Viceroy of Kush

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Viceroy of Kush in hieroglyphs
sw zA n k
S
T14 N25

Sa-nisut-n-Kush
Sꜣ-nswt-n-Kꜣš
King's Son of Kush
Amenhotep called Huy King's Son of Kush under Pharaoh Tutankhamun

The Kingdom of Kush based in Lower Nubia was a province of Ancient Egypt from the 16th century BCE to eleventh century BCE. During this period, the polity was ruled by a viceroy who reported directly to the Egyptian Pharaoh. It is believed that the Egyptian 25th Dynasty were descendants of these viceroys, and so were the dynasties that ruled independent Kush until the fourth century CE.

List of Viceroys[edit]

Below is a list of viceroys mainly based on a list assembled by George Reisner.

Name Dynasty King (Pharaoh) Comment
Ahmose called Si-Tayit Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt Ahmose I [1] Possibly the first Viceroy.
Ahmose called Turo Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt Amenhotep I and Thutmose I Son of Ahmose called Si-Tayit
Seni Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt Thutmose I and Thutmose II
Penre Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt Hatshepsut
Inebny called Amenemnekhu Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt Hatshepsut and Thutmose III First attested in year 18, and serving until about year 22.
Nehi Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt Thutmose III Attested in year 22 or 23 of Tuthmosis III.
Usersatet Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt Amenhotep II
Amenhotep Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt Thutmose IV and Amenhotep III
Merymose Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt Amenhotep III
Tuthmosis Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt Akhenaten
Amenhotep called Huy Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt Tutankhamun Buried in TT40
Paser I Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt Ay and Horemheb Son of the Viceroy Paser I
Amenemopet Nineteenth Dynasty of Egypt Seti I and Ramesses II Son of Paser and grandson of Amenhotep Huy
Yuny Nineteenth Dynasty of Egypt Ramesses II Served as Head of the stable under Sety I and was later promoted to Viceroy.[2]
Heqanakht Nineteenth Dynasty of Egypt Ramesses II
Paser II Nineteenth Dynasty of Egypt Ramesses II Son of the High Priest of Min and Isis named Minmose. Related to the family of Parennefer called Wennefer.
Huy Nineteenth Dynasty of Egypt Ramesses II[3] He may have served either before or after Setau. Huy was also Mayor of Tjarw and a royal messenger to the Hatti. According to an inscription, he escorted Queen Maathorneferure from Hatti to Egypt.
Setau Nineteenth Dynasty of Egypt Ramesses II
Anhotep Nineteenth Dynasty of Egypt Ramesses II[3] Buried in TT300.
Mernudjem Nineteenth Dynasty of Egypt possibly a Viceroy under Ramesses II[3]
Khaemtir Nineteenth Dynasty of Egypt Merneptah [4]
Messuy Nineteenth Dynasty of Egypt Merneptah, perhaps Amenmesse, and Seti II
Seti Nineteenth Dynasty of Egypt Siptah
Hori I Twentieth Dynasty of Egypt Setnakhte Son of Kama.
Hori II Twentieth Dynasty of Egypt Ramesses III and Ramesses IV Son of Hori I.
Siese Twentieth Dynasty of Egypt Ramesses VI
Nahihor Twentieth Dynasty of Egypt Ramesses VII and perhaps Ramesses VIII
Wentawat Twentieth Dynasty of Egypt Ramesses IX Son of Nahihor
Ramessesnakht Twentieth Dynasty of Egypt Ramesses IX[5] Son of Wentawat.
Pinehesy Twentieth Dynasty of Egypt Ramesses XI Played a role in suppressing the High Priest of Amun Amenhotep.
Setmose Twentieth Dynasty of Egypt Ramesses XI[6]
Piankh Twentieth Dynasty of Egypt Ramesses XI Piankh was also the High Priest of Amun.
Herihor Twentieth Dynasty of Egypt Ramesses XI Played a role in ousting Pinehesy from office.
Akheperre Twenty-first Dynasty of Egypt Menkheperre The el-Hibeh archive mentions Akheperre who is a Fourth Priest of Amun and a Viceroy of Kush.[7]
Neskhons Twenty-first Dynasty of Egypt Siamun Daughter of Smendes II and Queen Takhentdjehuti, and wife of the HIgh Priest of Amun Pinedjem II. Buried in the cache in DB320
Pamiu I Twenty-third Dynasty of Egypt Osorkon III The title of Viceroy is attested on the coffins of his grandsons.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Edwards, The Cambridge ancient history, Volumes 1-3, 2000, pg 299 and 348
  2. ^ The Viceroys of Ethiopia (II) by George A. Reisner The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology, Vol. 6, No. 1. (Jan., 1920), pp. 73-88.
  3. ^ a b c Kitchen, K.A., Ramesside Inscriptions, Translated & Annotated, Translations, Volume III, Blackwell Publishers, 1996
  4. ^ Dodson, Poisoned Legacy: The Fall of the Nineteenth Egyptian Dynasty, American University in Cairo Press, 2010
  5. ^ P. Pamminger, Göttinger Miszellen 137 (1993), 79-86
  6. ^ Briant Bohleke, An Ex Voto of the Previously Unrecognized Viceroy Setmose, Göttinger Miszellen 85 (1985), 13-24
  7. ^ a b Gerard P.F. Broekman, The Leading Theban Priests of Amun and their Families under Libyan Rule, The Journal of Egyptian Archaeology, Vol. 96 (2010), pp. 125-148

Further reading[edit]

  • George A. Reisner, The Viceroys of Ethiopia, JEA 6 (1920), 28-55