Vietnam national football team

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Vietnam Vietnam
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Rồng Vàng
(Golden Dragons)
Chiến Binh Sao Vàng
(The Golden Star Warriors)
AssociationVietnam Football Federation (VFF)
ConfederationAFC (Asia)
Sub-confederationAFF (Southeast Asia)
Head coachPark Hang-seo
CaptainQuế Ngọc Hải
Most capsLê Công Vinh (83)
Top scorerLê Công Vinh (51)
Home stadiumMỹ Đình National Stadium
FIFA codeVIE
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 94 Steady (19 December 2019)[1]
Highest84 (September 1998[2])
Lowest172 (December 2006)
Elo ranking
Current 104 Increase 35 (25 November 2019)[3]
Highest58 (October 2002)
Lowest175 (January 1995)
First international
 Hong Kong 3–2 South Vietnam 
(Mong Kok, Hong Kong; 20 April 1947)[4]
 China PR 5–3 North Vietnam 
(Beijing, China; 4 October 1956)[5]
Biggest win
Vietnam 11–0 Guam 
(Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam; 23 January 2000)
Biggest defeat
 Zimbabwe 6–0 Vietnam
(Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 26 February 1997)
 Oman 6–0 Vietnam
(Incheon, South Korea; 29 February 2003)
Asian Cup
Appearances4 (first in 1956)
Best result4th place, and Quarterfinals (1956, 1960, 2019)

The Vietnam national football team (Vietnamese: Đội tuyển bóng đá quốc gia Việt Nam) represents Vietnam in international football and is controlled by the Vietnam Football Federation, the governing body of football in Vietnam.

Vietnam has a long history of football, as a result of the sport being introduced by the French in the 19th century. However, due to various conflicts that occurred in the country throughout the 20th century, development of Vietnamese football was significantly hampered during these times.[6][7]

While Vietnam was split into North and South Vietnam, two national teams existed and both were controlled by separate governing bodies. After the two countries unified in 1976, the separate governing bodies was combined and renamed to the Vietnam Football Federation.[8]

Since the 1990s when Vietnam rejoined global world football, the sport soon became part of Vietnamese society and a weapon to fight the negative reputation of the country due to the traumatic Vietnam War and later conflicts. This made the national team become part of Vietnamese nationalism and contributed to passionate support worldwide. Vietnamese supporters are dubbed to be some of the best and most passionate fans, renowned for large celebrations over the team's achievements, regardless if it is a senior or youth side.[9][10]

History[edit]

Early history (1896—1955)[edit]

Early Vietnamese football with Vietnamese players and French officials in the Championnat Cochinchine, c. 1922–23.

The introduction of football into Vietnam traced its roots in 1896 during the era of colonial French Cochinchina. At the early stage, the sport are only played among French civil servants, merchants and soldiers. The French then encouraged local Vietnamese to played football and several other sports that were introduced to them to divert their interest from politics which resulting the sport being spread to other regions, mostly the northern and central region.[11][12] On 20 July 1908, the newspaper Southern Luc Tan Van reported the match between two local Vietnamese teams for the first time. A first football guidebook then published in 1925 by a local Vietnamese doctor named Pham Van Tiec to attract the interest among Vietnamese youngsters.[13] By 1928, the Vietnamese had established the Annamite Sports Bureau and in the same year they sent a Vietnamese football team to compete in Singapore. More local football clubs then established in both northern and southern Vietnam although it was not until after the World War II that football clubs in the region started to become more organised.[14] It was the time Vietnam played their first ever international match, against Korea in Saigon which they lost 2–4.

Two Vietnam national teams (1956—1989)[edit]

South Vietnam
The South Vietnam team winning gold at the 1959 Southeast Asian Peninsular Games.
North Vietnam
The North Vietnam team in 1956.

Two national football teams then existed when Vietnam was divided into South Vietnam and North Vietnam. The team from the South participated in the first two AFC Asian Cup finals (1956 AFC Asian Cup and 1960 AFC Asian Cup) and finished in fourth place both times. They won the first Southeast Asian Games in 1959 in Thailand. The team also entered qualification for the 1974 FIFA World Cup, beating Thailand 1–0 to qualify the classification matches before losing their group opening matches by 0–4 to Japan and 0–1 to Hong Kong. The team played their last game against Malaysia in 1975 where they lost 0–3. Meanwhile, the team from the North was less active, not being a member of either AFC and FIFA, often playing against other Communist states between 1956 and 1966. They had their first match against China PR where they lost 3–5 under head coach Truong Tan Buu. They participated in the first GANEFO (Games of the New Emerging Forces) competitions at Indonesia in 1962 and Cambodia in 1966. Both team ceased to exist when the North and South regions were combined together into the Socialist Republic of Vietnam following the end of the Vietnam War, but North Vietnam remained not a member of AFC and FIFA before 1975.[15] Due to South Vietnam was a member of FIFA, the later unified Vietnam team is classified as successor of South Vietnam by FIFA.

The development of football during this era for both Vietnams was marked with stagnation as the Vietnam War occurred at the same time. The Vietnam War, a war that occurred between two states, had a tremendous impact and delayed the development of football in the country. Because of the war, Vietnam, by then, a major football force in Asia, started losing its reputation as the war ruined the country. Thus, the conflict had greatly reduced Vietnamese football ability and weakened the country seriously. However, the following Cambodian–Vietnamese War and Sino-Vietnamese War, and global sanctions against the country, had depleted the nation's football team and turned Vietnam into one of the weakest teams in the world and Asia overall. For this reason, Vietnamese football can be still considered as new and unknown for the rest of the world, in spite of its long standing history as Vietnam only rejoined global football in 1991.

