Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000

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The Trafficking Victims Protection Act
Great Seal of the United States
Other short titles William Wilberforce Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act
Long title An Act
To combat trafficking in persons, especially into the sex trade, slavery, and involuntary servitude, to reauthorize certain Federal programs to prevent violence against women, and for other purposes.
Enacted by the 106th United States Congress
Effective October 28, 2000
Codification
Acts amended 2003, 2006, 2008
Legislative history

The Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) is a federal statute passed into law in 2000 by the U.S. Congress and signed by President Clinton. The law was later reauthorized by Presidents Bush and Obama. The TVPA has the ability to authorize protections for undocumented immigrants who are victims of severe forms of trafficking [1]

History[edit]

The Trafficking Victims Protection Act was subsequently renewed in 2003, 2006, 2008 (when it was renamed the William Wilberforce Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2008). The law lapsed in 2011. In 2013, the entirety of the Trafficking Victims Protection was attached as an amendment to the Violence Against Women Act and passed.[2] There are two stipulations an applicant has to meet in order to receive the benefits of the T-Visa. First, a victim of trafficking must prove/admit to being a victim of a severe form of trafficking and second must be a part of the prosecution of his or her trafficker. This law does not apply to immigrants seeking admission to the United States for other immigration purposes.

Since the law requires the applicant to become part of the prosecution of his or her trafficker, trafficked persons may be fearful of retaliation upon the self or the family and thus serves as a major deterrent to individuals even considering application. The law contains provisions for protection of those who are categorized as victims of human trafficking, primarily for sex, smuggling, and forced labor forms of exploitation.

The TVPA allowed for the establishment of the Department of State's Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, which coordinates with foreign governments to protect trafficking victims, prevent trafficking, and prosecute traffickers.[3]

Amendments[edit]

Proposed[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Siskin, Alison; Wyler, Liana Sun (Feb 2013). "Trafficking in Persons: US Policy and Issues for Congress". Congressional Research Service. 
  2. ^ "Breaking News: Violence Against Women Act & Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorisation Act Passed". Not For Sale. Retrieved 23 May 2013. 
  3. ^ "About Us." U.S. Department of State. Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, n.d. Web. 01 Apr. 2013.
  4. ^ a b "H.R. 3530 - Summary". United States Congress. Retrieved 19 May 2014. 
  5. ^ Marcos, Cristina (16 May 2014). "Next week: Lawmakers to debate defense and drones". The Hill. Retrieved 19 May 2014. 
  6. ^ Marcos, Cristina (24 July 2014). "House passes bills to prevent human trafficking". The Hill. Retrieved 24 July 2014. 
  7. ^ "H.R. 4449 - Summary". United States Congress. Retrieved 24 July 2014. 

External links[edit]