Veolia Cargo

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Veolia Cargo
subsidiary
Industry Rail freight transportation
Fate sold to:
SNCF (incorporated into Captrain)
and
Eurotunnel (incorporated into Europorte)
Predecessor formerly branded as "Connex"
188 million euro (2008)[1]
Number of employees
~1200[1]
Parent Veolia transport
Divisions Veolia Cargo France
Veolia Cargo Benelux
Veolia Cargo Deutschland
Veolia Cargo Italia
Website www.veolia-cargo.com

Veolia Cargo was a European rail freight transportation company that operated mainly in France and Germany.

On 2 September 2009 the company was acquired by Eurotunnel and SNCF[1] the deal being finalised on 1 December 2009.[2]

History[edit]

Prior to the creation of the subsidiary company Veolia transport operated both freight and passenger trains. The acquisition of 50% of the shares in Dortmunder Eisenbahn in 2005 gave Veolia a significant rail freight transport presence in Germany; as Dortmunnder Eisenbahn operated trains for the industrial giant Thyssen-Krupp, as well as operating the port of Dortmund.[3]

Veolia cargo was set up as a branch of Veolia Transport in 2006.[3] Previously the rail freight operations had been done under the Connex brand as Connex Cargo Logistics.[4]

Operations in the Netherland also started in 2006 with a contract to transport coal from across the border Germany to a power plant in Rotterdam. Additionally in 2006 the company later started transporting bioethanol and organic oils (bio-diesel, soya oil) by train for Swiss company BioEnergy.[3]

In 2008 Veolia cargo acquired Rail4chem.[3][5][6]

The Italian division was founded in 2008 with the acquisition of C-Rail srl.[7]

At the time of takeover Veolia Cargo owned (or leased) 200 locomotives and 1,600 wagons, as well as having its own training centres and workshops.

Sale to SNCF and Eurotunnel[edit]

At the beginning of 2009 SNCF and Trenitalia were considered to be likely bidders for the business,[8] the sale of which would reduce Veolia; the parent organisation's debt.[9] In late 2009 the company was sold to SNCF and Eurotunnel.[1]

SNCF Geodis took over the business areas in Germany, the Netherlands and Italy;[1] from the 11th of January 2010 the parts of the company acquired by SNCF were rebranded as Captrain; a brand encompassing all SNCF's international rail freight operations, other freight operating companies owned by SNCF were also incorporated into the brand.[10][11]

Eurotunnel took over the French operations.[1] The subsidiaries Veolia Cargo France, Veolia Cargo Link and CFTA Cargo acquired by Eurotunnel are expected to be rebranded as Europorte France, Europorte Link and Europorte proximity and become part of its Europorte freight business. Socorail has not been announced as being rebranded.[12]

Organisational structure and subsidiaries[edit]

The company was organised into four regional organisations[3] which were built up mainly from acquisitions of pre-existing private rail companies.:

  • Veolia Cargo Benelux
    • Veolia Cargo Nederland BV
  • Veolia Cargo Deutschland[13]
    • Bayerische CargoBahn GmbH
    • Dortmunder Eisenbahn GmbH - primary steel and associated materials
    • Farge-Vegesacker Eisenbahn-Gesellschaft GmbH - railway infrastructure
    • Hörseltalbahn GmbH
    • Industriebahn-Gesellschaft Berlin GmbH
    • Regiobahn Bitterfeld Berlin GmbH - specialisation in transport of chemical and dangerous freight
    • TWE Bahnbetriebs GmbH
  • Veolia Cargo Italia
  • Veolia Cargo France[14]
    • Veolia Cargo France
    • CFTA Cargo
    • Socorail

Joint ventures[edit]

Veolia Cargo Link was formed as a joint venture between CMA CGM subsidiary Rail Link Europe (49%) and Veolia Cargo (51%) in 2006. The company operated intermodal container trains from the Port of Marseilles-Fos, until the joint venture was terminated in early 2009 due to lack of profitability.[15][16]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "SNCF and Eurotunnel acquire Veolia Cargo" (PDF). Geodis. 
  2. ^ "Veolia Cargo sale finalised". Railway Gazette. 2009-12-01. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Veolia Cargo (press kit) www.veolia-cargo.com[dead link]
  4. ^ Connex Cargo Logistics has changed its name to Veolia Cargo Deutschland to reflect its parent company's identity International Railway Journal, 7/2006 via findarticles.com
  5. ^ Veolia on track to take over Rail4chem vinamaso.net
  6. ^ Veolia to acquire Rail4Chem transportweekly.com
  7. ^ Italy www.veolia-cargo.com[dead link]
  8. ^ Italy's Trenitalia may bid for Veolia Cargo - Les Echos 18/5/2009 www.reuters.com
  9. ^ SNCF TO BUY OUT VEOLIA CARGO 14/5/2009, Matthieu Desiderio, en.transport-expertise.org
  10. ^ Captrain Deutschland presents new logo / A new brand of SNCF Geodis 11/02/2010 , www.veolia-cargo.de
  11. ^ Captrain brand to consolidate international freight operations 12/2/2010 , www.railwaygazette.com
  12. ^ Eurotunnel completes Veolia Cargo takeover James Faulkner 1/12/2009 www.ifw-net.com
  13. ^ Germany www.veolia-cargo.com[dead link]
  14. ^ France www.veolia-cargo.com[dead link]
  15. ^ "Veolia Transport : Cargo" (PDF), www.veolia.transport.cn, March 2007, Veolia Cargo Link, Rail Link Europe, subsidiary of Veolia Cargo and of CMA--CGM [..] and Veolia Transport, has launched at the end of 2006 .. combined rail transportation of marine containers, between major port terminals and the main economic regions. Veolia Cargo Link, a rail company (51% controlled by Veolia Transport and 49% by Rail Link), is specialized in transportation by rail of maritime containers 
  16. ^ "Veolia and CMA CGM part company", www.worldcargonews.com, 17 March 2009