Post Vietnam War and redevelopment era (1990—2013)[edit]

Scenes during the final of 2008 AFF Championship. Clockwise from top: Vietnamese supporters during Vietnam's triumph, Vietnamese team receiving the cup and Vietnamese team before the second leg final matches.

Vietnamese professional football league known as the All Vietnam Football Championship was launched in 1980 to redevelop Vietnamese football after a long period of civil war. In 1989, following the Đổi Mới reforms, a new football federation was formed. Vietnamese sports began to return to international events. After three months of preparation, in August 1989, the First Congress of the new football federation took place in Hanoi, declaring the formation of the Vietnam Football Federation. Trịnh Ngọc Chữ, deputy minister of General Department of Sports, was elected as the first president of VFF.[16] The reunified Vietnam national football team then played their first match against the Philippines in 1991 where they had a draw.[17]

Vietnam participated in the country's first ever FIFA World Cup qualification in 1994 World Cup campaign for the first time as an unified nation, having participated in 1974 qualification as South Vietnam. The national side at the time was not successful in World Cup campaigns, failing in both 1994 and 1998 qualifications with only one single win.

In 1996, Vietnam participated in the first Tiger Cup where they finished in third place and hosted the second Tiger Cup in 1998 where they lost 0–1 to Singapore in the final. From 2000 to 2007, Vietnam continued their quest to win the Southeast Asian trophy, but often ended short by losing semi-finals or eliminated in the group stage.

Vietnam was the host of the 1999 Dunhill Cup, a friendly tournament for both senior and U-23 players. Since it was categorized as a mingled senior and U-23 competition, some national teams had decided to participate using its senior reserve side. In this competition, Vietnam created a promising performance, including a shock win over then-1994 FIFA World Cup and UEFA Euro 1996 participant Russia 1–0 and drew with 1998 FIFA World Cup participant Iran 2–2 and topped the group. Vietnam was then eliminated in the semi-finals after a 1–4 defeat to the hand of China.

2002 FIFA World Cup qualification was some few bright of Vietnam during these World Cup campaigns, with the team won three and drew one, both played in Dammam. However, with the team failed to Saudi Arabia, Vietnam didn't qualify for the World Cup. The 2004 AFC Asian Cup qualification was also unsuccessful, with Vietnam fell to South Korea and Oman, but managed to create a shock 1–0 win to 2002 FIFA World Cup's fourth-place South Korea in Muscat, which remained as one of Vietnam's greatest football feats since unification.[18] The 2006 FIFA World Cup qualification had been extremely depressing for Vietnam, with the team once again failed, falling behind South Korea and Lebanon, and only stayed above Maldives by goal differences.

During that shortcoming era, Vietnam hosted the 2007 AFC Asian Cup along with Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand; despite failure to qualify for previous Asian Cup since 1990s. The team was ranked second lowest only after Malaysia, but in the group stage, Vietnam created shock by defeating the UAE 2–0, drew 1–1 with another Gulf team, Qatar, before lost 1–4 to Japan yet were the only Southeast Asian and host team to reach quarter-finals, where they lost to eventual champions Iraq 0–2.[19] The amazing journey of Vietnam began the first renaissance of Vietnamese football.

Vietnam won the first AFF Championship title in 2008, which they were held in Group B with Thailand, Malaysia and Laos. After losing Thailand 0–2 in the opener, Vietnam defeated Malaysia 3–2 and Laos 4–0. In semi-finals, Vietnam hold the defending champion Singapore by 0–0 in home match before winning 1–0 away. Vietnam met Thailand again in the finals and defeated them 3–2 aggregated, won the away match 2–1 then drew 1–1 at home.[20] This would be the team's first international honour since rejoining global football, and it took 10 years until the team repeated this feat.

Vietnam almost managed a successful 2011 AFC Asian Cup qualification when Vietnam performed well against Syria and Lebanon, as well as against China; but the shortcoming on scoring goals once again proved to be instrumental on denying Vietnam's qualification to 2011 AFC Asian Cup, as the team finished third with only a single 3–1 home win over Lebanon[21] and two draws away to both Levant opponents Syria and Lebanon.

Decline and rebuilding (2014—2016)[edit]

Vietnam participated in 2010, 2014 World Cup qualifiers and 2011, 2015 Asian Cup qualifiers, but were unsuccessful, as the team's shortcoming contributed to its early elimination.

The national team of Vietnam started to witness significant changes under the tenure of Toshiya Miura, who took charge of Vietnam from 2014–16. The Japanese coach was accredited for rebuilding the national team of Vietnam after the failed 2015 AFC Asian Cup qualification, and had a significant impact on the improvement of the team's performances. One of the most renowned achievement under Miura's era was with the youth team, when U-23 side managed to cruise U-23 Iran, a major Asian force, in 2014 Asian Games with an unthinkable 4–1.[22] Many of these young players nurtured by coach Miura would be brought to senior side, where the team managed a fine performance in 2014 AFF Championship, but Vietnam failed to progress beyond the semi-finals after suffering a shock 2–4 defeat to Malaysia right at home,[23] in spite of winning 2–1 away before.[24] Vietnamese police had sought to investigate this match, but found no evidence of rigged bribery or corruption as also stated in the findings of Swiss-based international supplier betting services Sportradar.[25][26]

