Vermio Mountains

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Vermio
Βέρμιο
Vermio is located in Greece
Vermio
Vermio
Location in Greece
Highest point
Elevation 2,065 m (6,775 ft) [1]
Coordinates 40°37′26″N 21°56′33″E / 40.62389°N 21.94250°E / 40.62389; 21.94250Coordinates: 40°37′26″N 21°56′33″E / 40.62389°N 21.94250°E / 40.62389; 21.94250
Geography
Location Imathia, Greece

The Vermio Mountains (Greek: Βέρμιο), the ancient Bermion (Greek: Βέρμιον), is a mountain range in northern Greece. It lies between the Imathia Regional Unit of the Central Macedonia Region and the Kozani Regional Unit of the Western Macedonia Region. The range is west of the plain of Kambania. The town of Veria, which is the capital of Imathia, is built οn the foot of these mountains. The highest point in the range is the peak Chamiti (Greek: Χαμίτη), 2,065 metres (6,775 ft) elevation, west of Naousa.

The Vermion Mountains are the site of ski resorts such as Seli and Tria Pente Pigadia.

Mentioned in antiquity by Pliny,[2] Strabo,[3]Stephen of Byzantium,[4] Hierocles,[5] Ptolemy,[6] and Thucydides[7] and Herodotus.[8][9] In classical times the mountain was though by Herodotus to be impassible and according to tradition, paradise was to be held on the other side. During Hellenistic times was an internal boundary of the Macedonian state.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Oreivatein list of mountain peaks". Archived from the original on October 16, 2013. Retrieved March 22, 2012. 
  2. ^ Pliny the Elder, Natural History IV.10
  3. ^ Strabo VII.26.
  4. ^ John Anthony Cramer, A geographical and historical description of ancient Greece (1828) p233.
  5. ^ John Anthony Cramer, A geographical and historical description of ancient Greece (1828)p233.
  6. ^ Ptol. iii. 12
  7. ^ George Grote, History of Greece: I. Legendary Greece. II. Grecian History to the Reign of Peisistratus at Athens, Volume 6 (J. Murray, 1854) p98-99.
  8. ^ Fitz Hugh Ludlow, David M. Gross , The Annotated Hasheesh Eater (David M Gross, 4 Oct. 2007) p95.
  9. ^ George Grote, A History of Greece: From the Earliest Period to the Close of the Generation Contemporary with Alexander the Great, Volume 4 (J. Murray, 1862) p205-206.
  10. ^ John Anthony Cramer, A geographical and historical description of ancient Greece (1828) p192.

External links[edit]