Vermont Law Review

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Vermont Law Review
Cover
DisciplineLaw
LanguageEnglish
Edited byDiarra A. Raymond, Lorentz Hansen
Publication details
History1976–present[1]
Publisher
Vermont Law School (United States)
FrequencyQuarterly[2]
Standard abbreviations
BluebookVt. L. Rev.
ISO 4Vt. Law Rev.
Indexing
ISSN0145-2908
LCCN76649668
OCLC no.60356283
Links

The Vermont Law Review is a law review edited and published by students at Vermont Law School.[3] The journal primarily publishes scholarly articles and student notes.[2] It is one of two journals published by the school, alongside the Vermont Journal of Environmental Law. It was founded by Vermont State Superior Court Judge Mary Miles-Teachout in 1976.[1]

The Law Review is published quarterly.[2] It hosts an annual symposium, each focusing on discussion of a timely legal issue, often covering environmental or Vermont-specific law.[4]

Notable Contributors[edit]

  • David Orgon Coolidge, Beyond Baker: The Case for a Vermont Marriage Amendment, 25 Vt. L. Rev. 61 (2000).
  • Robin Kundis Craig, Adapting to Climate Change: The Potential Role of State Common-Law Public Trust Doctrines, 34 Vt. L. Rev. 781 (2010).
  • Nicole Stelle Garnett, Justice Scalia's Rule of Law and Law of Takings, 41 Vt. Law Rev. 717 (2017).
  • Denise R. Johnson, Reflections on the Bundle of Rights, 32 Vt. L. Rev. 247 (2007).
  • Ellen Podgor, “What Kind of a Mad Prosecutor" Brought Us This White-Collar Case?, 41 Vt. L. Rev. 521 (2017).
  • Frank Pommersheim, Tribal Court Jurisprudence: A Snapshot from the Field, 21 Vt. L. Rev. 7 (1996).
  • George P. Smith II, Re-Validating the Doctrine of Anticipatory Nuisance, 29 Vt. L. Rev. 687 (2005).
  • David M. Smolin, Child Laundering as Exploitation: Applying Anti-Trafficking Norms to Intercountry Adoption under the Coming Hague Regime, 32 Vt. L. Rev. 1 (2007).
  • Cass Sunstein, Some Effects of Moral Indignation on Law, 33 Vt. L. Rev. 405 (2009).
  • Steven M. Wise, Hardly a Revolution-The Eligibility of Nonhuman Animals for Dignity-Rights in a Liberal Democracy, 22 Vt. L. Rev. 793 (1998).
  • Mary Christina Wood, The Tribal Property Right to Wildlife Capital (Part II): Asserting a Sovereign Servitude to Protect Habitat of Imperiled Species, 25 Vt. L. Rev. 355 (2001).

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Teachout, Mary M. (1995). "Vermont Law Review Celebrates 20 Years". Vermont Law Review. 20 (1): 1–3.
  2. ^ a b c "Vermont Law Review: About Us". Retrieved May 4, 2016.
  3. ^ "Masthead - Vermont Law Review". Vermont Law Review. Retrieved October 13, 2018.
  4. ^ "Vermont Law Review: Previous Symposia". Retrieved May 4, 2016.

External links[edit]