Miura led Vietnam in the 2018 World Cup qualifiers when Vietnam was grouped together with Thailand, Indonesia, Chinese Taipei and Iraq; Indonesia later withdrew. Vietnam managed a fine performance, drawing Iraq 1–1 at home.[27] However, two disappointing defeats to Thailand away 0–1[28] and humiliating 0–3 home loss to the same opponent[29] had put the team under heavy criticism. Toshiya Miura, despite improvement, was sacked by the VFF after the U-23 side's failure to qualify for 2016 Rio Olympics.[30]

Hope was put into new coach, Nguyễn Hữu Thắng, some of the first fine Vietnamese managers during the era. Under Thắng, Vietnam once again progressed to the semi-finals of 2016 AFF Championship, but the team had to bow down to Indonesia in another thrilling semi-finals, being held 2–2 at home[31] and previously lost 1–2 away to the same rival.[32] The team's disappointment somehow relieved a little, as the Golden Dragons participated in 2019 AFC Asian Cup qualification for finishing third in their World Cup qualification group. The Vietnamese side managed two draws in their opening run against Afghanistan in Tajikistan[33] and a goalless draw to Jordan in Ho Chi Minh City.[34] However, with the U-22 side was shockingly eliminated in the group stage of 2017 SEA Games, coach Nguyễn Hữu Thắng was relieved from duty, and the team faced a tremendous crisis of confidence as fans have lost their will to support the team.[35] Interim coach Mai Đức Chung was appointed to help Vietnam in two crucial Asian Cup qualification match against neighbour Cambodia, in which coach Chung was able to revive some of the team's lost spirit, beating Cambodia 2–1 away and a thrashing 5–0 win at home.[36] These wins allowed Vietnam to join top two for final tickets.

2017—present: beginning of new dawn[edit]

Scenes during the quarter-finals of 2019 AFC Asian Cup. Clockwise from top: Vietnamese team with Japan at the cup quarter-finals and Vietnamese fans during the match.

Park Hang-seo, former assistant of Guus Hiddink during the 2002 FIFA World Cup, was appointed as new coach of Vietnam in 2017 after an attempt to negotiate with Takashi Sekizuka was unsuccessful.[38] Upon his arrival to Vietnam, Park Hang-seo was greeted with skepticism and jeers from Vietnamese.[39]

Park's first match as coach of Vietnam was in the same 2019 Asian Cup qualification, where Vietnam held Afghanistan at home in a 0–0 draw, thus allowed Vietnam to qualify for the 2019 AFC Asian Cup, their first ever Asian Cup since 2007.[40] Park himself, though, was criticized.[41] However, the mood changed after the performance in the 2018 AFC U-23 Championship; Park Hang-seo was also coach of the U-23 team.[42] With the same U-23 players, he formed the squad of Vietnamese senior in a meaningless 1–1 draw to Jordan in 2019 Asian Cup qualification, which both teams qualified together.[43] Also with these young players, the 2018 AFF Championship became Vietnam's second AFF Championship title. In Group A, Vietnam managed 3 victories against Laos, Malaysia, Cambodia and a draw with Myanmar. In the semi-finals, they defeated the Philippines twice, and in the finals defeated Malaysia 3–2 aggregated, drawing 2–2 away and winning 1–0 home.[44]

But only the 2019 AFC Asian Cup that Vietnam truly began to gain international recognition. With entire of squad made up with the successful U-23 players, the youngest squad in the tournament, Vietnam beat Yemen in their final group matches to become the last best-fourth place team to qualify for the round of sixteen. Then, they surprised everyone by defeating favored Jordan, winning 4–2 in penalty shoot-out.[45] The win sent million of Vietnamese into the street for celebrations.[46] In the quarter-finals, Vietnam met Japan but failed to continue the success after their opponent being awarded a penalty kick which being decided through the video assistant referee (VAR), resulting to a 0–1 score by Ritsu Doan until the final whistle being blown.[47]

Vietnam was grouped in the 2022 World Cup qualification group G with three other Southeast Asian rivals, Thailand, Indonesia and Malaysia, along with United Arab Emirates. Vietnam was not given much of a chance, but the Vietnamese started with a 0–0 away draw over Thailand[48] before defeating Malaysia 1–0 at home[49] and then achieving the first ever Vietnamese victory against Indonesia, in Indonesian soil, in any major competition.[50] In November, Vietnam faced up the United Arab Emirates at home soil with attempts to break 12-year winless streak to the opponent. In spite of facing struggle in early minutes, a following red card to the UAE gave the Vietnamese an advantage, eventually managed to beat the Emirates 1–0.[51] Then, Vietnam moved to a thrilling encounter against neighbor and fellow powerhouse Thailand at home, where both teams played out in another goalless draw, including a crucial Akinfeev-penalty save by Đặng Văn Lâm and two disallowed goals of Vietnamese side, to foster Vietnam's no.1 position in the FIFA World Cup qualification group G.[52]

Team image[edit]

Vietnamese supporters during the 2019 AFC Asian Cup in all red and yellow star dress similar as in the colour of the flag of Vietnam.

Vietnam's current kit sponsor is Grand Sport. The contract started in January 2015 which will end by the end of December 2019 but extended until 2023. Vietnam was also previously sponsored by Adidas, Li-Ning and Nike. The tradition home colour for the Vietnamese team is all red with yellow trim and the away colour is all white with red trim ever since they started the contract with Nike. With Adidas, it was just red and white. Occasionally, the team wore blue and yellow jerseys.

