Victoria Jackson

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This article is about the comedian and actress. For other people with the same name, see Victoria Jackson (disambiguation).
Victoria Jackson
Victoria Jackson Occupy Wall Street 2011 Shankbone 2.JPG
Jackson at Occupy Wall Street in 2011
Born Victoria Lynn Jackson
(1959-08-02) August 2, 1959 (age 54)
Miami, Florida, U.S.
Alma mater Florida Bible College (attended)[1]
Furman University (attended)
Auburn University[1] (attended)
Palm Beach Atlantic University (degree in Theatre)[1]
Occupation Actress, comedian, singer
Years active 1982–present
Political party
Independent[2]
Religion Evangelical Christian
Spouse(s) Nisan Mark Eventoff (m. August 5, 1984, d. 1990)[1]
Paul Wessell (m. September 4, 1992 to present)[1]
Children Scarlet (1986),[1] Aubrey (1994)[1]
Website
victoriajackson.com

Victoria Lynn Jackson-Wessel[3] (born August 2, 1959) is an American comedian, actress, satirist, singer and internet blogger best known as a cast member of the NBC television sketch comedy series Saturday Night Live (SNL) from 1986 to 1992.

After SNL, she appeared in a number of movies and appears as a stand-up comedian. She has received attention as a vocal critic of President Barack Obama, and is an active participant in the Tea Party movement.

Early life[edit]

Jackson was born in Miami, Florida, the daughter of Marlene Esther (née Blackstad) and James McCaslin Jackson, a gym coach.[4] Raised by devout Christian parents in a home without a television,[5] she was trained in gymnastics by her father from ages 5 to 18. Jackson attended the private Dade Christian School, where she was a cheerleader and the Homecoming Queen. She subsequently attended Florida Bible College in Hollywood, Florida. Fourteen years of gymnastics competitions led to a scholarship at Furman University in Greenville, South Carolina. She also spent one year at Auburn University, before earning a degree in theatre from Palm Beach Atlantic University.[1]

Acting and comedy[edit]

Appearing in summer stock in Alabama led to a chance meeting with Johnny Crawford (of the 1950s television series, The Rifleman), who cast her in his night club act. She moved to Los Angeles where she supported herself with various day jobs as a cigarette girl, a typist at the American Cancer Society,[6] and a waitress, while she performed comedy at night. Her first big break was her appearance on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson where she performed what would become her signature act: doing a handstand while reciting poetry. She ultimately appeared on the show 20 times.

Saturday Night Live[edit]

In 1986, Jackson was hired to join Saturday Night Live[1] for its 12th season, following Lorne Michaels' firing of most of the 11th season's cast and writers. Jackson became most famous for her appearances on Weekend Update with Dennis Miller, again reciting poetry while doing back-bends or handstands on the desk, with Miller cracking a sexually suggestive comment at the end.[7]

Recurring characters on SNL[edit]

  • Brenda Clark from Toonces the Driving Cat
  • Jenny Baker, a Christian girl who appears on "Church Chat"
  • Nancy Maloney, a nightclub singer for The Jungle Room
  • Susan Keister, the daughter of the Keister family (played by Phil Hartman and Jan Hooks)

Celebrity impersonations[edit]

Jackson's impersonations of celebrities and famous persons have included: Calamity Jane, Christina Applegate, Cyndi Lauper, Donna Rice, Eydie Gorme, Fawn Hall, La Toya Jackson, Linda Blair, Lulu, Rob Lowe, Roseanne Barr, Sally Struthers, Susan Olsen (as Cindy Brady), Tina Yothers (as Jennifer Keaton), Tipper Gore, and Zsa Zsa Gabor.

Film roles[edit]

Jackson appeared in a number of films including Baby Boom with Diane Keaton, Family Business with Sean Connery, The Pick-up Artist, The Couch Trip and I Love You to Death during the time she was a cast member of Saturday Night Live. She had leading roles in Casual Sex? (with Lea Thompson) and UHF (with "Weird Al" Yankovic).

Later acting roles[edit]

Following her departure from Saturday Night Live, Jackson starred in an X-Files episode "The Rain King" as the unrequited love of a small town man who can control the weather. She appeared in the movie No More Baths in 1998.[8] She appeared in the Comedy Central series Strip Mall, in 2000. She had a regular role in the Nickelodeon show Romeo!, with Lil' Romeo for its first season, from 2003 to 2004, as the nanny, Mrs. Rodgers. In 2005, Jackson starred in the second edition of the VH1 show Celebrity Fit Club. In 2006 she was cast as Lolita Dorchuck in the mockumentary 20Q directed by Benjamin Keith.

She continues to perform stand up, often appearing with other ex-SNL players (most frequently Joe Piscopo and Don Novello as "Father Guido Sarducci").

Political activist[edit]

Jackson at a Tea Party rally in 2009

Jackson is a self-identified "devout Christian" and has appeared on programs such as The 700 Club[9] and Politically Incorrect. She also appears at Christian-oriented venues, and performed a stand-up routine in the 2007 Christian comedy concert Thou Shalt Laugh 2: The Deuce, which was hosted by Tim Conway.

