Vijaya (bow)

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Vijaya
Service history
Used by Shiva
Indra
Karna
Production history
Designer Vishvakarman

Vijaya (Sanskrit:विजय) meaning victory[1][2] was the divine bow of Karna, the eldest brother of the pandavas and later the king of Anga in the Mahabharata.It was made by Vishvakarman and presented to him by his teacher Parasurama,who received the bow from Shiva.[3][4]

Mythology[edit]

Parasurama teaches karna all his celestial weapons and gives him his chariot and bow.However in the aftermath of discovering he was not a brahmin, he cursed him to forget knowledge needed to use the Brahma weapon at the time of his death when engaged in battle with someone of equal prowess,but blessed him with immortal fame,everlasting glory and invincibility as long he held the Vijaya in his hands.[5][6]

Features[edit]

The Vijaya bow provided supremacy and victory against external foes,factors such as power, wealth,social prejudices, environmental conditions etc.[7][8]

In the Mahābharata[edit]

Karna and Parashurama[edit]

Parasurama took Karna as his student after enquiring of his lineage as explained in the Mahabharatha.Parasurama gave his student his celestial weapons and his personal bow Vijaya[9].

Kurukshetra war[edit]

Karna used the Vijaya bow , in the Kurukshetra war, where he invoked the powerful bhargav astra using the bow,forced Arjuna and Krishna to retreat and heavily wounded Yudhisthira.[10]



Knowing Karna's might, Krishna on the 17th day warned Arjuna,praised Karna's might and prowess and explained his merits.

Hear in brief, O son of Pandu! I regard the mighty car-warrior Karna as thy equal, or perhaps, thy superior! In energy he is equal to Agni. As regards speed, he is equal to the impetuosity of the wind. In wrath, he resembles the Destroyer (Shiva) himself. Endued with might, he resembles a lion in the formation of his body. He is eight ratnis in stature. His arms are large. His chest is broad. He is invincible. He is sensitive (about his manhood and honour). He is a hero. He is, again, the foremost of heroes. He is exceedingly handsome. Possessed of every accomplishment of a warrior, he is a dispeller of the fears of his friends. No one, not even the gods with Vasava (Indra) at their head, can slay the son of Radha, save thee, as I think. No one possessed of flesh and blood, not even the gods fighting with great care, nor all the warriors of the three worlds fighting together can vanquish that car-warrior.

— Lord Krishna to Arjun, [11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Publishing, Penguin Adult (2005). The Penguin Book Of Names For Australian Babies. Penguin UK. ISBN 9780857968517. 
  2. ^ Kozok, Uli (2015). A 14th Century Malay Code of Laws: The Nitisarasamuccaya. Institute of Southeast Asian Studies. ISBN 9789814459747. 
  3. ^ Shah, Umakant Premanand (1995). Studies in Jaina Art and Iconography and Allied Subjects in Honour of Dr. U.P. Shah. Abhinav Publications. ISBN 9788170173168. 
  4. ^ Narasimhan, Chakravarthi V. (1999). The Mahābhārata: An English Version Based on Selected Verses. Motilal Banarsidass Publ. ISBN 9788120816732. 
  5. ^ Srivastava, Diwaker Ikshit (2017). Decoding the Metaphor Mahabharata. Leadstart Publishing PvtLtd. ISBN 9789352010004. 
  6. ^ Srivastava, Diwaker Ikshit (2017). Decoding the Metaphor Mahabharata. Leadstart Publishing PvtLtd. ISBN 9789352010004. 
  7. ^ Srivastava, Diwaker Ikshit (2017). Decoding the Metaphor Mahabharata. Leadstart Publishing PvtLtd. ISBN 9789352010004. 
  8. ^ Srivastava, Diwaker Ikshit (2017). Decoding the Metaphor Mahabharata. Leadstart Publishing PvtLtd. ISBN 9789352010004. 
  9. ^ Kotru, Umesh; Zutshi, Ashutosh (2015). Karna The Unsung Hero of the Mahabharata. Leadstart Publishing PvtLtd. ISBN 9789352013043. 
  10. ^ "The Mahabharata, Book 8: Karna Parva: Section 64". www.sacred-texts.com. 
  11. ^ K M Ganguly(1883-1896) The Mahabharatha Book 8: Karna Parva Section72 Lord Krishna explains the might of Karna,October 2003,Retrieved 2014-02-13