Vice President of the Presidency of Yugoslavia

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The office of the Vice President of the Presidency of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia existed from the enactment of constitutional amendments establishing the position in 1971 until the dissolution of the country by 1992.

A collective presidency existed in Yugoslavia since amendments to the constitution in 1971.[1] The amendments established the roles of President and Vice President within the collective Presidency which would rotate between individual republics and provinces on an annual basis. However, it also defined a separate title of President of the Republic which could be conferred by the Federal Assembly unto Josip Broz Tito who would automatically preside over the Presidency as well (and thus delay the implementation of the President of the Presidency role). Therefore, the launch of the Vice Presidency of the Presidency in 1971 would be the first to carry out a rotation system. Krste Crvenkovski of SR Macedonia was the first to hold the office. The subsequent order after SR Macedonia was SR Bosnia and Herzegovina, SR Slovenia, SR Serbia, SR Croatia, SR Montenegro, SAP Vojvodina, and SAP Kosovo.

In 1974 a new Constitution was adopted which reaffirmed the collective federal presidency consisting of representatives of the six republics, the two autonomous provinces within Serbia and (until 1988) the President of the League of Communists. The 1974 constitution affirmed Josip Broz Tito with an unlimited mandate which ensured the new office of President of the Presidency would not come into effect until after his death.[2] The first President of the Presidency was to be the then standing Vice President of the Presidency.[2] When Broz died on 4 May 1980, the then Vice President of the Presidency Lazar Koliševski acceded to the role of President of the Presidency. Subsequent to this the role of President of the Presidency would rotate on an annual basis with each President serving as Vice President the year prior.

No. Picture Name
(Born–Died)
Term of Office Political Party Representing
1 Krste Crvenkovski, slika.jpg Krste Crvenkovski
(1921–2001)[3]
29 July 1971 1 August 1972 League of Communists of Yugoslavia Macedonia
2 Ratomir Dugonjić.jpg Ratomir Dugonjić
(1916–1987)[3]
1 August 1972 June 1973 League of Communists of Yugoslavia Bosnia and Herzegovina
3 Mitja Ribičič.jpg Mitja Ribičič
(1919–2013)[3]
June 1973 16 May 1974 League of Communists of Yugoslavia Slovenia
4 Petar Stambolić 1958.jpg Petar Stambolić
(1912–2007)[4]
16 May 1974 15 May 1975 League of Communists of Yugoslavia Serbia
5 Vladimir Bakarić (1).jpg Vladimir Bakarić
(1912–1983)
15 May 1975 15 May 1976 League of Communists of Yugoslavia Croatia
6 No image.png Vidoje Žarković
(1927–2000)
15 May 1976 15 May 1977 League of Communists of Yugoslavia Montenegro
7 Stevan Doronjski.jpg Stevan Doronjski
(1919–1981)
15 May 1977 15 May 1978 League of Communists of Yugoslavia SAP Vojvodina
8 Fadil Hoxha, commander of Kosovo partisans.jpg Fadil Hoxha
(1916–2001)[5]
15 May 1978 15 May 1979 League of Communists of Yugoslavia SAP Kosovo
9 Lazar Kolishevski left.jpg Lazar Koliševski
(1914–2000)
15 May 1979 4 May 1980 League of Communists of Yugoslavia Macedonia
10 Cvijetin Mijatović.jpg Cvijetin Mijatović
(1913–1992)[6]
4 May 1980 15 May 1980 League of Communists of Yugoslavia Bosnia and Herzegovina
11 Sergej Kraigher 1969.jpg Sergej Kraigher
(1914–2001)[7]
15 May 1980 15 May 1981 League of Communists of Yugoslavia Slovenia
(4) Petar Stambolić 1958.jpg Petar Stambolić
(1912–2007)[7]
15 May 1981 15 May 1982 League of Communists of Yugoslavia Serbia
(5) Vladimir Bakarić (1).jpg Vladimir Bakarić
(1912–1983)[8]
15 May 1982 16 January 1983 League of Communists of Yugoslavia Croatia
12 Mika Špiljak.jpg Mika Špiljak
(1916–2007)[9]
January 1983 15 May 1983 League of Communists of Yugoslavia Croatia
(6) No image.png Vidoje Žarković
(1927–2000)
15 May 1983 15 May 1984 League of Communists of Yugoslavia Montenegro
13 Radovan Vlajković.jpg Radovan Vlajković
(1922–2001)
15 May 1984 15 May 1985 League of Communists of Yugoslavia SAP Vojvodina
14 No image.png Sinan Hasani
(1922–2010)
15 May 1985 15 May 1986 League of Communists of Yugoslavia SAP Kosovo
15 No image.png Lazar Mojsov
(1920–2011)[10]
15 May 1986 15 May 1987 League of Communists of Yugoslavia Macedonia
16 No image.png Hamdija Pozderac
(1924–1988)
15 May 1987 September 1987 League of Communists of Yugoslavia Bosnia and Herzegovina
17 No image.png Raif Dizdarević
(1926– )
September 1987 15 May 1988 League of Communists of Yugoslavia Bosnia and Herzegovina
18 Stane Dolanc.JPG Stane Dolanc
(1925–1999)[11]
15 May 1988 15 May 1989 League of Communists of Yugoslavia Slovenia
19 Borisav Jovic cropped.jpg Borisav Jović
(1928– )
15 May 1989 15 May 1990 League of Communists of Yugoslavia Serbia
20 No image.png Stipe Šuvar
(1936–2004)
15 May 1990 August 1990 League of Communists of Yugoslavia Croatia
21 Mesic crop.jpg Stjepan Mesić
(1934– )
August 1990 15 May 1991 Croatian Democratic Union Croatia
22 No image.png Branko Kostić
(1939– )
15 May 1991 December 1991 Democratic Party of Socialists of Montenegro Montenegro

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Službeni list Socijalističke Federativne Republike Jugoslavije". XXVII (29). Belgrade. 8 July 1971.
  2. ^ a b "Službeni list Socijalističke Federativne Republike Jugoslavije". XXX (9). Belgrade. 21 February 1974.
  3. ^ a b c Yusoslavia's New Constitution: Part One Archived May 28, 2012, at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ Yugoslavia 1974 Archived March 9, 2016, at the Wayback Machine
  5. ^ An Albanian Elected As Yugoslavia's State Vice-President Archived March 26, 2012, at the Wayback Machine
  6. ^ Mijatovic: President of Yugoslavia's Collective State Leadership Archived March 26, 2012, at the Wayback Machine
  7. ^ a b Sergej Kraigher - Yugoslavia's New State President Archived March 26, 2012, at the Wayback Machine
  8. ^ Yugoslav Vice-President Bakaric Dies Archived March 26, 2012, at the Wayback Machine
  9. ^ Yugoslavia's New State Presidency Archived May 25, 2012, at the Wayback Machine
  10. ^ League of Communists of Yugoslavia (LCY) Archived February 25, 2010, at the Wayback Machine
  11. ^ East European Leadership List[permanent dead link]