Victory Destroyer Plant

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A wooden bridge from Dorchester to Squantum, constructed in 1917 to allow Boston Elevated Railway streetcars to bring employees to the plant

The Victory Destroyer Plant was a United States Naval Shipbuilding yard operational from 1918 to 1920 in Quincy, Massachusetts. It was then reused as a civil airport, and later Naval Air Station Squantum. It was owned by the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, and was constructed in order to relieve destroyer construction at the nearby Fore River Shipyard.[1]

Ships Constructed[edit]

Hull no. Ship name Commissioned Decommissioned Fate Service notes
DD261 Delphy 30 November 1918 26 October 1923 Wrecked in the Honda Point disaster 8 September 1923
DD262 McDermut 27 March 1919 22 May 1929 Scrapped London Naval Treaty[2]
DD263 Laub 17 March 1919 8 October 1940 Transferred Destroyers for Bases Agreement[3]
DD264 McLanahan 5 April 1919 8 October 1940 Transferred Destroyers for Bases Agreement[3]
DD265 Edwards 24 April 1919 8 October 1940 Transferred Destroyers for Bases Agreement[3]
DD266 Greene 9 May 1919 23 November 1945 Wrecked in a typhoon, struck 1945
DD267 Ballard 5 June 1919 5 December 1945 Scrapped 1946
DD268 Shubrick 3 July 1919 26 November 1940 Transferred Destroyers for Bases Agreement[3]
DD269 Bailey 27 June 1919 26 November 1940 Transferred Destroyers for Bases Agreement[3]
DD270 Thornton 15 July 1919 2 May 1945 Abandoned Donated to Ryukyu Islands 1957
DD271 Morris 21 July 1919 15 June 1922 Scrapped 1936
DD272 Tingey 25 July 1919 24 May 1922 Scrapped 1936
DD273 Swasey 8 August 1919 10 June 1922 Transferred Destroyers for Bases Agreement[3]
DD274 Meade 8 September 1919 18 December 1939 Transferred Destroyers for Bases Agreement[3]
DD275 Sinclair 8 October 1919 1 June 1929 Scrapped 1935
DD276 McCawley 22 September 1919 1 April 1930 Scrapped London Naval Treaty[4]
DD277 Moody 10 December 1919 2 June 1930 Sold Sold to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer in 1931 for making of World War I film Hell Below. DD-277 was made up to look like a German World War I destroyer and was sunk in 1933 by studio demolitions.
DD278 Henshaw 10 December 1919 11 March 1930 Scrapped London Naval Treaty
DD279 Meyer 17 December 1919 15 May 1929 Scrapped London Naval Treaty[5]
DD280 Doyen 17 December 1919 25 February 1930 Scrapped London Naval Treaty[6]
DD281 Sharkey 28 November 1919 1 May 1930 Scrapped London Naval Treaty[7]
DD282 Toucey 9 December 1919 1 May 1930 Scrapped London Naval Treaty[8]
DD283 Breck 1 December 1919 1 May 1930 Scrapped London Naval Treaty[9]
DD284 Isherwood 4 December 1919 1 May 1930 Scrapped London Naval Treaty[10]
DD285 Case 8 December 1919 22 October 1930 Scrapped London Naval Treaty[11]
DD286 Lardner 10 December 1919 1 May 1930 Scrapped London Naval Treaty[12]
DD287 Putnam 18 December 1919 21 September 1929 Sold converted to banana boat Teapa[13]
DD288 Worden 24 February 1920 1 May 1930 Sold converted to banana boat Tabasco[13]
DD289 Flusser 25 February 1920 1 May 1930 Scrapped London Naval Treaty[14]
DD290 Dale 16 February 1920 1 May 1930 Sold converted to banana boat Masaya[13]
DD291 Converse 28 April 1920 1 May 1930 Scrapped London Naval Treaty[15]
DD292 Reid 3 December 1919 1 May 1930 Scrapped London Naval Treaty[16]
DD293 Billingsley 1 March 1920 1 May 1930 Scrapped London Naval Treaty[17]
DD294 Charles Ausburn 23 March 1920 1 May 1930 Scrapped London Naval Treaty[18]
DD295 Osborne 17 May 1920 1 May 1930 Sold converted to banana boat Matagalpa[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Destroyer History Foundation". Destroyer History Foundation. 2013. Retrieved 9 June 2013. 
  2. ^ "McDermut". DANFS. United States Navy. Retrieved 5 January 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Blair, Clay (1996). Hitler's U-Boat War:The Hunters 1939–1942. New York: Random House. pp. 743&744. ISBN 0-394-58839-8. 
  4. ^ "McCawley". DANFS. United States Navy. Retrieved 5 January 2014. 
  5. ^ "Meyer". DANFS. United States Navy. Retrieved 5 January 2014. 
  6. ^ "Doyen". DANFS. United States Navy. Retrieved 5 January 2014. 
  7. ^ "Sharkey". DANFS. United States Navy. Retrieved 5 January 2014. 
  8. ^ "Toucey". DANFS. United States Navy. Retrieved 5 January 2014. 
  9. ^ "Breck". DANFS. United States Navy. Retrieved 5 January 2014. 
  10. ^ "Isherwood". DANFS. United States Navy. Retrieved 5 January 2014. 
  11. ^ "Case". DANFS. United States Navy. Retrieved 5 January 2014. 
  12. ^ "Lardner". DANFS. United States Navy. Retrieved 5 January 2014. 
  13. ^ a b c d Fetterly, Don. "The Saga of SS Masaya". Pacific Wrecks. Retrieved 5 January 2014. 
  14. ^ "Flusser". DANFS. United States Navy. Retrieved 5 January 2014. 
  15. ^ "Converse". DANFS. United States Navy. Retrieved 5 January 2014. 
  16. ^ "Reid". DANFS. United States Navy. Retrieved 5 January 2014. 
  17. ^ "Billingsley". DANFS. United States Navy. Retrieved 5 January 2014. 
  18. ^ "Charles Ausburn(e)". DANFS. United States Navy. Retrieved 5 January 2014. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 42°17′59.36″N 71°1′46.38″W / 42.2998222°N 71.0295500°W / 42.2998222; -71.0295500