Verdant universities

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The verdant universities are an informal group of Australian universities.[citation needed] They comprise universities founded in the 1960s and 70s and are sometimes called 'gumtree' universities.[1][dubious ] These universities were established in their state capitals, often next to native bush land (now nature reserves), and have lush vegetative campuses – which the naming 'verdant' refers to.

They are predominantly the second or third established university in their state; the only exception is Macquarie, which is the third university in Sydney, but the fourth university in New South Wales.

University Location State Established
Flinders University Adelaide SA 1966
Griffith University Brisbane QLD 1971
La Trobe University Melbourne VIC 1964
Macquarie University Sydney NSW 1964
Murdoch University Perth WA 1973

La Trobe University takes “verdant” a step further by the fact that it owns a 28-hectare wildlife sanctuary in addition to managing the Gresswell Hill Nature Conservation Reserve, situated north of the Melbourne campus.[2][3]

The verdant universities were part of a broader effort to expand and reform tertiary education in Australia based on similar reforms that led to the creation of the plate glass universities group in the United Kingdom.[1] All of these universities went on to form Innovative Research Universities in 2003.[1]

Potential verdants[edit]

While these five are considered the "main verdants" as they have the most in common, there are other universities that have been labelled as a verdant or gumtree university.[4][5] These include:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Types of Australian universities". www.academia.edu. Retrieved 2015-10-09.
  2. ^ "History of the area, La Trobe Wildlife Sanctuary, La Trobe University". www.latrobe.edu.au. Retrieved 2016-01-10.
  3. ^ "About the Sanctuary, La Trobe Wildlife Sanctuary, La Trobe University". www.latrobe.edu.au. Retrieved 2016-01-10.
  4. ^ "Types of Australian universities". www.academia.edu. Retrieved 2016-01-12.
  5. ^ Rowbotham, Jill (21 August 2012). "Universities' staff half casual: new data". The Australian. Retrieved 12 January 2016.