In 2010, Jackson wrote in an article that she did not learn how to vote until the 2000 presidential election.[10] She maintains a personal website containing numerous postings highlighting her conservative political views. She criticized Democrats during the 2008 general election campaign, particularly presidential nominee Senator Barack Obama and Minnesota U.S. senatorial candidate (and fellow SNL alumnus) Al Franken. In October 2008, she appeared with other celebrities in a National Republican Senatorial Committee advertisement poking fun at Franken, then followed up with an interview on The O'Reilly Factor, where she called Obama a "communist."[11] She has repeated the communism claim on multiple occasions.[12][13]

When Obama won the election, she wrote on her blog: "Voters in our last election did not base their decision on facts or knowledge, but on hype, emotion, peer pressure, and racial fervor. It didn't help that the liberally biased media blocked Americans' access to the truth",[14] and she said Fox News is "the only one we should watch."[14]

In 2011, Jackson wrote that she thought she was being spied on because of her conservative views.[15]

In 2011, Jackson criticized the TV show Glee for showing a kiss between two male actors, calling it "sickening", and cited the Bible as one of her reasons for making such a statement. When accused of being homophobic, Jackson countered that that was merely a "cute liberal buzzword", and suggested that Glee should be replaced with a show promoting celibacy instead.[16]

In 2011, Jackson joined the staff of Patriot Update as a writer and video blogger. Her video on Occupy Wall Street[17] gained national attention when she returned to her former home during her Saturday Night Live years, to interview 'Occupiers' in Zuccotti Park. Soon after, Patriot Update launched a brand new show called Politichicks, featuring Jackson, Ann-Marie Murrrell, Jannique Stewart, and Jennie Jones. One song she wrote for "Politichicks", titled "Shariah Law," includes the lyrics "They [Muslims] like beheadings and pedophile weddings/ And then they pray five times a day./ They like to kill anyone who will/ Not say the things they want you to say."[18] She also hosts her own web show called "The Victoria Jackson Show".

In 2012, Jackson published her autobiography, Is My Bow Too Big? How I went from Saturday Night Live to the Tea Party.

After Rep. Todd Akin's remarks regarding pregnancies from rape, Jackson was quoted as saying, "If I got raped, I would have the baby. And if I didn't want to keep it because I had these horrible nightmares, I would adopt it out. But I think that God can turn a bad thing into a good thing. And that, if I got raped and a beautiful baby who was innocent was born out of it, that would be a blessing."[19]

In 2014, Jackson filed a petition as an independent candidate for the County Commission, running for one of two District 2 seats in Williamson County, Tennessee.[2]

Personal life[edit]

In 1984, Jackson married Nisan Mark Eventoff, who was a fire-eater and magician.[20] They had one daughter, Scarlet, before divorcing in 1990. She was reunited in 1991 with her high school sweetheart, Paul Wessel, a police helicopter pilot for Dade County, Florida. They were married and have a daughter, Aubrey. The family lived in Florida until 2012, when they moved to Thompson’s Station, Tennessee in order to be closer to their children.[2] In 2010, she became a grandmother.[7]

Books[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Victoria Jackson Biography". IMDb.com. Retrieved 2014-06-06. 
  2. ^ a b c [1][dead link]
  3. ^ "Former SNL star Victoria Jackson files to run for Tennessee county commission seat". Daily Mail (London). 
  4. ^ "Victoria Jackson biography (1959 -)". Theatre, Film, and Television Biographies. FilmReference.com. Retrieved March 27, 2010. 
  5. ^ Jackson, Victoria. "Victoria Jackson biography". VictoriaJackson.com. Retrieved March 27, 2010. 
  6. ^ "The Victoria Jackson Show – Comedy. Politics. Religion. You will never be the same". Victoriajackson.com. Retrieved 2012-07-31. 
  7. ^ a b Garcia, Gus (January 25, 2012). "Tea Party Princess Victoria Jackson went from the big leagues of comedy to the rabid right of modern politics Village Voice January 25, 2012". Villagevoice.com. Retrieved 2012-07-31. 
  8. ^ "No More Baths (1998)". Internet Movie Database. Retrieved March 27, 2010. 
  9. ^ "Victoria Jackson: Comedy's Christian Missionary" (Video). CBN on line. October 21, 2008. 
  10. ^ Nolte, John. "Breitbart News: Big Hollywood". Bighollywood.breitbart.com. Retrieved 2012-07-31. 
  11. ^ "Former SNL Member Victoria Jackson: Obama A "Communist," Like "Castro In Cuba, The Guy In China"". Huffington Post. November 1, 2008. Retrieved March 27, 2010. [dead link]
  12. ^ Huffington Post: Victoria Jackson On Fox News: Obama Is A Communist, Rush Limbaugh Should Run The Country. April 12, 2009.
  13. ^ thedailyshow.com. Moment of Zen: Glenn Beck Teaches Victoria Jackson. 2010-03-29.
  14. ^ a b Jackson, Victoria. "Victoria Jackson's Home Page". Retrieved March 27, 2010. 
  15. ^ Jackson, Victoria (March 11, 2011). "Spies: National security or silencing the opposition?". WorldNetDaily. Retrieved 2011-03-12. 
  16. ^ Jackson, Victoria (March 22, 2011). "Victoria Jackson: Homophobic a 'Cute Little Buzzword'". Newser. Retrieved 2011-03-22. 
  17. ^ Jackson, Victoria. "Victoria Jackson Takes on Occupy Wall Street Protestors". Patriot Update. Retrieved December 15, 2011. 
  18. ^ "CIA in bed with Muslin Brotherhood - Victoria Jackson". Victoriajacksonshow.com. 2012-10-25. Retrieved 2014-06-06. 
  19. ^ Signorile, Michelangelo (August 31, 2012). "Former 'SNL' Star Makes Shocking Comments About Rape And Gay Friends". Huffington Post. 
  20. ^ "Nisan Eventoff". Retrieved March 27, 2010. 

External links[edit]