Nicknames[edit]

The national team of Vietnam has been known in several nicknames, the most commonly are "Rồng Vàng" (Golden Dragons) which is influenced from the history of Vietnam including the legend of Lạc Long Quân, the dragon King in Vietnamese folk story who gave the Vietnamese identity for his people, and also appeared in former emblems of Vietnamese dynasty as well as South Vietnam.[53] Another nickname is the "Những chiến binh sao Vàng" (Golden Star warriors) which is derived from the national flag of Vietnam.[54] The local media and people in Vietnam also refer the national team as simply as "Tuyển" (The Selection).[55]

Kit suppliers[edit]

Kit supplier Period Notes
Adidas 1996–2005 [56]
Li-Ning 2006—2008
Nike 2009—2014
Grand Sport 2014—2023

Supporters[edit]

There are two major supporters for the national team, namely Vietnam Football Supporters or VFS (Vietnamese: Hội Cổ động viên Bóng đá Việt Nam) which was founded in 2014 and Vietnam Golden Stars or VGS (Vietnamese: Hội Cổ động viên Sao vàng Việt Nam) which was founded in 2017.

When the national team won big matches, the streets are often overwhelmed by large Vietnamese crowds, demonstrating nationalist chants, singing Vietnamese nationalist songs.[10] Vietnamese passionate supporters have been witnessed during 2007 AFC Asian Cup when the team defeated the UAE 2–0 and later, the lone Southeast Asian side to sneak into the quarter-finals.[57] During the 2019 AFC Asian Cup, Vietnamese fans had gone wild to celebration after beating Jordan in the round of sixteen.[58]

Even in smaller tournaments, Vietnamese fans are also noted for large celebration, such as when Vietnam won the 2008 AFF Championship and 2018 AFF Championship, and recently 2018 AFC U-23 Championship which their Olympic team finished second after losing the final.[59]

Sponsorship[edit]

Primary sponsors include: Honda Vietnam,[60] Yanmar,[61] Grand Sport,[62] Suzuki Vietnam,[63] Sony Vietnam,[64] Z.com,[65] VPMilk,[66] Vina Acecook,[67] Coca-Cola,[68] Vinamilk[69] and Kao Vietnam.[70]

Stadiums[edit]

Vietnamese national team plays mainly in Mỹ Đình National Stadium, though some other venues are also being used.

Training centre[edit]

In the previous past, Vietnamese football team did not have any major football centre and had to practice in sporadic centres, contributed to its lack of successes. However, since 2017, the country first ever football training centre, known as PVF Training Centre, was established in Hưng Yên to improve the national team's performance.[71] Former Manchester United star and current Wales coach, Ryan Giggs was appointed as the first director of the centre alongside Paul Scholes.[72]

Competitive records[edit]

FIFA World Cup[edit]

FIFA World Cup record Qualifications record Coach(es)
Year Result Pos. Pld W D L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
1930 to 1950 Did not participate Did not participate N/A
1954 to 1974 See South Vietnam See South Vietnam See South Vietnam
1978 to 1990 Did not enter Did not enter N/A
1994 Did not qualify 8 1 0 7 4 18 Trần Bình Sự
1998 6 0 0 6 2 21 Trần Duy Long,
Lê Đình Chính
2002 6 3 1 2 9 9 Dido
2006 6 1 1 4 5 9 Nguyễn Thành Vinh
, Edson Tavares
2010 2 0 0 2 0 6 Alfred Riedl
2014 4 3 0 1 15 5 Falko Götz
2018 6 2 1 3 7 8 Toshiya Miura,
Nguyễn Hữu Thắng
2022 To be determined In progress Park Hang-seo
2026 To be determined To be determined
Total N/A 0/21 0 0 0 0 0 0 37 10 3 24 42 75

AFC Asian Cup[edit]

AFC Asian Cup record AFC Asian Cup qualification
Year Result Pos. Pld W D L GF GA Pld W D L GF GA
1956 Fourth place 4th 3 0 1 2 6 9 2 0 1 1 7 3
1960 Fourth place 4th 3 0 0 3 2 12 2 2 0 0 5 1
1964 to 1972 See South Vietnam See South Vietnam
1976 to 1992 Did not enter Did not enter
1996 Did not qualify 3 2 0 1 13 5
2000 3 2 0 1 14 2
2004 6 3 0 3 8 13
2007 Quarter-finals 8/16 4 1 1 2 4 7 Host
2011 Did not qualify 6 1 2 3 6 11
2015 6 1 0 5 5 15
2019 Quarter-finals 8/24 5 1 1 3 5 7 12 4 5 3 16 11
2023 To be determined In progress
Total Best: Fourth place 4/17 15 2 3 10 17 35 40 15 8 17 74 61

Asian Games[edit]

Since 2002, the Asian Games Football tournament uses the Olympic team. See: Vietnam national Olympic football team

Asian Games record Coach(es)
Year Result Pos. Pld W D L GF GA
1951 Did not participate Did not participate
1954 to 1974 See South Vietnam See South Vietnam
1978 to 1994 Did not enter Did not enter
1998 Group stage 2 0 0 2 0 6 Alfred Riedl
Total Best: Group Stage 1/13 2 0 0 2 0 6

AFF Championship[edit]

