his aspirations to do good.[73]

Powers and abilities

The Symbiote enhances the physical strength of its host. Art from the variant cover of Venom vol. 3, #1 (November 2016) by Clayton Crain.

Though it requires a living host in order to survive, the Venom symbiote has been shown to be adept at fending for itself independent of a host. The Symbiote is capable of shapeshifting abilities, including the ability to form spikes or expand its size,[74] as well as mimic the appearance of other humanoids after it has obtained a host. The organism can additionally use its shape-shifting abilities to conceal itself by altering its coloration or by becoming completely invisible. It also contains a small "dimensional aperture", allowing its hosts to carry items without adding mass to the costume. The Symbiote also exhibits telepathic abilities, primarily when it needs to communicate with its host.[citation needed]

Because of its contact with Spider-Man, the Symbiote grants all of its subsequent hosts that hero's powers and cannot be detected by his spider-sense. As Spider-Man's fighting style is partly dependent on his spider-sense, his effectiveness was somewhat hampered when he battled Eddie Brock. Retaining its memory from the time it was bonded with Spider-Man, Venom is also capable of producing webbing similar to Spider-Man's own variety created from itself.[19]

The Symbiote greatly enhances the physical strength of those it bonds with. Its hosts experience a vastly larger size and musculature. The Symbiote displays non-human teeth, which are very sharp, and commonly protrudes a long tongue from its mouth. Venom is depicted as being physically much bigger than Spider-Man, as well as having more brute strength.

Venom exhibits some immunities to the supernatural powers of others such as the Penance Stare of Ghost Rider or Spider-Man's extrasensory spider-sense.

Some incarnations of the Venom Symbiote have shown it able to replicate itself. This ability is shown in the 2005–2006 miniseries Spider-Man: Reign, when Venom recreates his own Symbiote to combat his loneliness.

The Venom Symbiote is vulnerable to fire and sonic waves, causing it great pain and exhaustion if it sustains enough exposure. It can sense and track all of its offspring Symbiotes except Carnage, who learned how to block this ability shortly after bonding with Cletus Kasady and confronting Venom/Eddie Brock for the first time.[27]

The Venom symbiote is shown to form giant Web-like dragon wings when it was in contact with Knull.

Other versions

As a fictional character, Venom has appeared in various adaptations, from comic books to films and television series. Each version of the work typically establishes its own continuity, and sometimes introduces parallel universes, to the point where distinct differences in the portrayal of the character can be identified. This article details various versions of Venom depicted in works including Marvel Comics' Ultimate universe and What If issues.

In other media

Television

Venom (Eddie Brock) in Spider-Man: The Animated Series standing before Dr. Ashley Kafka
  • Venom appeared in Spider-Man, with Spider-Man's version voiced by Christopher Daniel Barnes, and Eddie Brock's version voiced by Hank Azaria. At the end of "The Alien Costume: Part Two", Brock becomes Venom after Spider-Man rejects the Symbiote. At the end of "The Alien Costume: Part Three", Venom was defeated. Venom's last appearance was in Season Three, where he teams up with Spider-Man and Iron Man against Carnage, Dormammu and Baron Mordo.
  • The Eddie Brock incarnation of Venom appears as an antagonist in Spider-Man Unlimited, voiced by Brian Drummond.
  • Venom appears in The Spectacular Spider-Man, with Spider-Man's version voiced by Josh Keaton, and Eddie Brock's version voiced by Benjamin Diskin. In the episode "The Uncertainly Principle", the Symbiote arrives on Earth by stowing away on the space shuttle. After being rejected by Spider-Man, it bonds with Eddie in the episode "Intervention", and is ultimately defeated in the episode "Nature vs. Nurture". Venom reappeared in the Season Two episodes "First Steps", "Growing Pains" and "Identity Crisis", where he attempts to expose Spider-Man's secret identity but his plans are foiled.
  • Venom is a recurring character in Ultimate Spider-Man, with Harry Osborn voiced by Matt Lanter, and Goblin-Venom voiced by Steven Weber.[75] In the episode "Venom", Doctor Octopus creates the Venom Symbiote from a sample of Spider-Man's blood. After it escapes from its creators, it temporarily fuses with a number of characters: Flash Thompson, Nova, Power Man, Iron Fist and finally Spider-Man.[76] Harry bonds with the organism in the episode "Back in Black", gradually turning into the villain Venom, until Spider-Man electrifies the suit off of him. In the episode "Venomous", the Venom Symbiote takes control of Harry again but Spider-Man and the other heroes are able to free him thanks to an Anti-Venom formula created by Doctor Octopus. The Symbiote later appears in the episodes "Carnage", "Venom Bomb", "Second Chance" and "The Avenging Spider-Man".[77]
  • Venom appears in the summer 2013 animated special Phineas and Ferb: Mission Marvel, voiced by Danny Trejo.[78][79]
  • Venom appears in the Hulk and the Agents of S.M.A.S.H. episode "The Venom Inside."[80] Doctor Octopus creates a new version of the Venom Symbiote that gradually assimilates Skaar, She-Hulk, Red Hulk and finally the Hulk to help dominate but also to destroy Spider-Man. However, the Hulks and Spider-Man eventually manage to defeat the Venom Symbiote, although it is unknown if the Venom Symbiote is still alive.
  • Venom appears in Lego Marvel Super Heroes: Maximum Overload, voiced by Dee Bradley Baker.
  • Venom appears in Spider-Man. The Venom Symbiote first appeared in the episode "A Day in the Life" as the V-252 that was found by the space program and sent over to Horizon High for research.
  • The Venom Symbiote appears in the Avengers Assemble episode "The Immortal Weapon."[81] At the time when Beyonder formed Battleworld for his experiment, a satellite that crashed into K'un-Lun contained a vial holding a Venom Symbiote that escaped and found its way into where Iron Fist had imprisoned Dracula. The Venom Symbiote binding to Dracula enabled him to survive in the sunlight during one of his fights with Black Panther, Falcon, and Iron Fist. There was also a mentioning by Dracula that a far-off domain on Battleworld is filled with Symbiotes. With help of a K'un-Lun Dragon defeating the vampires, Iron Fist used his "iron fist" move to strike Dracula enough for the Symbiote to break off him causing Dracula to flee.
  • The Venom Symbiote appears in the Guardians of the Galaxy episode "Drive Me Carnage."[82] A sample of it was held at Horizon High and possessed Spider-Man during the Guardians of the Galaxy's fight with a Carnage-possessed Thanos.

