Veranoa Hetet

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Veranoa Puketapu Hetet
Born1966
EducationTe Wananga o Raukawa Wellington Polytechnic, Te Whanau Paneke, The Open Polytechnic of New Zealand.
Known forWeaving

Veranoa Puketapu Hetet (born 1966) is a New Zealand weaver of Te Atiawa, Ngāti Tuwharetoa and Ngāti Maniapoto descent.

Family[edit]

Veranoa Hetet’s mother was master weaver, Erenora Puketapu-Hetet and her father is master carver Rangi Hetet.[1] She attributes her knowledge of Māori arts to her upbringing and family. Her great-grandmother was Dame Rangimarie Hetet and her great aunt was Diggeress Te Kanawa.[2]

Veranoa is married to carver Sam Hauwaho. They have five children.[3]

Teaching[edit]

Since 1996 Hetet has taught weaving at tertiary institutions such as Te Wananga o Raukawa, Wellington Polytechnic, Te Whanau Paneke, and The Open Polytechnic of New Zealand. Veranoa is based in Waiwhetū, Lower Hutt where she continues to teach from The Hetet Studios.[4]

Veranoa teaches weaving online for The Hetet School of Maori Art

In 2012 Hetet and her group of weavers Te Roopu Mīro were weavers in residence for the exhibition Kahu Ora at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa.[5] In a previous discussion with Awhina Tamarapa, the curator of Kuhu Ora, Hetet describes her passion for learning, 'Every time you learn a technique, it opens up the possibilities even more. So the more you’re exposed to, the more possibilities there are for creating things'.[1]

Recognition[edit]

Hetet has received funding from Creative New Zealand for the development of new works and travel.[6] In 2014 she received a substantial arts grant to produce works for an exhibition at The Dowse Art Museum.[7] She has exhibited and travelled widely, including a 2014 one-month residency on St Helena, researching and teaching about extracting muka from the flax which has grown on the island since the mid-1900s.[8]

Her work has been exhibited at The Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, The Dowse Art Museum, City Gallery Wellington, Waikato Museum and Puke Ariki.[9][10][11][12][13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Smith, Huhana; Tamarapa, Awhina (2002). Taiāwhio: Conversations with Contemporary Māori Artists. Wellington: Te Papa Press. ISBN 0-909010-86-2.
  2. ^ Tamarapa, Awhina. "Kahu Ora Weaver: Te Roopu Mīro". Te Papa Tongarewa. Retrieved 29 January 2015.
  3. ^ "Weaving Through Life". New Zealand Women's Weekly. 8 April 2019. pp. 32–33.
  4. ^ "Veranoa Hetet". Toi Māori Aotearoa. Retrieved 29 January 2015.
  5. ^ "Kahu Ora". Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa. Retrieved 25 October 2016.
  6. ^ "Who got Funded 2011". Creative New Zealand. Retrieved 29 January 2015.
  7. ^ "Funding round: Arts Grant". Creative New Zealand. Retrieved 29 January 2015.
  8. ^ Edwards, Simon. "Veranoa weaves her way to St Helena". The Dominion Post. Retrieved 29 January 2015.
  9. ^ "Collections Online". Te Papa Tongarewa. Retrieved 29 January 2015.
  10. ^ "Local Knowledge". The Dowse Art Museum. Retrieved 29 January 2015.
  11. ^ "Precious Cargo". Tim Wigmore. Retrieved 29 January 2015.
  12. ^ "Ngā Uri Whakatipu". Waikato Museum. Retrieved 29 January 2015.
  13. ^ "Call of Taranaki". Puke Ariki. Retrieved 29 January 2015.

External links[edit]