AFF Championship record Coach(es)
Year Result Pos. Pld W D L GF GA
1996 Third place 3/10 6 3 2 1 14 10 Karl-Heinz Weigang
1998 Runner-up 2/8 5 3 1 1 8 2 Alfred Riedl
2000 Fourth place 4/9 6 3 1 2 14 6 Alfred Riedl
2002 Third place 3/9 6 4 1 1 21 12 Henrique Calisto
2004 Group stage 6/10 4 2 1 1 13 5 Edson Tavares,
Trần Văn Khánh
2007 Semi-finals 3/8 5 1 3 1 10 3 Alfred Riedl
2008 Champions 1/8 7 4 2 1 11 6 Henrique Calisto
2010 Semi-finals 3/8 5 2 1 2 8 5 Henrique Calisto
2012 Group stage 6/8 3 0 1 2 2 5 Phan Thanh Hùng
2014 Semi-finals 3/8 5 3 1 1 12 8 Toshiya Miura
2016 Semi-finals 3/8 5 3 1 1 8 6 Nguyễn Hữu Thắng
2018 Champions 1/10 8 6 2 0 15 4 Park Hang-seo
Total 2 titles 12/12 65 34 17 14 136 72

Southeast Asian Games[edit]

Since 2001, the SEA games football competition uses the Olympic team. See: Vietnam national Olympic football team

Southeast Asian Games record Coach(es)
Year Result Pos. Pld W D L GF GA
1959 to 1973 See South Vietnam See South Vietnam
1975 to 1989 Did not enter Did not enter
1991 Group stage 6/7 3 0 1 2 3 5 Nguyễn Sỹ Hiển
1993 Group stage 6/9 3 1 0 2 1 3 Trần Bình Sự
1995 Runner-up 2/10 6 4 0 2 10 8 Karl-Heinz Weigang
1997 Third place 3/10 6 3 1 2 9 6 Colin Murphy
1999 Runner-up 2/10 6 4 1 1 14 2 Alfred Riedl
Total Best: Runner-up 5/20 24 12 3 9 37 24

Vietnam Football Federation Cup[edit]

VFF Cup record Coach(es)
Year Result Pos. Pld W D L GF GA
2004 Agribank Cup Runner-up 2/4 3 2 0 1 4 3 Edson Tavares
2006 Runner-up 2/4 3 2 1 0 5 2 Alfred Riedl
2008 T&T Cup Runner-up 2/3 2 0 2 0 2 2 Henrique Calisto
2010 VFF Son Ha Cup Fourth place 4/4 3 0 1 2 1 5 Henrique Calisto
2012 VFF Cup Third place 3/4 3 1 1 1 5 2 Phan Thanh Hùng
Total Best: Runner-up 5/5 14 5 5 4 17 14

Results and fixtures[edit]

  Win   Draw   Loss

2019[edit]

2020[edit]

Players[edit]

Current squad[edit]

The following 23 players were called up for the 2022 FIFA World Cup qualification matches against United Arab Emirates on 14 November 2019 and against Thailand on 19 November 2019
Caps and goals are as of 19 November 2019 after the match against Thailand.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Nguyễn Tuấn Mạnh (1990-07-31) 31 July 1990 (age 29) 4 0 Vietnam Sanna Khánh Hòa BVN
18 1GK Phạm Văn Cường (1990-07-19) 19 July 1990 (age 29) 0 0 Vietnam Quảng Nam
23 1GK Đặng Văn Lâm (1993-08-13) 13 August 1993 (age 26) 23 0 Thailand Muangthong United
2 2DF Đỗ Duy Mạnh (1996-09-29) 29 September 1996 (age 23) 27 1 Vietnam Hà Nội
3 2DF Quế Ngọc Hải (Captain) (1993-05-15) 15 May 1993 (age 26) 46 3 Vietnam Viettel
4 2DF Bùi Tiến Dũng (1995-10-02) 2 October 1995 (age 24) 24 0 Vietnam Viettel
5 2DF Đoàn Văn Hậu (1999-04-19) 19 April 1999 (age 20) 23 0 Netherlands SC Heerenveen
12 2DF Lê Văn Đại (1996-05-13) 13 May 1996 (age 23) 0 0 Vietnam Thanh Hóa
17 2DF Vũ Văn Thanh (1996-04-14) 14 April 1996 (age 23) 18 2 Vietnam Hoàng Anh Gia Lai
21 2DF Nguyễn Thành Chung (1997-09-08) 8 September 1997 (age 22) 1 0 Vietnam Hà Nội
6 3MF Nguyễn Hoàng Đức (1998-01-11) 11 January 1998 (age 22) 1 0 Vietnam Viettel
7 3MF Nguyễn Phong Hồng Duy (1996-06-13) 13 June 1996 (age 23) 11 0 Vietnam Hoàng Anh Gia Lai
8 3MF Nguyễn Trọng Hoàng (1989-04-14) 14 April 1989 (age 30) 69 12 Vietnam Viettel
14 3MF Nguyễn Tuấn Anh (1995-05-16) 16 May 1995 (age 24) 12 1 Vietnam Hoàng Anh Gia Lai
15 3MF Phạm Đức Huy (1995-01-20) 20 January 1995 (age 25) 11 2 Vietnam Hà Nội
16 3MF Đỗ Hùng Dũng (Vice-captain) (1993-09-08) 8 September 1993 (age 26) 19 0 Vietnam Hà Nội
19 3MF Nguyễn Quang Hải (1997-04-12) 12 April 1997 (age 22) 24 6 Vietnam Hà Nội
20 3MF Nguyễn Trọng Hùng (1997-10-03) 3 October 1997 (age 22) 0 0 Vietnam Thanh Hóa
9 4FW Nguyễn Văn Toàn (3rd captain) (1996-04-12) 12 April 1996 (age 23) 27 4 Vietnam Hoàng Anh Gia Lai
10 4FW Nguyễn Công Phượng (1995-01-21) 21 January 1995 (age 25) 35 8 Vietnam Hồ Chí Minh City
11 4FW Nguyễn Anh ĐứcRET (1985-10-24) 24 October 1985 (age 34) 36 12 Vietnam Becamex Bình Dương
13 4FW Hà Minh Tuấn (1991-01-01) 1 January 1991 (age 29) 0 0 Vietnam Quảng Nam
22 4FW Nguyễn Tiến Linh (1997-10-20) 20 October 1997 (age 22) 12 4 Vietnam Becamex Bình Dương