Film

Venom's first appearance in a motion picture was originally planned for a titular film written by David S. Goyer and produced by New Line Cinema, in which Venom would have been portrayed as an antihero and Carnage as the antagonist. By 2007, the film rights to Venom had reverted to Sony Pictures.[83]

Spider-Man trilogy

Concept art for Venom in the feature film Spider-Man 3

Eddie Brock / Venom appears as the primary antagonist in the 2007 feature film Spider-Man 3, played by Topher Grace. In the film, the Symbiote, after being rejected by Peter Parker, joins with Brock after the rival freelance photographer is exposed by Parker to have used a fake photograph, which ruins him publicly. Venom seeks an alliance with Flint Marko / Sandman to kill Spider-Man, but is thwarted in his plans and killed by one of the New Goblin's pumpkin bombs.

In July 2007, Sony executive Avi Arad revealed a spin-off of Sam Raimi's Spider-Man trilogy focused on the Venom Symbiote was in the planning stages, with Jacob Aaron Estes commissioned to write a script, tentatively entitled "Venom".[84] In September 2008, Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick signed on to write the film after Estes' script was rejected,[85] while Gary Ross would direct.[86] Variety reported that Venom would become an anti-hero in the film, and Marvel Entertainment would produce the film.[87] The potential film was ultimately cancelled.

The Amazing Spider-Man series

The Venom Symbiote has a cameo appearance at the end of the 2014 feature film The Amazing Spider-Man 2 in the Oscorp building, in a scene which features Gustav Fiers / The Gentleman walking past many of Oscorp's technology and experiments, including Vulture's wings and the mechanical arms of Doctor Octopus. In the viral marketing campaign for The Amazing Spider-Man 2 an article by Eddie Brock (one of the most notable hosts of Venom) detailing the capture of Cletus Cassidy (who later went on to become Carnage) was featured, with Anne Weying, who in the comics became the Bride of Venom, being mentioned in another article; these articles coming from the fictional Marvel universe's The Daily Bugle.[88]

In March 2012, Josh Trank was in talks to direct a new Venom film as a part of The Amazing Spider-Man film series.[89] In December 2013, Sony officially announced two spin-offs of The Amazing Spider-Man film series, involving a Venom film, now known as Venom: Carnage, and Sinister Six, respectively, with the first to be written by Alex Kurtzman, Roberto Orci and Ed Solomon, with Kurtzman directing it.[90] In September 2014, Kurtzman stated that they had been considering different incarnations of the character, including Eddie Brock, Anne Weying, and Flash Thompson.[91] The movie, among the other spin-offs were cancelled prior to the studios' contract agreement with Marvel Studios.

Sony's Universe of Marvel Characters

Tom Hardy as Venom in the 2018 film

In March 2016, following the introduction of Spider-Man to the Marvel Cinematic Universe, it was announced that Sony was moving forward with a standalone film by hiring Dante Harper to write the script, and Arad, Matt Tolmach and Amy Pascal producing. The film was initially reported to have no connection to the Marvel Cinematic Universe, nor have any relation to Spider-Man, and that it would be set in its own continuity.[92][93][94] A year later, Sony announced that Venom would be released on October 5, 2018 with Scott Rosenberg and Jeff Pinkner signed on as screenwriters.[95] It was reported to be Rated R and be the first in a series of Spider-Man character-related spin-off films called "Sony's Marvel Universe".[96][97] In May 2017, Tom Hardy was announced to be cast as Eddie Brock / Venom, with Ruben Fleischer attached to direct.[98] Carlton Drake / Riot appeared as the film's primary antagonist, as did Anne Weying, Brock's ex-wife from the comics.[99][100] The film has been described by the film's director Ruben Fleischer to be taking inspiration from the works of David Cronenberg and John Carpenter. The supporting cast also consists of Riz Ahmed, Michelle Williams and Jenny Slate. Variety reported that Kelly Marcel would write the script with Pinkner and Rosenberg.[101] Filming officially began on October 23, 2017.[102] Venom was released in the United States on October 5, 2018 with a PG-13 rating.

Video games

Venom is a playable character and boss character in a number of video games across several platforms.

See also

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External links