Recent call-ups[edit]

The following players have also been called up to the Vietnam squad within the last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Trần Nguyên Mạnh (1991-12-20) 20 December 1991 (age 28) 24 0 Vietnam Viettel v.  Malaysia, 10 October 2019 INJ
GK Nguyễn Văn Toản (1999-11-26) 26 November 1999 (age 20) 0 0 Vietnam Hải Phòng 2019 King's Cup
GK Bùi Tiến Dũng (1997-02-28) 28 February 1997 (age 22) 1 0 Vietnam Hồ Chí Minh City 2019 AFC Asian Cup
DF Nguyễn Hữu Tuấn (1992-05-06) 6 May 1992 (age 27) 0 0 Vietnam Hồ Chí Minh City v.  Thailand, 19 November 2019 PRE
DF Trần Văn Kiên (1996-05-13) 13 May 1996 (age 23) 1 0 Vietnam Hanoi FC v.  United Arab Emirates, 14 November 2019 PRE
DF Phạm Xuân Mạnh (1996-02-09) 9 February 1996 (age 23) 1 0 Vietnam Sông Lam Nghệ An v.  United Arab Emirates, 14 November 2019 INJ
DF A Hoàng (1995-07-31) 31 July 1995 (age 24) 2 0 Vietnam Hoàng Anh Gia Lai v.  Malaysia, 10 October 2019 PRE
DF Nguyễn Công Thành (1991-07-26) 26 July 1991 (age 28) 0 0 Vietnam Hồ Chí Minh City v.  Malaysia, 10 October 2019 PRE
DF Đỗ Thanh Thịnh (1998-08-18) 18 August 1998 (age 21) 0 0 Vietnam SHB Đà Nẵng v.  Thailand, 5 September 2019 PRE
DF Lâm Anh Quang (1991-04-24) 24 April 1991 (age 28) 0 0 Vietnam Nam Định v.  Thailand, 5 September 2019 PRE
DF Huỳnh Tấn Sinh (1998-04-06) 6 April 1998 (age 21) 0 0 Vietnam Quảng Nam 2019 King's Cup
DF Trần Đình Trọng (1997-04-25) 25 April 1997 (age 22) 9 0 Vietnam Hà Nội 2019 King's Cup INJ
DF Hồ Tấn Tài (1997-11-06) 6 November 1997 (age 22) 0 0 Vietnam Becamex Bình Dương 2019 AFC Asian Cup
DF Ngô Tùng Quốc (1998-01-27) 27 January 1998 (age 21) 0 0 Vietnam Hồ Chí Minh City 2019 AFC Asian Cup PRE
DF Lục Xuân Hưng (1995-04-15) 15 April 1995 (age 24) 0 0 Vietnam SHB Đà Nẵng 2019 AFC Asian Cup INJ
MF Nguyễn Huy Hùng (1992-03-02) 2 March 1992 (age 27) 24 2 Vietnam Quảng Nam v.  Thailand, 19 November 2019 PRE
MF Ngô Hoàng Thịnh (1992-04-21) 21 April 1992 (age 27) 15 2 Vietnam Hồ Chí Minh City v.  United Arab Emirates, 14 November 2019 INJ
MF Lương Xuân Trường (1995-04-28) 28 April 1995 (age 24) 29 1 Vietnam Hoàng Anh Gia Lai v.  Malaysia, 10 October 2019 INJ
MF Võ Huy Toàn (1993-03-15) 15 March 1993 (age 26) 8 1 Vietnam Hồ Chí Minh City v.  Malaysia, 10 October 2019 INJ
MF Tô Văn Vũ (1993-10-20) 20 October 1993 (age 26) 0 0 Vietnam Becamex Bình Dương v.  Malaysia, 10 October 2019 PRE
MF Đặng Anh Tuấn (1994-08-01) 1 August 1994 (age 25) 0 0 Vietnam SHB Đà Nẵng v.  Malaysia, 10 October 2019 PRE
MF Trần Minh Vương (1995-03-28) 28 March 1995 (age 24) 4 0 Vietnam Hoàng Anh Gia Lai 2019 King's Cup
MF Phan Văn Đức (1996-04-11) 11 April 1996 (age 23) 14 2 Vietnam Sông Lam Nghệ An 2019 AFC Asian Cup INJ
MF Phan Thanh Hậu (1997-01-12) 12 January 1997 (age 23) 0 0 Vietnam Hoàng Anh Gia Lai 2019 AFC Asian Cup PRE
FW Ngân Văn Đại (1992-02-09) 9 February 1992 (age 27) 2 0 Vietnam Hà Nội v.  United Arab Emirates, 14 November 2019 PRE
FW Nguyễn Việt Phong (1993-03-23) 23 March 1993 (age 26) 2 0 Vietnam Viettel v.  United Arab Emirates, 14 November 2019 PRE
FW Mạc Hồng Quân (1992-01-01) 1 January 1992 (age 28) 14 3 Vietnam Than Quang Ninh v.  Malaysia, 10 October 2019 INJ
FW Hà Đức Chinh (1997-09-22) 22 September 1997 (age 22) 6 0 Vietnam SHB Đà Nẵng 2019 King's Cup
FW Đinh Thanh Bình (1998-03-19) 19 March 1998 (age 21) 0 0 Vietnam Hoàng Anh Gia Lai 2019 AFC Asian Cup PRE
FW Nguyễn Văn Quyết (1991-06-27) 27 June 1991 (age 28) 51 14 Vietnam Hà Nội 2018 AFF Championship

Notes:

  • [a] Withdrew from squad.
  • SUS Player suspended.
  • INJ Player withdrew from the squad due to an injury.
  • RET Retired from the national team.
  • WD Player withdrew from the squad for non-injury related reasons.
  • PRE Preliminary squad.

Previous squads[edit]

Coaching staff[edit]

Position Name Notes
Head Coach Park Hang-seo VFF
Technical Director Hans-Jürgen Gede VFF
Assistant Coach Lee Young-jin VFF
Lưu Danh Minh VFF
Lư Đình Tuấn HCMC FC
Goalkeeper Coach Trần Minh Quang HCMC FC
Fitness Coach Park Sung-gyun VFF
Doctor Choi Ju-young VFF
Trần Anh Tuấn VFF
Tuấn Nguyên Giáp VFF
Interpreter Lê Huy Khoa VFF
Lee Jung-hak VFF

Records[edit]

List of managers[edit]

Coach Park Hang-seo, considered as the most successful coach in Vietnam football history with FIFA praising Vietnam's progress throughout his managerial career with the team especially following the junior team success in AFC U-23 Championship as Asian runners-up and Asian Games as well the senior team in AFF Championship and AFC Asian Cup.[73]

Coaches by years since 1991

As of 18 December 2019.
List of Vietnamese coaches[74]
Image Name Nationality From To Pld W D L GF GA Win%[nb 1] Honours
Park Hang-seo 1 (cropped).JPG Park Hang-seo  South Korea 11 October 2017 Present 22 11 8 3 28 14 050.00 1 AFF Championship
Mai Đức Chung (Interim)  Vietnam 27 August 2017 11 October 2017 2 2 0 0 7 1 100.00
Nguyễn Hữu Thắng  Vietnam 3 March 2016 27 August 2017 16 8 6 2 15 14 050.00
Miuratoshiya.jpg Toshiya Miura  Japan 8 May 2014 28 January 2016 14 7 3 4 12 8 050.00
Hoàng Văn Phúc  Vietnam 16 May 2013 4 April 2014 3 1 0 2 1 3 033.33
Nguyễn Văn Sỹ (Interim)  Vietnam 1 January 2013 16 May 2013 4 1 0 3 025.00
Phan Thanh Hùng  Vietnam 1 September 2012 31 December 2012 14 5 5 4 12 10 035.71
Mai Đức Chung (Interim)  Vietnam 21 February 2012 31 August 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 !
Götz.JPG Falko Götz  Germany 1 June 2011 6 January 2012 5 3 0 2 15 6 060.00
Henrique Calisto.jpg Henrique Calisto  Portugal June 2008 1 March 2011 42 11 11 20 38 41 026.19 1 AFF Championship
Alfred Riedl, Fußballtrainer, Österreich (02).jpg Alfred Riedl  Austria 2005 October 2007 23 8 8 7 29 27 034.78
Trần Văn Khánh[75] (Interim)  Vietnam 12 December 2004 2005 1 1 0 0 3 0 100.00
Edson Tavares  Brazil 22 March 2004 12 December 2004 11 4 1 6 18 15 036.36
Nguyễn Thành Vinh (Interim)  Vietnam January 2004 February 2004 1 0 0 1 0 5 000.00
Alfred Riedl, Fußballtrainer, Österreich (02).jpg Alfred Riedl  Austria January 2003 December 2003 7 3 0 4 8 13 042.86
Henrique Calisto.jpg Henrique Calisto  Portugal August 2002 December 2002 10 5 3 2 27 18 050.00
Dido  Brazil December 2000 25 September 2001 6 3 1 2 9 9 050.00
Alfred Riedl, Fußballtrainer, Österreich (02).jpg Alfred Riedl  Austria August 1998 2000 31 16 6 9 54 21 051.61
Colin Murphy  England October 1997 1998 6 3 1 2 9 6 050.00
Lê Đình Chính (Interim)  Vietnam 1997 1997 1 0 0 1 0 4 000.00
Trần Duy Long  Vietnam 1997 1997 5 0 0 5 2 17 000.00
Karl-Heinz Weigang  Germany 1995 June 1997 17 9 2 6 37 33 052.94
Edson Tavares  Brazil 1995 1995 1 1 0 0 1 0 100.00
Trần Duy Long (Interim)  Vietnam 1994 1995 1 1 0 0 100.00
Trần Bình Sự  Vietnam 1993 1993 11 2 0 9 5 21 018.18
Nguyễn Sỹ Hiển  Vietnam 1993 1993 3 0 1 2 3 5 000.00
Vũ Văn Tư  Vietnam 1991 1991

Most capped players[edit]

Players in bold are still active for the national team
Most capped players record
# Player Career Caps Goals
1 Lê Công Vinh 2004–2016 83 51
2 Phạm Thành Lương 2008–2016 78 7
3 Nguyễn Minh Phương 2002–2010 73 12
4 Nguyễn Trọng Hoàng 2009– 69 12
5 Lê Huỳnh Đức 1995–2004 66 28
6 Lê Tấn Tài 2006–2014 63 3
7 Nguyễn Văn Quyết 2011– 51 14
8 Phan Văn Tài Em 2002–2011 50 7
9 Nguyễn Hồng Sơn 1993–2001 48 16
10 Quế Ngọc Hải 2014– 46 3

Top goalscorers[edit]

Players in bold are still active for the national team
Top goalscorers record
# Player Career Goals Caps Average
1 Lê Công Vinh 2004–2016 51 83 0.61
2 Lê Huỳnh Đức 1995–2004 28 66 0.42
3 Nguyễn Hồng Sơn 1993–2001 16 48 0.33
4 Nguyễn Văn Quyết 2011– 14 51 0.27
5 Phan Thanh Bình 2003–2009 13 31 0.42
6 Nguyễn Anh Đức 2006–2019 12 36 0.33
Nguyễn Trọng Hoàng 2009– 12 69 0.17
Nguyễn Minh Phương 2002–2010 12 73 0.16
9 Thạch Bảo Khanh 2002–2008 10 22 0.45

Records against all nations[edit]

Include the results of  South Vietnam before 1975

As of 19 November 2019
Team Pld W D L GF GA Win%[nb 2] Confederation
 Afghanistan 2 0 2 0 1 1 000.00 AFC
 Albania 1 0 0 1 0 5 000.00 UEFA
 Algeria 1 0 0 1 0 5 000.00 CAF
 Australia 3 0 0 3 0 3 000.00 AFC
 Bahrain 1 1 0 0 5 3 100.00 AFC
 Bangladesh 3 1 2 0 5 1 033.33 AFC
 Bosnia and Herzegovina 1 0 0 1 0 4 000.00 UEFA
 Cambodia 18 13 2 3 62 24 072.22 AFC
 China PR 13 0 1 12 13 31 000.00 AFC
 Chinese Taipei 15 7 4 4 31 19 046.67 AFC
 Cuba 1 1 0 0 2 1 100.00 CONCACAF
 Curaçao 1 0 1 0 1 1 000.00 CONCACAF
 Estonia 1 1 0 0 1 0 100.00 UEFA
 Egypt 1 0 0 1 1 4 000.00 CAF
 Germany1 1 0 0 1 1 2 000.00 UEFA
 Guam 2 2 0 0 20 0 100.00 AFC
 Guinea 1 1 0 0 2 1 100.00 CAF
 Hong Kong 19 8 3 8 33 31 042.11 AFC
 India 13 3 2 8 15 24 023.08 AFC
 Indonesia 37 11 10 16 50 62 029.73 AFC
 Iran 2 0 1 1 2 4 000.00 AFC
 Iraq 4 0 1 3 3 7 000.00 AFC
 Israel 4 1 0 3 4 8 025.00 UEFA
 Jamaica 1 1 0 0 3 0 100.00 CONCACAF
 Japan 10 3 0 7 8 20 030.00 AFC
 Jordan 3 0 3 0 2 2 000.00 AFC
 Kazakhstan 1 1 0 0 2 1 100.00 UEFA
 North Korea 14 1 4 9 9 27 007.14 AFC
 South Korea 23 2 6 15 21 60 008.70 AFC
 Kuwait 3 1 0 2 3 5 033.33 AFC
 Laos 20 18 2 0 78 5 090.00 AFC
 Lebanon 5 1 3 1 5 5 020.00 AFC
 Macau 2 2 0 0 13 1 100.00 AFC
 Malaysia2 33 15 6 12 41 44 045.45 AFC
 Maldives 2 1 0 1 4 3 050.00 AFC
 Mozambique 2 2 0 0 5 0 100.00 CAF
 Mongolia 3 3 0 0 8 1 100.00 AFC
 Myanmar 25 11 3 11 49 35 044.00 AFC
   Nepal 2 2 0 0 7 0 100.00 AFC
 New Zealand 2 2 0 0 6 1 100.00 OFC
 Oman 2 0 0 2 0 8 000.00 AFC
 Pakistan 1 0 1 0 1 1 000.00 AFC
 Palestine 2 1 0 1 5 3 050.00 AFC
 Philippines 19 16 1 2 72 13 084.21 AFC
 Qatar 6 2 1 3 5 14 033.33 AFC
 Russia 1 1 0 0 1 0 100.00 UEFA
 Saudi Arabia 2 0 0 2 0 9 000.00 AFC
 Singapore 39 21 13 5 71 43 053.85 AFC
 Sri Lanka 4 1 3 0 7 6 025.00 AFC
 Syria 3 1 1 1 2 1 033.33 AFC
 Tajikistan 2 0 0 2 0 8 000.00 AFC
 Thailand 47 22 6 19 48 48 046.81 AFC
 Turkmenistan 6 1 0 5 4 12 016.67 AFC
 United Arab Emirates 6 2 0 4 4 13 033.33 AFC
 Uzbekistan 2 0 0 2 1 6 000.00 AFC
 Yemen3 2 2 0 0 11 0 100.00 AFC
 Zimbabwe 1 0 0 1 0 6 000.00 CAF
Total 480 199 92 189 834 728 FIFA

Honours[edit]

Include the results of  South Vietnam before 1975

Continental

Regional

1st, gold medalist(s) Champion (2): 2008, 2018
2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up (1): 1998
1st, gold medalist(s) Champion (1): 1959
2nd, silver medalist(s) Runner-up (4): 1967, 1973, 1995, 1999

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

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External links[edit]